Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 100-401 THE ECOLOGY OF ART LEVY, AARON T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: This course will examine the fascination with ecology in artistic thinking from late Modernism to the present, with a particular attention to the developing interest in social and environmental systems in the late 1960's and early 1970's. From Robert Smithson's Spiral Jetty to Rachel Carson's Silent Spring, artists, scholars and activists of this generation were deeply invested in the interconnectedness of life in all its forms. This new sensitivity to the affinities that bind individuals, and our vulnerability to social, political and economic environments, enabled new aesthetic approaches that have continued relevance today. As part of the course, we will meet with a range of artists, curators and institutions in Philadelphia who are continuing these investigations, including the Colored Girls Museum in Germantown and the Health Ecologies Lab here at Penn. No familiarity with contemporary art is required.
    OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
    ARTH 101-001 PREHISTORY - RENAISSANCE: INTRO TO WESTERN ART GUERIN, SARAH MW 1000AM-1100AM This is a double introduction: to looking at the visual arts; and, to the ancient and medieval cities and empires of three continents - ancient Egypt, the Middle East and Iran, the Minoan and Mycenaean Bronze Age, the Greek and Roman Mediterranean, and the early Islamic, early Byzantine and western Medieval world. Using images, contemporary texts, and art in our city, we examine the changing forms of art, architecture and landscape architecture, and the roles of visual culture for political, social and religious activity.
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 106-001 ARCHITECT AND HISTORY HASELBERGER, LOTHAR MWF 0100PM-0200PM Human experience is shaped by the built environment. This course introduces students to the interrelated fields of architecture, art history, and engineering and explores great architectural monuments from the ancient to the modern period, from India across the Mediterranean and Europe to the US. The focus will be on understanding these works in their structure and function, both as products of individual ingenuity and reflections of Zeitgeist. Questioning these monuments from a present-day perspective across the cultures will be an important ingredient, as will be podium discussions, guest lectures, excursions, and all kinds of visualizations, from digital walk-throughs to practical design exercises. Regularly taught in fall term, this course fulfills Sector IV, Humanities and Social Science, and it satisfies History of Art 100-level course requirements. This course cannot be taken on a pass/fail level. There is only ONE recitation in this course, attached directly to Friday's class at 2-3 p.m., in order to provide sufficient time for practica and field trips.
        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
        ARTH 107-401 TELEVISION AND NEW MEDIA FIUMARA, JAMES MW 0200PM-0330PM As a complex cultural product, television lends itself to a variety of critical approaches that build-on, parallel, or depart from film studies. This introductory course in television studies begins with an overview of the medium's history and explores how technical and industrial changes correspond to developing conventions of genre, programming, and aesthetics. Along the way, we analyze key concepts and theoretical debates that shaped the field. In particular, we will focus on approaches to textual analysis in combination with industry research, and critical engagements with the political, social and cultural dimensions of television as popular culture.
          ARTH 108-401 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 KAUFFMAN, ALEXANDER TR 0300PM-0430PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema's precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
            ARTH 109-401 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES CORRIGAN, TIMOTHY TR 0900AM-1030AM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film. At the same time, those formal features will be closely linked to historical and cultural distinctions and changes, ranging from the Paramount Decision of 1948 to the digital convergences that are defining screen culture today. There are no perquisites. Requirements will include readings in film history and film analysis, an analytical essay, a research paper, a final exam, and active participation. Fulfills the Arts and Letters Sector (All Classes).
              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
              ARTH 127-401 MATERIAL PAST DIG WORLD COBB, PETER TR 0300PM-0430PM The material remains of the human past -objects and spaces- provide tangible evidence of past people's lives. Today's information technologies improve our ability to document, study, and present these materials. But what does it mean to deal with material evidence in a virtual context? In this class, students will learn basic digital methods for studying the past while working with objects, including those in the collections of the Penn Museum. This class will teach relational database design and 3d object modeling. As we learn about acquiring and managing data, we will gain valuable experience in the evaluation and use of digital tools. The digital humanities are a platform both for learning the basic digital literacy students need to succeed in today's world and for discussing the human consequences of these new technologies and data. We will discuss information technology's impact on the study and presentation of the past, including topics such as public participation in archaeological projects, educational technologies in museum galleries, and the issues raised by digitizing and disseminating historic texts and objects. Finally, we will touch on technology's role in the preservation of the past in today's turbulent world. No prior technical experience is required, but we hope students will share an enthusiasm for the past.
