Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 010-401 ARCHAEOLOGY & TECHNOLOGY COBB, PETER T 0430PM-0730PM Spring 2018: This seminar explores how humans apply and modify technologies in contexts as diverse as everyday life, major politico-economic undertakings, or scholarly research. We investigate this through a comparison of technologies of the past with technologies of the present used to study the past.¿We will dig into the details of topics like building pyramids and tombs, the function of ancient astronomical devices, pre-telegraph long-distance communication, tools for cutting and carving stone, and kilns for firing pottery. Archaeologists study these issues by examining the material remains of past societies: the cut-marks on stone blocks, extant tomb structures, the debris of manufacturing activities, and much more. Today's technologies enable the detailed scientific examination of the evidence, improving our understanding of the past. Thus, in parallel with our investigation of past technologies, we will also study the history of the application of present technologies to research on the archaeological record. We will dig into topics like the first uses of computers and databases, the development of statistical methods, early digital 3d modeling of objects and architecture, the adoption of geophysical prospection and geographic information systems, and the emerging uses of machine learning. In some cases, we can even compare old and new technologies directly, such as with land measurement and surveying techniques. Throughout the class we will engage in readings and discussions on the theory of humans and technology, to gain a better understanding of how processes such as innovation function in all time periods.
    FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
    ARTH 070-401 LATINX LITERATURE AND CULTURE STERNAD PONCE DE LEON, JENNIFER MW 0330PM-0500PM This course offers a broad introduction to U.S. Latina/o/x literature, visual art, and theater. We will read poetry, short stories, novels, plays, and essays and we will examine visual art from across a wide range of mediums and traditions, including poster art, performance and video art, murals, graffiti, conceptual art, and guerrilla urban interventions. In each instance, we will study this work within its historical context and with close attention to the ways it illuminates class formation, racialization, and ideologies of gender and sexuality. Topics addressed in the course will include the historical formation of different Latina/o/x identities, revolutionary nationalism and its critique, anti-imperialist thought, feminisms, immigration, queer latinidades, ideology and racialization, and the study of literature and art within social movements. While we will address key texts, historical events, and intellectual currents from the late 19th century and early 20th century, the course will focus primarily on literature and art from the 1960s to the present. All texts will be in English.
      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
      ARTH 100-301 The Afterlife of Things OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT CANCELED Topic varies. Spring 2018: Starting with the Penn Museum and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the seminar will visit major collections of Philadelphia, both to examine the works of art and artifacts (on display and in storage) and to meet with directors, curators, keepers, and collectors. Most meetings will take place in the museums, not in the classroom. While the seminar will provide an overview of the history of art, our discussions on site will focus on changing aesthetics and collecting practices, aspects of display and contextualization, the institution of the museum, thing theory, and the blurred boundaries between ethnography, archaeology, and art history.
        FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
        ARTH 102-401 RENAISSANCE-CONTEMPORARY: Introduction to Western Art, 1400-Present SHAW, GWENDOLYN
        DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
        TR 1200PM-0130PM This course is an introduction to the visual arts including painting, sculpture, print culture, and new media such as photography, film, performance and installation art in Europe and the United States from 1400 to the present. It offers a broad historical overview of the key movements and artists of the period, as well as an investigation into the crucial themes and contexts that mark visual art production after the middle ages. Such themes include the secularization of art; the (gendered) role of the artist in society; the sites of art production and consumption such as the artist's studio, the royal courts and the art exhibition; the materials of art; the import of technology and science to art's making, content and distribution; the rise of art criticism; and the socio-political contexts of patronage and audience; among others.
          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 103-401 ART & CIV IN EAST ASIA STEINHARDT, NANCY MW 1000AM-1100AM Introduction to major artistic traditions of China and Japan and to the methodological practices of art history. Attention given to key cultural concepts and ways of looking, in such topics as: concepts of the afterlife and its representation; Buddhist arts and iconography; painting styles and subjects; and more broadly at the transmission of styles and cultural practices across East Asia. Serves as an introduction to upper level lecture courses in East Asian art history cultures. If size of class permits, certain sessions will be held in the Penn Museum or the Philadelphia Museum of Art.
