ARTH425 - Achaemenids and Hellenistic Aftermath

In the sixth century BC, the Achaemenid Persian dynasty created the largest empire of antiquity, covering a larger land area at its height than other the later Roman Empire or Han China. Extending from Sudan to Pakistan. In a sense, this empire initiated one of the worlds first episodes of globalization, drawing together Eurasia even beyond its boundaries, helping to connect an area from Greece to India. After Alexander's conquest, the structures of the former Achaemenid hegemony significantly influenced the states that arose in its former territory. Although critical for our understanding of ancient political organization and long distance economic and cultural exchange, the Achaemenid empire and its main successors, the Seleucid, Parthian and Sassanian empires, have received less modern scholarly attention than neighboring polities. The purpose of this class is to explore multiple aspects of the visual and material culture in the empire's territories by looking broadly at the evidence from the various geographical areas that came under imperial control both during and after the Achaemenid Empire.
Section 401 - LEC
In the sixth century BC, the Achaemenid Persian dynasty created the largest empire of antiquity, covering a larger land area at its height than other the later Roman Empire or Han China. For 200 years the Achaemenid Empire governed an area equal in size to the continental United States, from Sudan to Pakistan. In a sense, this empire initiated one of the world’s first episodes of globalization, drawing together Eurasia even beyond its boundaries, helping to connect an area from Greece to India. After Alexander’s conquest, the structures of the former Achaemenid hegemony significantly influenced the states that arose in its former territory. Although critical for our understanding of ancient political organization and long distance economic and cultural exchange, the Achaemenid empire and its main successors, the Seleucid, Parthian and Sassanian empires, have received less modern scholarly attention than neighboring polities. The purpose of this class is to explore multiple aspects of the visual and material culture in the empire's territories by looking broadly at the evidence from the various geographical areas that came under imperial control both during and after the Achaemenid Empire.
M 0200PM-0500PM
KUTTNER, ANN L.
RISTVET, LAUREN M.
JAFFE BUILDING 113
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