                ARTH 209-401 AFRICAN ART CANCELED This selective survey examines a variety of the circumstances of sub-Saharan African art, ranging from imperial to nomadic cultures and from ancient times to contemporary participation in the international market. Iconography, themes and style will be considered, as will questions of modernity, religious impact, tradition and colonialism.
                  ARTH 224-401 ART OF MESOPOTAMIA PITTMAN, HOLLY TR 0130PM-0300PM A survey of the art of Mesopotamia from 4000 B.C. through the conquest of Alexander the Great.
                    ARTH 226-401 HELL & ROM ART/ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.
                      ARTH 227-401 Introduction to Mediterranean Archaeology BOWES, KIMBERLY MW 1000AM-1100AM The cultures of Greece and Rome, what we call classical antiquity, span over a thousand years of multicultural achievement in the Mediterranean. This course tells the story of what it was like to live in the complex societies of ancient Greece and Rome. This story is told principally using the art, architecture, pottery and coins produced by these societies. We will examine both the bold and sexy, and the small and humble, from the Parthenon to wooden huts, from the Aphrodite of Knidos to the bones of a fisherman named Peter.
                        History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                        ARTH 230-401 THE MATERIAL WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE BOILEAU, MARIE-CLAUDE
                        JANSEN, JAN
                        DIBBLE, HAROLD
                        TR 1030AM-1200PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processes of creation in the past. ANTH 221 will take place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation of materials into objects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use. Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use of fire, and craft specialization.
                          CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                          ARTH 231-401 INTRO ROMAN ARCHAEOLOGY BOWES, KIMBERLY MW 0200PM-0330PM This course provides and introduction to the art and archaeology of the ancient Roman world. From Britain to Africa, from monuments like the Colosseum to the burned remains of ancient meals, we ll consider the full spectrum of Roman material culture, exploring at the same time how archaeologists reconstruct the past. This course will make frequent use of the collections of the Penn Museum.
                            ARTH 232-401 BYZANTINE ART & ARCH DRPIC, IVAN MWF 1200PM-0100PM This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium-a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium s interactions with neighboring cultures.
                              ARTH 235-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD HOLOD, RENATA TR 1200PM-0130PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                ARTH 237-401 BERLIN: HIST POL CULTURE WEISSBERG, LILIANE TR 1030AM-1200PM What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, its transformation into an industrial city in the late nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structre, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we wil ready literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin. Indeed, Berlin will be a specific example to explore German history and cultural life of the last 300 years. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, and urban studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduage students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin.
                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                  ARTH 258-401 EAR MOD JPN ART/CIY EDO DAVIS, JULIE TR 1030AM-1200PM Study of the major art forms and architecture of Tokugawa (or Edo) period (1603-1868). In this course, we will consider how the arts of this era occur within an increasingly urban and modern culture, particularly with regard to the city of Edo. Issues of the articulation of authority in the built environment, the reinvention of classical styles, and patronage will be raised. May include some visits to PMA, Penn Museum, or other local collections.
                                    ARTH 265-601 NORTHERN BAROQUE ART WISE, RACHEL W 0430PM-0730PM Northern Baroque art comprises seventeenth-century paintings and prints from Flanders and Holland. Featured artists include: Pieter Bruegel, Hendrick Goltzius, Peter Paul Rubens, Anthony van Dyck, Frans Hals, Rembrandt, and Vermeer. Topics considered include innovations of various kinds--starting with portraits and society, landscapes, still-life, and scenes of daily life (genre pictures).
