ANTH403 - ECOLOGIES OF TRANSLATION

The things we buy, carry around, use, enjoy, and throw away connect our bodies to lives and ecologies around the world. This class will examine how consuming,living with, and disposing of material objects draws us into a conversation - however partial and limited - with different people, cultures, and environments. We will trace two key sites of translation: when natural resources become consumer goods, and when goods become or create wastes. What stories are told to make sense of these ecological alterations? How do these material translations relate to social and cultural histories, ideas, andbeliefs? How does our use of certain things in everyday life connect to the lived experiences of others and to environmental change, and in what specific ways? As new technology, free trade, and deregulation accelerate the speed and complexity with which things and ideas flow across borders, it becomes necessary for scholars to pay attention to the consequences (increasing economic inequality, ecological crises, disasters, environmental racism and injustice, and unethical working conditions in factories producing consumer goods, to name a few) of these changes. In this course we will read texts, writjournals and essays, and participate in discussions of the effects of this globnetwork of producing, buying, and disposing, paying close attention to the often overlooked or forgotten places where American waste and toxins end up: in poor and marginalized communities. We will consider the how these patterns stem from legacies of colonialism, imperialism, racism, and gender inequality. We will engage with writings, films, art, and everyday objects to better understand how the movement of physical stuff connects us to diverse ecologies and their material histories, always in a process of translation.
Section 301 - SEM - ECOLOGIES OF TRANSLATION: CONSUMPTION, WASTE, & ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE
TR 0300PM-0430PM
HATMAKER, MELISSA
UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330