            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            ARTH 104-401 INTRO TO ART IN S. ASIA GHOSH, PIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a survey of sculpture, painting and architecture in the Indian sub-continent from 2300 B.C., touching on the present. It attempts to explore the role of tradition in the broader history of art in India, but not to see India as 'traditional' or unchanging. The Indian sub-continent is the source for multi-cultural civilizations that have lasted and evolved for several thousand years. Its art is as rich and complex as that of Europe and diverse. This course introduces the full range of artistic production in India in relation to the multiple strands that have made the cultural fabric of the sub-continent so rich and long lasting.
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
              ARTH 107-601 TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA COX, JULIA M 0500PM-0800PM As a complex cultural product, television lends itself to a variety of critical approaches that build-on, parallel, or depart from film studies. This introductory course in television studies begins with an overview of the medium's history and explores how technical and industrial changes correspond to developing conventions of genre, programming, and aesthetics. Along the way, we analyze key concepts and theoretical debates that shaped the field. In particular, we will focus on approaches to textual analysis in combination with industry research, and critical engagements with the political, social and cultural dimensions of television as popular culture.
                ARTH 108-401 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 MAZAJ, META TR 0300PM-0430PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                  ARTH 109-401 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES CORRIGAN, TIMOTHY TR 1200PM-0130PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                    ARTH 228-601 GREEK ARCH & URBANISM CHALIKIAS, KONSTANTINOS M 0500PM-0800PM Introduction to the art of building and city planning in the ancient Greek world, 7th-1st c. BC. Emphasis on concepts of organizing space, on issues of structure, materials, decoration, proportion, and the Mycenean and eastern heritage as well as on theory and practice of urbanism as reflected in ancient cities (Athens, Pergamon, Alexandria) and writings (Plato, Artistotle, and others). Excursions to the Penn Museum and Philadelphia. No prerequisites.
                      ARTH 229-401 ROMAN ARCH & URBANISM: POMPEII AND HERCULANEUM STINSON, PHILIP TR 1030AM-1200PM In addition to the sense of human catastrophe, the ruins of the ancient cities Pompeii and Herculaneum provide insights into the cultural, social, and political life of Italian cities during Roman times (2nd century B.C.E. 79 C.E.). The architecture and decorations of their public buildings, spaces, and houses, and the changes observable in them, can be considered characteristic of Roman cities in general. Burial by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 also provides a unique glimpse of events that occurred at one specific moment in time. Reception of these lost cities and of their arts in particular reverberates in modern society.
                        ARTH 245-401 GOTHIC ARCH: GOLD+STONE GUERIN, SARAH TR 1030AM-1200PM Key monuments of the Middle Ages, the Gothic cathedrals of Western Europe present a synthesis of the theological, economic, and social developments of the twelfth through fourteenth centuries. A harmonious marriage between technology and aesthetics, of political power and imagination, these immense and ingenious structures are as famous for their sculptural programs as they are for the liturgies that animated their spaces. Students will also be introduced to local uses of Gothic in Philadelphia architecture to better understand the lived experiences of these built manifestations of transcendence.
                          ARTH 250-401 MICHELANGELO ITAL REN: MICHELANGELO AND THE ART OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE KIM, DAVID MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources.
                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                            ARTH 274-601 FACING AMERICA SPERLING, JULIET M 0500PM-0800PM This course explores the visual history of race in the United States as both self-fashioning and cultural mythology by examining the ways that conceptions of Native American, Latino, and Asian identity, alongside ideas of Blackness and Whiteness, have combined to create the various cultural ideologies of class, gender, and sexuality that remain evident in historical visual and material culture. We also investigate the ways that these creations have subsequently helped to launch new visual entertainments, including museum spectacles, blackface minstrelsy, and early film, from the colonial period through the 1940s.