                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                      ARTH 267-401 LATIN AMERICAN ART SHAW, GWENDOLYN
                                      KIM, DAVID
                                      WF 1100AM-1200PM Fall 2017: The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina.
                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                        ARTH 277-401 THE RISE OF MODERNITY BROWNLEE, DAVID
                                        DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
                                        TR 1200PM-0130PM The nineteenth century is often considered as fast-paced, politically volatile and new-media obsessed as our own age. This course explores the nineteenth century's claim to have produced the first truly modern culture, focusing on the visual arts and metropolitan spaces of Europe and North America in their intellectual and social contexts. Stretching from the American and French Revolutions to the eve of World War I, topics to be covered include: the rise of capitalist and industrialist culture, art and revolutionary upheaval, global travel and empire, the origins of modernist art and architecture, and new media such as stereoscopes, iron and glass construction, and photography. Major artistic personalities of the age, from Jacques-Louis David and Gustave Courbet to Claude Monet and Vincent Van Gogh, and from Friedrich Schinkel and, Baron Haussmann to Frank Furness and Frank Lloyd Wright, are discussed. Each lecture will be followed by a brief period of discussion, and regular field trips take students to examine art and architecture first hand, in the museums and on the streets of Philadelphia.
                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                          ARTH 278-401 AMERICAN ART LEJA, MICHAEL TR 1200PM-0130PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it.
                                            CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                            ARTH 286-401 MDRN ART:PICASSO-POLLOCK KAUFFMAN, ALEXANDER MW 1200PM-0100PM Early twentieth-century art in Europe is marked by a number of exciting transformations. This period witnessed the rise of abstraction in painting and sculpture, as well as the inventions of collage, photomontage, constructed sculpture, the ready made and found object, and performance art. Encounters with the arts of Africa, Oceania and other traditions unfamiliar in the West spurred innovations in media, technique, and subject matter. Artists began to respond to the challenge of photography, to organize themselves into movements, and in some cases, to challenge the norms of art through "anti-art." A new gallery system replaced traditional forms of exhibiting and selling art, and artists took on new roles as publicists, manifesto writers, and exhibition organizers. This course examines these developments, with attention to formal innovations as well as cultural and political contexts.
                                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                              ARTH 289-401 TOPICS FILM STUDIES: ROMANTIC COMEDY MAZAJ, META TR 0300PM-0430PM This course is an exploration of multiple forces that explain the growth, global spread and institutionalization of international film festivals. The global boom in film industry has resulted in an incredible proliferation of film festivals taking place all around the world, and festivals have become one of the biggest growth industries. A dizzying convergence site of cinephilia, media spectacle, business agendas and geopolitical purposes, film festivals offer a fruitful ground on which to investigate the contemporary global cinema network. Film festivals will be approached as a site where numerous lines of the world cinema map come together, from culture and commerce, experimentation and entertainment, political interests and global business patterns. To analyze the network of film festivals, we will address a wide range of issues, including historical and geopolitical forces that shape the development of festivals, festivals as an alternative marketplace, festivals as a media event, programming/agenda setting, prizes, cinephilia, and city marketing. Individual case studies of international film festivals-Cannes, Berlin, Venice, Rotterdam, Karlovy Vary, Toronto, Sundance among others-will enable us to address all these diverse issues but also to establish a theoretical framework with which to approach the study of film festivals. For students planning to attend the Penn-in-Cannes program, this course provides an excellent foundation that will prepare you for the on-site experience of the King of all festivals.
                                                ARTH 300-301 UNDERGRAD METHODS SEM: Undergraduate Methods Seminar GUERIN, SARAH M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies.
