ANTH158 - THE NEOLITHIC REVOLUTION

The advent of food production/agriculture in prehistory, sometimes referred to as the "Neolithic Revolution," represents key economic, social, and biological transitions for human groups. Food production was characterized by the possibility for the accumulation of food surpluses, which could be used as a form of wealth. It also resulted in the reorganization of social and ritual life as people settled more permanently in villages or were involved in pastoral lifeways. Additionally, densely packed living conditions and a close association with domesticated animals led to the spread of diseases, and new forms of labor related to farming tasks, as well as diets focused on a narrower range of foods, created biological stresses in these populations. This course examines several examples of the "Neolithic Revolution" throughout the world, including the Middle East, China, Europe, Mesoamerica, South America, and the North American Southwest.
Section 601 - LEC
W 0600PM-0900PM
OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH IRENE
UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345