Mariam Durrani

I am a joint doctoral student at the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education and Department of Anthropology.  My current research focuses on language mixing practices among urban Pakistani and American university-aged youth to understand their hybridized register(s). I am also interested in the communicative practices of Urdu-Hindi speaking high
school students. My work explores the construction of diaspora and racialized identities through the language mixing practices of transnational youth. I am interested in how the form, through the filmic, can help further our understanding of syncretic communicative practices.

Research Interests:

Transnationalism, semiotics, register formations, notions of diaspora, language education in Pakistan, anthropology of youth, language ideology, ethnographic film, South Asian heritage, postcoloniality, racialized construction of brown identities.

Publications:

*Articles:*

Durrani, Mariam. (2012) “Banishing Colonial Specters: Language Ideology and Education Policy in Pakistan.” Working Papers in Educational Linguistics. 27, 1.

*Book Reviews:*

Durrani, Mariam. (2012). Review of Multilingualism, Citizenship, and Identity. Julie Byrd Clark. Anthropology and Education Quarterly (forthcoming).

Durrani, Mariam. (2011) Review of Social Justice through Multilingual Education. Tove Skutnabb-Kangas, Robert Phillipson, Ajit K. Mohanty and Minati Panda (eds). Language Policy 10, 3.

*Selected refereed conference papers:*

“Karna chahiye: Exploring the Diaspora through a Study of Language Mixing Practices.” Paper Presentation at the  American Anthropological Association Meeting (2011).

“Being Desi: Circulating Emblems of Identity for South Asian Diasporic Students in an American Public School.” Paper presentation at the Georgetown Roundtable for Language and Linguistics (2011).