                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                  ARTH 324-401 DRESS & FASHION IN AFRCA ALI-DINAR, ALI TR 0300PM-0420PM Throughout Africa, social and cultural identities of ethnicity, gender, generation, rank and status were conveyed in a range of personal ornamentation that reflects the variation of African cultures. The meaning of one particular item of clothing can transform completely when moved across time and space. As one of many forms of expressive culture, dress shape and give forms to social bodies. In the study of dress and fashion, we could note two distinct broad approaches, the historical and the anthropological. While the former focuses on fashion as a western system that shifted across time and space, and linked with capitalism and western modernity; the latter approach defines dress as an assemblage of modification the body. The Africanist proponents of this anthropological approach insisted that fashion is not a dress system specific to the west and not tied with the rise of capitalism. This course will focus on studying the history of African dress by discussing the forces that have impacted and influenced it overtime, such as socio-economic, colonialism, religion, aesthetics, politics, globalization, and popular culture. The course will also discuss the significance of the different contexts that impacted the choices of what constitute an appropriate attire for distinct situations. African dress in this context is not a fixed relic from the past, but a live cultural item that s influenced by the surrounding forces.
                                                    ARTH 325-401 TOPIC IN GRECO-ROMAN ART: Arts of the Roman House, Villa and Palace KUTTNER, ANN W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: The dwelling place -- house, apartment, villa, palace - was central to Roman understanding of self and society. The domus was a major site of artifice - architecture, landscape architecture, fine objects, statuary and paintings. The very structure was often decorated with wall-paintings, stuccowork, or mosaics, like those which survive from sites like Pompeii and Antioch. Even modest establishments might aim to impress with a mythological painting or two: opening house to visitors was fundamental to social structures, business and politics. This course looks at Roman dwellings in city and country, and explores their arts in cultural and socio-political contexts. Besides evidence of archaeology, we can use the wealth of Roman texts about the arts of living. Since the Renaissance, graphic media have responded to interest in Roman house sites and their art; we consider how new tools of virtual reconstruction affect understanding of the Roman domus and villa, and the roles museums (like our own), exhibitions and curated sites still play in that understanding.
                                                      ARTH 332-401 TOPICS IN BYZANTINE ART: The Icon: From Sinai to Malevich DRPIC, IVAN T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: This undergraduate seminar explores the Byzantine icon and its legacy. Spanning nearly two millennia, from the emergence of Christian sacred portraiture to the reception of icon painting by the early twentieth-century avant-garde, the seminar will introduce you to the history, historiography, and theories of the icon. While our focus will be on Byzantium and the wider world of Orthodox Christianity, the seminar will also engage with fundamental questions concerning the nature, status, and agency of images across cultures. Topics to be addressed include iconoclasm and the problem of idolatry; the social and ritual lives of icons; authorship, originality, and replication; viewer response and the cultural construction of vision; the frontier between art and the sacred image; and the afterlife of the icon in modernity.
                                                        ARTH 338-601 TPCS: MIDDLE EASTERN ART: From Iconoclasm to ISIS Cultural Cleansing CHALIKIAS, KONSTANTINOS M 0600PM-0900PM Fall 2017: In this course students will examine case studies of intentional and systematic destruction of art as a way to erase the cultural identity of an individual and/or a group of people. The examples focus primarily on the Middle East and range chronologically, from the destruction of the statues and stelae of Gudea in Sumer, to the annihilation of idols in the Hebrew Bible, and from iconoclasm in the Byzantine Empire to the destruction of religious monuments (khatchkars) in Azerbaijan and the more recent events orchestrated by ISIS in Syria and Iraq (i.e. Nimrud, Palmyra, Mosul). At the end of the course, students will address ways to preserve and protect threatened cultural heritage from future conflicts.
                                                          ARTH 387-401 THE HISTORY OF CHILDREN'S TELEVISION SIMENSKY, LINDA M 0430PM-0730PM This topic course explores multiple and different aspects of Animation. Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings. Fall 2016: No organization has exerted as much influence on popular culture and the art form of animation as The Walt Disney Company. For decades, Disney films were the standard by which all other animated films were measured. This course will examine the biography and philosophy of founder Walt Disney, as well as The Walt Disney Company's impact on animation art, storytelling and technology, the entertainment industry, and American popular culture. We will consider Disney's most influential early films, look at the 1960s when Disney's importance in popular culture began to erode, and analyze the films that led to the Disney renaissance of the late 1980s/early 1990s. We will also assess the subsequent purchase of Pixar Animation Studios and the overall impact Pixar has had on Disney.