                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                              ARTH 281-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT HAGAN, CAROL MW 0100PM-0200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
                                SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                ARTH 294-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1100AM-1200PM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasinglyimportant exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                                  SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                  ARTH 295-401 CINEMA AND MEDIA: GLOBAL FILM THEORY MAZAJ, META
                                  REDROBE, KAREN
                                  TR 1030AM-1130AM This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be no screenings for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mid-term; 1 take-home final.
                                    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                    ARTH 299-401 RADICAL ARTS: LITERATURE, VISUAL ARTS, THEATER AND CINEMA IN THE AMERICAS STERNAD PONCE DE LEON, JENNIFER MW 0200PM-0330PM This course examines intersections of artistic production and radical politics in the 20th and 21st centuries. It addresses art from across a wide array of media: street art, film, theater, poetry, performance art, fiction, graphic arts, digital media, and urban interventions. We will examine artistic movements and artists from across the Americas, including revolutionary Latin American theater, film, and literature; the art of Black Liberation in the U.S.; the Chicano art movement and its queer dissidents; street performance and protest produced in the context of dictatorship; anticolonial performance art and alternative reality gaming; and activist art, political theater, and cinema from the 21st century. Through its focus on the relationship between art and politics, this course also introduces students to foundational concepts related to the relationship between culture and power more broadly.
                                      CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                      ARTH 300-301 UNDERGRAD METHODS SEM DRPIC, IVAN R 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies.
                                        ARTH 315-401 TOPICS IN JAPANESE ART: UKIYO-E DAVIS, JULIE CANCELED Spring 2018: This course will focus on Japanese woodblock prints, printed books, and paintings from the seventeenth through the mid-nineteenth century in the genre of ukiyo-e. Among questions we will consider are: How did Ukiyo-e or the pictures of the floating world emerge as a genre and what was at stake for its makers and consumers? What are new approaches that we can use for the field? Topics will include themes shown in prints ( celebrity actors and courtesans, the landscape and others), specific artists and their works. We will study original works held in the Kislak Collection and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, as well as other local collections as available, and we will work with emerging digital humanities tools for individual and group projects.
                                          ARTH 343-301 TPCS IN MEDIEVAL/REN ART: ART, POLITICS, AND POWER IN LATE MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE FRANCE HERMAN, NICHOLAS M 0200PM-0500PM This course will examine the commission, production, and display of art at the Valois courts from the start of the Hundred Years War with England 1330s to the death of Francis I in 1547. During these two centuries, conflict and conquest shaped the making of artwork in profound and sometimes unexpected ways: precarious dynastic claims could be substantiated through carefully crafted images, while foreign artists (including Rosso Fiorentino, Francesco Primaticcio, and Leonardo da Vinci) could be called upon to boost the monarch s prestige. Investigating the role played by objects in cultural diplomacy and propaganda, this course will examine works in a wide variety of techniques including easel painting, manuscript illumination, tapestry, armor, and metalwork, without neglecting less tangible art forms such as feasting, chivalric tournaments, and royal processions. Topics will include the art of the gift, female patronage, the interaction between text and image, and the role of artists in shaping a royal visual identity. The course will include visits to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and an illuminated manuscript handling session at the Free Library of Philadelphia.¿¿
                                            ARTH 363-601 TOPICS IN GLOBAL BAROQUE W 0530PM-0830PM
                                              ARTH 370-401 TWENTIETH CENTURY NEW YORK: THEORIES, IMAGES, REALITIES CUSTER, LEEANN
                                              OCKMAN, JOAN
                                              W 0200PM-0500PM "New York is the perfect model of a city, not the model of a perfect city." -Lewis Mumford. This course is constructed as an argument among four visionary thinkers whose differing theories of the twentieth-century city were shaped by their response to New York City's modern urban architectural, and environmental development: Lewis Mumford (1895-1990), Robert Moses (1888-1981), Jane Jacobs (1916-2006), and Rem Koolhaas (1944-). The seminar explores the central problems that preoccupied each, from civic representation and sustainability to large-scale infrastructure and urban renewal, from community and complexity to urban experience and the urban imaginary. Readings of key texts by and about the four main figures are supplemented with related material and with case studies of New York's built environment. The class includes two trips to New York to visit selected sites. The focus is double: on the role and agency of the "urban intellectual" in the production of urban culture; and on New York's material history and visual representations. New York has been called the capital of the twentieth century. The seminar aims to assess the continuing relevance of the ideas of this quartet of influential thinkers and to reflect on twenty-first-century New York in light of its evolution over the last hundred years.