                                                            ARTH 388-301 TOP:MODERN & CONTEMP ART: Spiegel-Wilks Seminar/Venice Beinnale SHAW, GWENDOLYN W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: The Venice Biennale for contemporary art is held every two years in that Italian city. It features a large, themed group show in two spaces (at the Giardini and the Arsenale venues) and nearly one hundred other exhibitions mounted by different countries from around the world. This class will focus on issues of identity and difference, including race, class, gender, and sexuality, in art on view in the various exhibitions of the Biennale. The class will travel to Venice for four days over Fall break, with travel expenses and lodging paid by Penn. Pre-registration interview and permission of instructor required. Priority is given to History of Art majors and minors.
                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                              ARTH 391-401 TOPICS IN CINEMA & MEDIA: TRANSNATIONAL CINEMA MAZAJ, META TR 1200PM-0130PM Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                                                ARTH 391-601 THE COMIC, POLITICS AND AMERICAN CINEMA KAUFFMAN, ALEXANDER CANCELED Specific course topics vary from year to year. See the Cinema Studies website at <http://cinemastudies.sas.upenn.edu/> for a description of the current offerings.
                                                                  ARTH 501-301 First Seen at the Fair: Novelties from Universal Expositions, 1851-1915 DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE W 0330PM-0630PM Curatorial seminars expose students to the complexity of studying and working with objects in the context of public display. With the guidance of faculty and museum professionals, students learn what it means to curate an exhibition, create catalogues and gallery text, and/or develop programming for exhibitions of art and visual/material culture. Fall 2017: This curatorial seminar, culminating in an exhibition at the Arthur Ross Gallery in spring/summer 2018, will present novelties and curiosities first displayed at the 19th and early 20th century's world fairs. Such events chronicled the period's innovations in art, technology, and science. Many of the most crucial inventions were first shown to the public at world fairs: electricity, the telephone, and the bicycle, among other innovative artistic techniques and everyday objects like the ice cream cone. While analyzing the appeal of such objects and their place within practices of modern consumption and display, students will study the period definitions of innovation in industrial production promoted by these large-scale spectacles. The global ambitions of universal expositions, and the image of the world they helped construct, will come under scrutiny for its frequent imperial overreach. During the semester students will collectively design the exhibition and thereby get hands-on knowledge of curation; we will produce a catalog as well.
                                                                    OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE
                                                                    ARTH 505-640 MLA Proseminar: Globalism and National Identity SHAW, GWENDOLYN T 0500PM-0800PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: This course examines they way that issues of universal, global, and national identity have been negotiated and challenged in art and visual culture. It also aims to give students an introduction to the various theories and methodological practices that have been used to critique and explain these images and objects since the end of WWII.
                                                                      ARTH 507-640 El Greco and Modernism PASTORE, CHRISTOPHER W 0530PM-0830PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: This seminar will examine the relationship between bravura brushstrokes, idiosyncratic style, artistic identity, and the rise of formalism in the modern era. Taking cues from the collection of the Barnes Foundation and Albert Barnes theories, we will begin in the Renaissance and consider the distinct styles developed by masters and their students in the 16th Century and move forward into a study of formalism and the work of Cezanne and the Post-Impressionists. Burgeoning Renaissance art theory and artist s responses to the rhetoric surrounding increasingly divergent aesthetics and uses of media will help us come to grips with early modern artists such as Tintoretto and El Greco. Ground-breaking theorists such as Lodovico Dolce and Gian Paolo Lomazzo as well as other authors including Pietro Aretino and Giorgio Vasari reveal an awareness of increasing tension in debates about art and artifice. We will read their works among others and then contrast their positions with dramatically different formal concerns raised by Roger Fry and Barnes himself. As did both Fry and Barnes, the seminar will then discuss Renaissance artists in comparison to Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works collected and hung with these old masters in the galleries of the Barnes Foundation as opposed to their normal segregation by period and region in other museums. In the process, students will ask questions about changing theoretical approaches to art and visual studies, the power of the collector and patron, and the way that modern artists found inspiration for innovation in the works of previous centuries.
                                                                        ARTH 518-401 TOPICS IN AFRICAN ART CANCELED Topic varies.
                                                                          ARTH 521-401 TOPICS IN ANCIENT MEDIT: Greek Vase Painting BROWNLEE, ANN T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: Painted vases constitute the most important and comprehensive collection of visual evidence that survives from ancient Greece. In this course, we will examine the development of Greek painted vases, with particular emphasis on the pottery of Corinth and Athens in the late 7th and 6th centuries BC. The extensive collection of Greek vases in the University of Pennsylvania Museum will be an important resource for this course.
                                                                            OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                            ARTH 550-301 TOPICS IN S. REN ART: WHAT IS PAINTING? KIM, DAVID R 0130PM-0430PM Topic Varies. Fall 2017: What is painting? Is it art or mere craft? In this class we will explore how artists and critics responded to these questions in the Italian Renaissance, specifically through looking at the work of Andrea Mantegna,¿Giovanni Bellini, Titian, and Tintoretto. In addition to reading some of the most recent scholarship on these artists, we will also visit select paintings in PMA as well as well as local ateliers and galleries¿where we will gain insight into the enduring practice of such crafts as goldwork, textiles, and glasswork.
                                                                              OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                              ARTH 554-301 TOPICS IN GLOBAL ART: Print Culture in Global Context SILVER, LARRY
                                                                              DAVIS, JULIE
                                                                              T 0130PM-0430PM Fall 2017: What is printing and how and why did it have such an impact around the world? The answers to these questions may seem at first glance to be obvious, but closer investigation of the history of print and print culture in a global context demonstrates that the pursuit of replicating text and images was more complicated as well as culturally specific. In this course, we will begin by looking at the earliest forms of printing in materials such as stamped tomb tiles and wax cylinders. The pursuit of woodblock printing in East Asia from the 9th century, the advent of the printing press in Europe during the mid-fifteenth century, and diverse media of printing, including woodcut, engraving, etching, serigraph, and lithography, are also topics under consideration. We will give close attention to two fields of print culture-- Northern Europe from the 15th through the 17thcenturies and Japan from the 17th through the 19th centuries-to investigate the ways that early modern collaborators used print to reach a broader audience and how artists employed a variety of processes to expand the potential of the medium. Students will be encouraged to pursue their own topics beyond the scope of the course to engage other contexts from around the globe.
                                                                                OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                ARTH 573-402 TPS IN CRITICISM & THEOR: OBJECT THEORY MACLEOD, CATRIONA T 0100PM-0300PM Topic varies.
                                                                                  ARTH 579-301 TOPICS IN AMERICAN ART: Reinstalling the American Galleries at the PMA FOSTER, KATHLEEN R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: In this seminar, led by Kathleen A. Foster, the Robert L. McNeil, Jr., Senior Curator of American Art, students will be immersed in the planning process for the reinstallation of the American galleries at the PMA. Topics will include the history of the American collection and an analysis of its strengths, a critique of its current installation (designed in 1975-1976), and introduction to planning for a new layout and narrative of the early American galleries, set to open in 2020. Students will learn methods of object examination, research, and cataloguing using paintings of their choice from the collection from the 18th to the 20th centuries, with special attention to recent gifts from the bequest of Daniel W. Dietrich. Different types of interpretation, from the gallery label and the digital interactive to the traditional scholarly catalogue entry or the newer on-line publication format will be studied, along with theories and methods of display appropriate to these strategies, using the students' chosen objects.
                                                                                    OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                    ARTH 624-401 ART OF MESOPOTAMIA PITTMAN, HOLLY TR 0130PM-0300PM A survey of the art of Mesopotamia from 4000 B.C. through the conquest of Alexander the Great.