                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                ARTH 385-401 MODERNISM AND THE THEORY OF FASHION RABATE, JEAN-MICHEL TR 0900AM-1030AM Topic varies. Spring 2018: In this class we will study international modernism from 1860 to 1940 by focusing on the emergence of a concept of the "new" that was also understood as a "new fashion." What was the fashion of the new, how was it linked with fashion itself? The rise of modernism was accompanied by a series of self-conscious discourses on fashion, the first of which were elaborated by Baudelaire and Mallarme. We will follow the social uses of the "new" in the context of the fashion industry so as to map a cultural history of "fashion" as it was developed by Walter Benjamin and Georg Simmel. We will read through Baudelaire and Mallarme's prose and poetry, then engage with Aragon's Surrealist novel Paris Peasant, after which we will survey selected sections of Benjamin's Arcades Project. All the while, the Fashion Theory: A Reader will serve as our theoretical guide.
                                                  ARTH 386-301 TOPICS IN 20TH CENT ART: DUCHAMP'S OBJECTS: MATTER AND MODERNITY KAUFFMAN, ALEXANDER W 0330PM-0630PM Topic Varies. Spring 2018: In 1913, Marcel Duchamp posed a nebulous question central to much of the art of the twentieth century. As a young painter in Paris, he wrote in a private note: "Is it possible to make works that are not of art ?" What are the possibilities of making in a modern world that has alienated labor from its products and commodified the work of art? What is the artist s role amidst forces of rapid industrialization, mechanization, and automation? Duchamp would continuously explore these questions in a career that stretched into the 1960s, pushing painting, sculpture, and film in new directions through the use of objects not traditionally associated with art a porcelain urinal, a collection of settled dust, a tuft of human hair. This course examines issues of materiality and media in Duchamp s art and in modernism more broadly. Meetings will include visits to the Duchamp collection at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Readings will draw from art history, literature, and social and political theory.
                                                    ARTH 427-401 ROMAN SCULPTURE KUTTNER, ANN TR 0130PM-0300PM Survey of the Republican origins and Imperial development of Roman sculpture - free-standing, relief, and architectural - from ca. 150 BC to 350 AD. We concentrate on sculpture in the capital city and on court and state arts, emphasizing commemorative public sculpture and Roman habits of decorative display; genres examined include relief, portraits, sarcophagi, luxury and minor arts(gems, metalwork, coinage). We evaluate the choice and evolution of styles with reference to the functions of sculptural representation in Roman culture and society.
                                                      ARTH 433-401 THE PAST PRESERVED: CONSERVATION IN ARCHAEOLOGY GRANT, LYNN TR 0300PM-0430PM This course explores the scientific conservation of cultural materials from archaeological contexts. It is intended to familiarize students with the basics of artifact conservation but is not intended to train them as conservators. The course will cover how various materials interact with their deposit environments; general techniques for on-site conservation triage and retrieval of delicate materials; what factors need to be considered in planning for artifact conservation; and related topics. Students should expect to gain a thorough understanding of the role of conservation in archaeology and how the two fields interact.