                                                                                      ARTH 626-401 HELL & ROM ART/ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys the political, religious and domestic arts, patronage and display in Rome's Mediterranean, from the 2nd c. BCE to Constantine's 4th-c. Christianized empire. Our subjects are images and decorated objects in their cultural, political and socio-economic contexts (painting, mosaic, sculpture, luxury and mass-produced arts in many media). We start with the Hellenistic cosmopolitan culture of the Greek kingdoms and their neighbors, and late Etruscan and Republican Italy; next we map Imperial Roman art as developed around the capital city Rome, as well as in the provinces of the vast empire.
                                                                                        ARTH 632-401 BYZANTINE ART & ARCH DRPIC, IVAN MWF 1200PM-0100PM This course offers a wide-ranging introduction to the art, architecture, and material culture of Byzantium a Christian, predominantly Greek-speaking civilization that flourished in the Eastern Mediterranean for over a thousand years. Positioned between the Muslim East and the Latin West, Antiquity and the Early Modern era, Byzantium nurtured a vibrant and highly sophisticated artistic culture. With emphasis placed upon paradigmatic objects and monuments, we will examine an array of artistic media, from mosaic and panel painting to metalwork, ivory carving, book illumination, and embroidery. We will consider the making, consumption, and reception of Byzantine art in a variety of contexts political, devotional, ritual, and domestic. Topics include the idea of empire and its visual articulation; court culture; the veneration of images and relics; patronage, piety, and self-representation; authorship and artistic agency; materiality and the sensory experience of art; the reception of the pagan Greco-Roman past; and the changing nature of Byzantium s interactions with neighboring cultures.
                                                                                          ARTH 635-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD HOLOD, RENATA TR 1200PM-0130PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                                                                                            OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                            ARTH 658-401 EAR MOD JPN ART/CIY EDO DAVIS, JULIE TR 1030AM-1200PM Study of the major art forms and architecture of Tokugawa (or Edo) period (1603-1868). In this course, we will consider how the arts of this era occur within an increasingly urban and modern culture, particularly with regard to the city of Edo. Issues of the articulation of authority in the built environment, the reinvention of classical styles, and patronage will be raised. May include some visits to PMA, Penn Museum, or other local collections.
                                                                                              ARTH 667-401 LATIN AMERICAN ART SHAW, GWENDOLYN
                                                                                              KIM, DAVID
                                                                                              WF 1100AM-1200PM Fall 2017: The numerous traditions of Latin American art have been formed from the historical confluence of Indigenous, European, African, and Asian cultural traditions, each one impacting the others. This course serves as an introduction to these hybrid New World art forms and movements by both providing a large chronological sweep (1492-present) and focusing on several specific countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Cuba, Peru, and Argentina. what they represent).
                                                                                                ARTH 677-401 THE RISE OF MODERNITY BROWNLEE, DAVID
                                                                                                DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
                                                                                                TR 1200PM-0130PM The nineteenth century is often considered as fast-paced, politically volatile and new-media obsessed as our own age. This course explores the nineteenth century's claim to have produced the first truly modern culture, focusing on the visual arts and metropolitan spaces of Europe and North America in their intellectual and social contexts. Stretching from the American and French Revolutions to the eve of World War I, topics to be covered include: the rise of capitalist and industrialist culture, art and revolutionary upheaval, global travel and empire, the origins of modernist art and architecture, and new media such as stereoscopes, iron and glass construction, and photography. Major artistic personalities of the age, from Jacques-Louis David and Gustave Courbet to Claude Monet and Vincent Van Gogh, and from Friedrich Schinkel and, Baron Haussmann to Frank Furness and Frank Lloyd Wright, are discussed. Each lecture will be followed by a brief period of discussion, and regular field trips take students to examine art and architecture first hand, in the museums and on the streets of Philadelphia.
                                                                                                  ARTH 678-401 AMERICAN ART LEJA, MICHAEL TR 1200PM-0130PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it.