                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                        ARTH 506-401 ELECTRONIC LIT SEMINAR: COPYRIGHT AND CULTURE DECHERNEY, PETER W 0200PM-0500PM This course is designed to introduce advanced undergraduate and graduate students to the range of new opportunities for literary research afforded by recent technological innovation. See the English Department's website at www.english.upenn.edu for a description of the current offerings.
                                                          ARTH 510-401 BUDDHIST TEXTS & CONTEXTS MCDANIEL, JUSTIN M 0200PM-0500PM This is an advanced course for upper level undergraduates and graduate students on various issues in the study of Buddhist texts, art, and history. Each semester the theme of the course changes. In recent years themes have included: Magic and Ritual, Art and Material Culture, Texts and Contexts, Manuscript Studies.
                                                            ARTH 517-401 HISTORY OF THE BOOK IN EAST ASIA CHANCE, LINDA
                                                            DAVIS, JULIE
                                                            T 0130PM-0430PM Spring 2018: From handscrolls to manga, books play a vital role in East Asian societies. In this course we will introduce the spread of book cultures across East Asia and reconsider the role and impact of material texts on societies in China, Korea, and Japan. Among the questions we ll engage are: What is a book, an author, or an edition? How do readers affect books? How do publishers decide when to use illustrations, woodblock printing, or movable type? How has the history of books differed in China, Japan, and Korea from the history of the book in the West? We will consider various media (bamboo, paper, silk, and the digital), formats (scrolls, folded books, bound books, small to oversize), and the tensions between handwritten manuscript and printed pages. Hands-on sessions may include paper-making, bookbinding, and printing. This is an Objects-Based Learning course, using materials from the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts, and the Penn Museum, with visits to the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the Free Library of Philadelphia. Requires no knowledge of any Asian language.
                                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                              ARTH 522-401 TOPIC IN ANC IRANIAN ART: THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE PERSIAN GULF FROM THE NEOLITHIC TO THE ROMANS PITTMAN, HOLLY W 0330PM-0630PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: This seminar will focus on the environmental, archaeological and textual record for settlement in the Persian/Arabian Gulf region from the Neolithic to the pre-Islamic Late Antique. Emphasis will be on the settlement history and material culture. Special attention will be paid to the close interaction of the local communities on the Arabian side of the Gulf with those on the Iranian/Indus valley side. The patterns of sea faring trade and interaction from Mesopotamia, Iran, Indus Valley and beyond will be considered. It is possible that this class will take a site trip to the UAE during the spring break, if the logistics can be arranged. Instructors: Professors Holly Pittman (Penn), Peter Magee (Bryn Mawr College).
                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                ARTH 537-401 TOPICS IN ART OF IRAN: FROM THE SASANIANS TO THE ABBASIDS HOLOD, RENATA
                                                                KUTTNER, ANN
                                                                W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: The pro-seminar will examine aspects of continuity and rupture in the visual culture(s) of the Iranian world. This is an opportunity for students whose preparations may be centered on other contiguous periods or regions to consider the manner in which Middle Asia and its rich visual cultures contributed to the forging of Late Antique and medieval/ Islamic visual expressions of kingship, territory and religion. The seminar will consider a range of materials from archaeological sites, rock reliefs and wall paintings to textiles, silver vessels, coins and ceramics, with special attention to materials excavated or otherwise held by the Penn Museum.
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  ARTH 540-401 TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ART: MIGRATING MATERIALITY: IVORY AROUND THE MEDITERRANEAN GUERIN, SARAH T 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: The craft of ivory carving around the Mediterranean is contingent upon the availability of imported elephant tusks, from either South East Asia or, more frequently, from the African continent. The shifting winds of trade routes offer an interpretive paradigm with which to analyze ivory objects from a variety of different cultural groups: the lack or abundance of ivory and the resulting desire for or surfeit of the material shapes its meaning and use around the Mediterranean basin. The study of ivory objects as they migrate around the Mediterranean allows us to investigate the rich intercultural interactions between Eastern and Western Christians, and both of these with the Islamic world. This course focuses on an object oriented knowledge of ivory artefacts, with a strong emphasis on the collections at the PennMuseum, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and other area collections.