                                                                                                    CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                    ARTH 686-401 MDRN ART:PICASSO-POLLOCK KAUFFMAN, ALEXANDER MW 1200PM-0100PM Early twentieth-century art in Europe is marked by a number of exciting transformations. This period witnessed the rise of abstraction in painting and sculpture, as well as the inventions of collage, photomontage, constructed sculpture, the ready made and found object, and performance art. Encounters with the arts of Africa, Oceania and other traditions unfamiliar in the West spurred innovations in media, technique, and subject matter. Artists began to respond to the challenge of photography, to organize themselves into movements, and in some cases, to challenge the norms of art through "anti-art." A new gallery system replaced traditional forms of exhibiting and selling art, and artists took on new roles as publicists, manifesto writers, and exhibition organizers. This course examines these developments, with attention to formal innovations as well as cultural and political contexts. This course requires permission from the instructor.
                                                                                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                      ARTH 701-401 PROSEMINAR IN METHODS LEJA, MICHAEL F 1000AM-1200PM The meanings we ascribe to art works of any culture or time period are a direct result of our own preoccupations and methods. This colloquium will give both a broad overview of contemporary debates in the history of art-including such issues as technologies of vision, feminism, gender and sexuality studies, globalism, the pictorial turn or material/vision culture-and locate these methods within art history's own intellectual history,as well as the history of aesthetics. The course will consist of wide-ranging weekly readings and discussion, and also clarify such key terms as iconography, formalism, connoisseurship, and the Frankfurt and Vienna Schools.
                                                                                                        ARTH 711-401 TOPICS IN INDIAN ART: South Asian Architecture: Practice and Symbolism MEISTER, MICHAEL R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: We will examine the practice and symbolism of South Asian Architecture with case studies of how to build and how to make buildings meaningful.
                                                                                                          ARTH 720-401 TOPICS IN AEGEAN ART: Depictions of Men and Women in Frescoes SHANK, ELIZABETH M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: Depictions of men and women in Aegean Bronze Age art, dating to circa 3,000-1,100 BCE, are extremely evocative. In this class we will examine what fresco art can tell us about the roles of men and women in this prehistoric culture. We will keep several questions in mind: 1) How do images of men and women evolve? 2) Does the artwork available to us allow us to safely draw conclusions about Minoan and Mycenaean society? 3) What are the similarities and differences between the depictions of Minoan and Mycenaean men and women? 4) Can we make a case that certain people were viewed as different (elevated in society, perhaps on a religious or secular level) based on the artistic examples that have been uncovered? We will also study theories that have been proposed about the roles of men and women of the Aegean Bronze Age, a people known for their artistic excellence and ambiguous images. Class discussions will be based on assigned readings, and you will write 3 short papers reviewing assigned articles. Students will also write and present two research papers to the class.
                                                                                                            ARTH 726-401 ARCH GREECE ASIA MINOR ROSE, CHARLES M 0130PM-0430PM An examination of new discoveries and conflicting interpretations in the archaeology of Greece and Asia Minor between the seventh and fourth centuries B.C.E. Both sides of the Aegean will receive equal attention, and emphasis will be placed on sanctuaries, settlements, and cemeteries.
                                                                                                              FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                                                                                                              ARTH 771-301 TOPICS IN 19TH C. ARCH: ECLECTICISM BROWNLEE, DAVID W 0900AM-1200PM Topic varies. Fall 2017: This seminar will explore the exhilarating architectural environment of the period ca. 1750-1900, when a ferocious appetite for artistic invention was let loose in kitchen filled with new knowledge about the entire history of human architecture. Focusing on French, German, and English architecture, the seminar will examine major texts and study important monuments, all considered in their cultural and political contexts.¿
                                                                                                                ARTH 797-401 20TH C AESTHETICS: SOCIABILITY & SEXUALITY BERSANI, LEO CANCELED Fall 2017: This course explores notions that have conditioned 20th century attitudes toward beauty among them ornament, form, fetish, the artifact "women", the moves to 20th century fiction, art manifestos, theory, and such phenomena as beauty contests and art adjudications.