                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    ARTH 560-401 TOPICS IN AESTHETICS: WALTER BENJAMIN WEISSBERG, LILIANE T 0300PM-0500PM Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) is a philosopher whose writings on art, literature, and politics have had tremendous influence on many disciplines in the Humanities and Social Studies. He has been variously described as one of the leading German-Jewish thinkers, and a secular Marxist theorist. With the publication of a four-volume collection of this works in English, many more of his writings have been made accessible to a wider public. Our seminar will undertake a survey of his work that begins with his studies on language and allegory, and continues with his autobiographical work, his writings on art and literature, and on the imaginary urban spaces of the nineteenth-century.
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                      ARTH 596-401 TOPICS IN CONTEMP ART: ART AND RESISTANCE HAYES, SHARON
                                                                      REDROBE, KAREN
                                                                      R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: An experimental class for artists and scholars. Organized around a series of case studies of artists, collectives, infrastructures, and curatorial projects, the course includes: in-class discussion and viewing; workshops with class visitors; site visits; participation in small reading groups. In the first half of the class, students will complete some short assignments. In addition, students will complete a final project that is intentionally open in terms of form. The project, which can be collective or individual in nature, will enable an in-depth material investigation of one of the threads of the class.¿
                                                                        CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                        ARTH 629-401 ROMAN ARCH & URBANISM: POMPEII AND HERCULANEUM STINSON, PHILIP TR 1030AM-1200PM In addition to the sense of human catastrophe, the ruins of the ancient cities Pompeii and Herculaneum provide insights into the cultural, social, and political life of Italian cities during Roman times (2nd century B.C.E. 79 C.E.). The architecture and decorations of their public buildings, spaces, and houses, and the changes observable in them, can be considered characteristic of Roman cities in general. Burial by the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 also provides a unique glimpse of events that occurred at one specific moment in time. Reception of these lost cities and of their arts in particular reverberates in modern society.
                                                                          ARTH 645-401 GOTHIC ARCH: GOLD+STONE GUERIN, SARAH TR 1030AM-1200PM Key monuments of the Middle Ages, the Gothic cathedrals of Western Europe present a synthesis of the theological, economic, and social developments of the twelfth through fourteenth centuries. A harmonious marriage between technology and aesthetics, of political power and imagination, these immense and ingenious structures are as famous for their sculptural programs as they are for the liturgies that animated their spaces. Students will also be introduced to local uses of Gothic in Philadelphia architecture to better understand the lived experiences of these built manifestations of transcendence.
                                                                            ARTH 650-401 MICHELANGELO ITAL REN: MICHELANGELO AND THE ART OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE KIM, DAVID MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the work of the Renaissance artist Michelangelo (1475-1564)-his sculptures, paintings, architecture, poetry, and artistic theory-in relation to his patrons, predecessors, and contemporaries, above all Leonardo and Raphael. Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and will analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources.
                                                                              ARTH 681-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT HAGAN, CAROL MW 0100PM-0200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
                                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                ARTH 694-401 ART NOW SILVERMAN, KAJA MW 1100AM-1200PM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                                                                                  ARTH 695-401 CINEMA AND MEDIA: GLOBAL FILM THEORY MAZAJ, META
                                                                                  REDROBE, KAREN
                                                                                  TR 1030AM-1130AM This course will provide an introduction to some of the most important film theory debates, and allow us to explore how writers and filmmakers from different countries and historical periods have attempted to make sense of the changing phenomenon known as "cinema," to think cinematically. Topics under consideration may include: spectatorship, authorship, the apparatus, sound, editing, realism, race, gender and sexuality, stardom, the culture industry, the nation and decolonization, what counts as film theory and what counts as cinema, and the challenges of considering film theory in a global context, including the challenge of working across languages. There will be no screenings for this course. No knowledge of film theory is presumed. Course requirements: attendance at lecture and participation in lecture and section discussions; canvas postings; 1 in-class mideterm; 1 take-home final.
                                                                                    ARTH 729-401 TOP IN ROM ARCH/TOPOGRAP: ANCIENT ROMAN ARCHITECTURE AND THE DIGITAL TURN STINSON, PHILIP W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: This seminar offers a critical assessment of digital Roman architecture studies. What has been accomplished and learned over the last generation since the Digital Turn, and where is the field of Roman architecture being taken? Points of focus include several landmark case studies, such as digital reconstructions of the city of ancient Rome, and threatened cultural heritage sites in Syria. The course will involve readings of significant texts, in class discussions and presentations lead by the seminar s participants, and testing and critiquing of a limited set of digital tools.
                                                                                      ARTH 732-401 TOPIC IN BYZ ART & ARCH: MEDIEVAL ART HISTORY AND THEORIES OF THE OBJECT DRPIC, IVAN M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: The recent "return" to the object across the humanities and social sciences has brought to the fore concerns with the nature of material things, their operation in the world, and their entanglement with humans. This seminar will introduce you to some of the key theoretical writings on the object and material culture and will ask you to interrogate their relevance for the discipline of art history. Our focus will be on the Middle Ages, but depending on the specific interests of the seminar s participants, we may venture into other historical periods and cultural domains. Topics to be addressed include the social life of things; agency; materiality; the relic; the gift; the miniature; and the question of the human/nonhuman divide.
                                                                                        ARTH 752-301 TOPICS IN REN TO CONTEMP: ART AND MONEY FROM THE RENAISSANCE TO THE 19TH CENTURY KIM, DAVID
                                                                                        DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
                                                                                        W 0330PM-0630PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: Does money have a period-specific and thus historically variable look? Can we speak of a visual system of money or an imagination of money? How do we address questions of status and class, poverty and wealth, in 21st-century art history, and how do we read Marx (among others) art historically these days? How do we analyze art that s responsive to market fluctuations or extreme financial expansions and recessions? The seminar will engage directly with depictions of money from the Renaissance to the 19th century: the design of bills, coins, insurance policies, bond or stock certificates; the material changes to the face of money under regime-change; and representations of transactions in pawn shops, casinos, stock exchanges, and other market places. But we will also take money less literally and think anew about the value of materials, artists pay, patron s funds, and more broadly the costs associated with the making and consumption of art.
                                                                                          ARTH 794-401 TPCS IN CONTEMPORARY ART: INSTALLATIONS, PROJECTIONS, DIVAGATIONS SILVERMAN, KAJA T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Spring 2018: This course will be devoted to an international group of contemporary artists who make visual works that are time-based, like cinema, but that are exhibited in museums and galleries, instead of movie theaters: Chantal Akerman, Tacita Dean, Rineke Dijkstra, Jeremy Blake, Isaac Julien, Anri Sala, Pierre Huyghe, William Kentridge and Paul Chan. Some of these artists rely on digital cameras and computers, and others prefer 16mm film, but regardless which medium they use, they are having a transformative effect on the museum. They make work that cannot be hung on a wall or placed on a pedestal, that takes up space, as well as time, that has an auditory dimension, and that often mobilizes more than one medium. Most of the assigned works will be available to us only in a digital form, but I will be on the lookout for installations that we can visit. However, since few museum goers watch more that a few minutes of an installed work, which may be one or two hours long, it could be argued that the classroom is also a necessary and important exhibition site. We will think hard about the differences between these two ways of looking at time-based work, and what they mean for the work itself. ¿(Limited to 16 students, by permission of the instructor.)
                                                                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR