Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 100-401 VIOLENCE IN AFRICAN ART HOMANN, LISA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies.
  • AFRC100401
CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
ARTH 100-402 SPIEGEL FRESHMAN SEMINAR: Images in Conflict: A Visual History of Violence LEVY, AARON WILLIAMS HALL 27 T 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies.
  • ENGL016402
CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
ARTH 102-001 RENAISSANCE-CONTEMPORARY SHAW, GWENDOLYN
DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
STITELER HALL B6 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course is an introduction to the visual arts including painting, sculpture, print culture, and new media such as photography, film, performance and installation art in Europe and the United States from 1400 to the present. It offers a broad historical overview of the key movements and artists of the period, as well as an investigation into the crucial themes and contexts that mark visual art production after the middle ages. Such themes include the secularization of art; the (gendered) role of the artist in society; the sites of art production and consumption such as the artist's studio, the royal courts and the art exhibition; the materials of art; the import of technology and science to art's making, content and distribution; the rise of art criticism; and the socio-political contexts of patronage and audience; among others.
    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
    ARTH 102-601 Introduction to Western Art & Civilization: Renaissance to Present TOKUMITSU, MIYA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 141 MW 0600PM-0730PM This course is an introduction to the visual arts including painting, sculpture, print culture, and new media such as photography, film, performance and installation art in Europe and the United States from 1400 to the present. It offers a broad historical overview of the key movements and artists of the period, as well as an investigation into the crucial themes and contexts that mark visual art production after the middle ages. Such themes include the secularization of art; the (gendered) role of the artist in society; the sites of art production and consumption such as the artist's studio, the royal courts and the art exhibition; the materials of art; the import of technology and science to art's making, content and distribution; the rise of art criticism; and the socio-political contexts of patronage and audience; among others.
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 107-401 INTRO TO FILM THEORY MAZAJ, META FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course offers students an introduction to the major texts in film theory across the 20th and 21st centuries. The course gives students an opportunity to read these central texts closely, to understand the range of historical contexts in which film theories are developed, to explore the relationship between film theory and the major film movements, to grapple with the points of contention that have emerged among theorists, and finally to consider: what is the status of film theory today? This course is required for all Cinema Studies majors, but is open to all students, and no prior knowledge of film theory is assumed. Requirements: Close reading of all assigned texts; attendance and participation in section discussions; 1 midterm exam; 1 take-home final exam.
      • CINE103401
      • COML116401
      • ENGL095401
      SENIOR ASSOCIATES
      ARTH 108-601 WORLD FILM HIST TO 1945 MAZAJ, META ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111 T 0430PM-0730PM This course surveys the history of world film from cinema s precursors to 1945. We will develop methods for analyzing film while examining the growth of film as an art, an industry, a technology, and a political instrument. Topics include the emergence of film technology and early film audiences, the rise of narrative film and birth of Hollywood, national film industries and movements, African-American independent film, the emergence of the genre film (the western, film noir, and romantic comedies), ethnographic and documentary film, animated films, censorship, the MPPDA and Hays Code, and the introduction of sound. We will conclude with the transformation of several film industries into propaganda tools during World War II (including the Nazi, Soviet, and US film industries). In addition to contemporary theories that investigate the development of cinema and visual culture during the first half of the 20th century, we will read key texts that contributed to the emergence of film theory. There are no prerequisites. Students are required to attend screenings or watch films on their own.
      • CINE101601
      • COML123601
      • ENGL091601
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
      ARTH 109-401 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES CORRIGAN, TIMOTHY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 TR 0900AM-1030AM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film.
      • CINE102401
      • COML124401
      • ENGL092401
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
      ARTH 222-401 ART OF ANCIENT IRAN: Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age Iran PITTMAN, HOLLY JAFFE BUILDING 113 MW 1200PM-0100PM This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age.
      • AAMW622401
      • ARTH622401
      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 229-401 ROMAN ARCH & URBANISM HASELBERGER, LOTHAR JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0130PM-0300PM Introduction to the art of building and city planning in the Roman world, 6th c. BC - 2nd c. AD. Emphasis on concepts of organizing space, on issues of structure, materials, decoration, proportion, and the Etruscan and Greek heritage as well as on theory and practice of urbanism as reflected in ancient cities (Rome, Ostia, Roman Alexandria, Timgad) and writings (Vitruvius, and others). Excursions to the Penn Museum and Philadelphia. No prerequisites.
      • AAMW629401
      • ARTH629401
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 235-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD HOLOD, RENATA JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1200PM-0130PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
      • AAMW635401
      • ARTH635401
      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 254-401 GLOBAL RENAISSANCE/BAROQ KIM, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1030AM-1200PM An introduction to transcultural encounters within and beyond early modern Europe, 1450-1600. Topics include: the theory and historiography of global art; artistic relations between Venice, the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires, and islands in the Eastern Mediterranean; Portugal's overseas mercantile network in Africa and Asia; and the Baroque in Latin America, with emphasis upon Brazil. Our discussions focus on these paradigmatic case studies so as to question the language and terms we use to characterize confrontations between native and foreign, the self and the other.
      • ARTH654401
      ARTH 261-401 NORTHERN RENAISSANCE ART SILVER, LARRY JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0900AM-1030AM Survey of the principal developments in Northern Europe during the "early modern" period, i.e. the transition from medieval to modern art-making during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Principal attention to painting and graphics with additional consideration of developments in sculpture, particularly in the regions of the Netherlands and German-speaking Europe. Attention focused on the works of the following artists: Van Eyck, Bosch, Durer, Holbein, Bruegel, and on topics such as the rise of pictorial genres, urban art markets, Reformation art and art for the dynastic courts of emerging nation-states.
      • ARTH661401
      • DTCH261401
      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 281-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT HAGAN, CAROL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 MW 1100AM-1200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
      • ARTH681401
      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 288-601 MODERN DESIGN MARCUS, GEORGE WILLIAMS HALL 202 W 0530PM-0830PM This survey of modern utilitarian and decorative objects spans the century, from the Arts and Crafts Movement to the present, from the rise of Modernism to its rejection in Post-Modernism, from Tiffany glass and tubular-metal furniture to the Sony Walkman. Its overall approach focuses on the aesthetics of designed objects and on the designers who created them, but the course also investigates such related topics as industrialization, technology, ergonomics, and environmental, postindustrial, and universal design. Among the major international figures whose graphics, textiles, furniture, and other products will be studied are William Morris, Frank Lloyd Wright, Josef Hoffmann, Le Corbusier and Charlotte Perriand, Mies van der Rohe, Alvar Aalto, Raymond Loewy, Charles and Ray Eames, Isamu Noguchi, Eero Saarinen, Paul Rand, Jack Lenor Larsen, Ettore Sottsass,Jr., Robert Venturi, Frank Gehry, and Philippe Starck.
        ARTH 290-401 Post War Japanese Cinema DAVIS, JULIE VAN PELT LIBRARY FLMCR TR 1030AM-1200PM Mizoguchi Kenji, Ozu Yasujiro, and Kurosawa Akira are recognized today as three of the most important and influential directors in Japanese cinema. In their films of the late 1940s and 1950s, these directors focused upon issues surrounding the human condition and the perception of truth, history, beauty, death, and other issues of the postwar period. This course places their films in period context, and pays particular attention to the connections to other visual media, and to how "art" and "history" are being defined in the cinematic context. How other directors also took up these issues, and referred to the "big three" is also be discussed.
        • ARTH690401
        • CINE223401
        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
        ARTH 294-401 CONTEMPORARY ART SILVERMAN, KAJA STITELER HALL B26 MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art making of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculptures, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasinglyimportant exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happenings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
        • ARTH694401
        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
        ARTH 298-050 RENAISSANCE ART IN LONDON COLLECTIONS
          STUDY ABROAD
          ARTH 298-051 HISTORY AND THEORY STUDIES
            STUDY ABROAD
            ARTH 298-052 ART OF THE 20TH CENTURY
              STUDY ABROAD
              ARTH 298-053 WRITING THE MEDIEVAL BODY
                STUDY ABROAD
                ARTH 298-054 INDEPENDENT STUDY
                  STUDY ABROAD
                  ARTH 298-055 OBJECT POSITIONS
                    STUDY ABROAD
                    ARTH 298-056 THE EMERGENCE OF MODERNITY
                      STUDY ABROAD
                      ARTH 301-401 THE AVANT-GARDE FILM FRANCIS, TERRI TOWNE BUILDING 319 W 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies.
                      • AFRC349401
                      • CINE350401
                      • COML351401
                      • ENGL295401
                      ARTH 303-301 INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUMS BROWNLEE, DAVID
                      BROWNLEE, ANN
                      WILLIAMS HALL 25 W 0200PM-0500PM This course introduces students to the history, theory and modern practice of museums. Using the resources of the Penn Museum, the course discusses curatorial practice, education, exhibition design and conservation, while exploring the theoretical and ethical issues confronted by museums. Particularly relevant for those interested in archaeology, anthropology, art history, cultural heritage and public education.
                        ARTH 311-401 CONTEMP ART IN S. ASIA MEISTER, MICHAEL T 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies.
                        • SAST312401
                        ARTH 325-401 Violence in Ancient Mediterranean Art KUTTNER, ANN FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies.
                        • CLST341401
                        ARTH 328-401 ATHENIAN ACROPOLIS HASELBERGER, LOTHAR JAFFE BUILDING 104 T 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies.
                        • CLST342401
                        ARTH 351-301 TOP: ERLY MOD ART THEORY KIM, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING 113 R 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies.
                          ARTH 396-402 TOP:GEN/SEXLTY MOD/CONTE POGGI, CHRISTINE JAFFE BUILDING 113 M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies.
                          • GSWS395402
                          ARTH 503-402 EKPHRASIS MACLEOD, CATRIONA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 T 0130PM-0330PM Topic varies.
                          • COML582402
                          • ENGL590402
                          • GRMN580402
                          ARTH 504-401 BLACK CINEMAS, METHODS, AND ISSUES FRANCIS, TERRI FISHER-BENNETT HALL 224 M 0500PM-0800PM Topic varies
                          • AFRC526401
                          • CINE530401
                          • COML529401
                          • ENGL570401
                          ARTH 505-640 MLA Proseminar: That 70s Movie SHAW, GWENDOLYN VAN PELT LIBRARY FLMCR R 0500PM-0800PM Topic varies.
                          • AFRC573640
                          • CINE502640
                          • GSWS574640
                          ARTH 511-401 TOPICS IN INDIAN ART MEISTER, MICHAEL JAFFE BUILDING 104 F 1200PM-0200PM Topic varies. Spring 2015: Seeing and being seen, vocalizing and hearing, contribute to the construction of meaning in any society. Important as texts have been to South Asia's history, perceptions of the physical world dominate experience within South Asian cultures. This course will approach this perceptual world as expressed in art and methods frame art and perception as a source of knowledge.
                          • SAST505401
                          ARTH 513-301 MODERN JAPANESE PRINTS DAVIS, JULIE W 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies.
                            Fine Arts Library - Davis Seminar Room; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                            ARTH 518-401 THE ARTIST IN AFRICA CLARKE, CHRISTA JAFFE BUILDING 113 T 0300PM-0500PM Topic varies.
                            • AFRC516401
                            ARTH 537-401 TOPICS IN ART OF IRAN HOLOD, RENATA
                            KUTTNER, ANN
                            JAFFE BUILDING 104 W 0300PM-0500PM Topic varies.
                            • AAMW537401
                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                            ARTH 581-404 ARCHITECTS, HISTORIANS, AND THE INVENTION OF MODERN ARCHITECTURE BROWNLEE, DAVID
                            BARBER, DANIEL
                            PSYCHOLOGY LAB C41 T 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies.
                            • ARCH712404
                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                            ARTH 622-401 ART OF ANCIENT IRAN: Art and Archaeology of the Bronze Age Iran PITTMAN, HOLLY JAFFE BUILDING 113 MW 1200PM-0100PM This course offers a survey of ancient Iranian art and culture from the painted pottery cultures of the Neolithic era to the monuments of the Persian Empire. Particular emphasis is placed on the Early Bronze Age.
                            • AAMW622401
                            • ARTH222401
                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            ARTH 629-401 ROMAN ARCH & URBANISM HASELBERGER, LOTHAR JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0130PM-0300PM Introduction to the art of building and city planning in the Roman world, 6th c. BC - 2nd c. AD. Emphasis on concepts of organizing space, on issues of structure, materials, decoration, proportion, and the Etruscan and Greek heritage as well as on theory and practice of urbanism as reflected in ancient cities (Rome, Ostia, Roman Alexandria, Timgad) and writings (Vitruvius, and others). Excursions to the Penn Museum and Philadelphia. No prerequisites.
                            • AAMW629401
                            • ARTH229401
                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            ARTH 635-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD HOLOD, RENATA JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1200PM-0130PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                            • AAMW635401
                            • ARTH235401
                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; GEN REQ I: SOCIETY; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            ARTH 654-401 GLOBAL RENAISSANCE/BAROQ KIM, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1030AM-1200PM An introduction to transcultural encounters within and beyond early modern Europe, 1450-1600. Topics include: the theory and historiography of global art; artistic relations between Venice, the Byzantine and Ottoman Empires, and islands in the Eastern Mediterranean; Portugal's overseas mercantile network in Africa and Asia; and the Baroque in Latin America, with emphasis upon Brazil. Our discussions focus on these paradigmatic case studies so as to question the language and terms we use to characterize confrontations between native and foreign, the self and the other.
                            • ARTH254401
                            ARTH 661-401 NORTHERN RENAISSANCE ART SILVER, LARRY JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0900AM-1030AM Survey of the principal developments in Northern Europe during the "early modern" period, i.e. the transition from medieval to modern art-making during the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Principal attention to painting and graphics with additional consideration of developments in sculpture, particularly in the regions of the Netherlands and German-speaking Europe. Attention focused on the works of the following artists: Van Eyck, Bosch, Durer, Holbein, Bruegel, and on topics such as the rise of pictorial genres, urban art markets, Reformation art and art for the dynastic courts of emerging nation-states.
                            • ARTH261401
                            • DTCH261401
                            CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            ARTH 681-401 MODERN ARCH:1900-PRESENT HAGAN, CAROL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 401 MW 1100AM-1200PM The architecture of Europe and America from the late nineteenth century until the present is the central subject of this course, but some time is also devoted to Latin American and Asian architecture and to the important issues of modern city planning. Topics discussed include the Arts and Crafts movement, Art Nouveau, Expressionism, Art Deco, the International Style, and Post-modernism. The debate over the role of technology in modern life and art, the search for a universal language of architectural communication, and the insistent demand that architecture serve human society are themes that are traced throughout the course. Among the important figures to be considered are Frank Lloyd Wright, Walter Gropius, Le Corbusier, Louis Kahn, Robert Venturi, and Denise Scott Brown. The course includes weekly discussion sessions and several excursions to view architecture in Philadelphia.
                            • ARTH281401
                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            ARTH 690-401 Post War Japanese Cinema DAVIS, JULIE VAN PELT LIBRARY FLMCR TR 1030AM-1200PM Mizoguchi Kenji, Ozu Yasujiro, and Kurosawa Akira are recognized today as three of the most important and influential directors in Japanese cinema. In their films of the late 1940s and 1950s, these directors focused upon issues surrounding the human condition and the perception of truth, history, beauty, death, and other issues of the postwar period. This course places their films in period context, and pays particular attention to the connections to other visual media, and to how "art" and "history" are being defined in the cinematic context. How other directors also took up these issues, and referred to the "big three" is also be discussed.
                            • ARTH290401
                            • CINE223401
                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; GEN REQ I: SOCIETY; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            ARTH 694-401 CONTEMPORARY ART SILVERMAN, KAJA STITELER HALL B26 MW 1000AM-1100AM One of the most striking features of today's art world is the conspicuous place occupied in it by the photographic image. Large-scale color photographs and time-based installations in projections are everywhere. Looking back, we can see that much of the art makeing of the past 60 years has also been defined by this medium, regardless of the form it takes. Photographic images have inspired countless paintings, appeared in combines and installations, morphed into sculputres, drawings and performances, and served both as the object and the vehicle of institutional critique. They are also an increasingly important exhibition site: where most of us go to see earthworks, happings and body-art. This course is a three-part exploration of our photographic present.
                            • ARTH294401
                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            ARTH 721-401 TOP: ARCHAEOL SCIENCE VATANKHAH MOHAMMAD ABADI, GHOLA MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105 T 1000AM-1200PM Topic varies.
                            • AAMW721401
                            ARTH 729-401 TOP:ROM ARCH/TOPOGRAPHY ROSE, CHARLES CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 M 0100PM-0400PM Topic varies.
                            • AAMW729401
                            • CLST728401
                            FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY
                            ARTH 732-401 TOPIC IN BYZ ART & ARCH: BETH SHEAN > ANTIQUITY OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT T 0130PM-0330PM Topic varies.
                            • AAMW732401
                            GEN REQ I: SOCIETY; Fine Arts Library - Davis Seminar Room
                            ARTH 761-401 GERMAN PRINTS & DRAWINGS SILVER, LARRY JAFFE BUILDING 104 R 0130PM-0330PM Topic varies.
                            • DTCH601401
                            • GRMN679401
                            ARTH 775-301 TOP IN 19TH C. EUR ART: ART/TIME 19TH C. DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE JAFFE BUILDING 113 W 0300PM-0500PM Topic varies. Spring 2015: Despite the fact that one exhibition on Impressionism chases the next these days, the academic study of this crucial early modernist movement has slowed since the 1970s and 1980s, when new art historical paradigms (like feminism and the social history of art) were tested on Manet, Monet and their followers. This seminar seeks to understand this development but also countermand it by establishing an account of Impressionism that fits our current global, multimedia and multidisciplinary forms of humanistic thought. To this end, we will read those recent scholars who place Impressionism within new contexts that include the history of science and technology (visual perception, psychology, evolution, chemistry), political history and theory (republicanism, revolution, empire, nationalism), and consumer culture (fashion, capitalism). We will also go back to the movement s early critics (like Laforgue and Geffroy), in order to appreciate their strange metaphoric languages (which saw in Impressionism, for instance, the seeds of social upheaval or the most advanced eye in human evolution ) and make them newly useful for a 21st-century interpretation of Impressionism s true intellectual heft and radical aesthetics.
                              ARTH 788-301 TOP IN 20TH C. AMER ART: PMA/MELLON SEMINAR SHAW, GWENDOLYN JAFFE BUILDING 113 F 1000AM-1200PM Topic varies.
                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                ARTH 793-401 TOPICS IN CINEMA & MEDIA: WAR AND FILM BECKMAN, KAREN JAFFE BUILDING 104 M 0200PM-0500PM Topic varies
                                • CINE793401
                                • ENGL797401
                                • GSWS793401
                                ARTH 794-401 TOPICS:CONTEMPORARY ART: PHOTO-PAINTING SILVERMAN, KAJA JAFFE BUILDING 104 T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies. Spring 2015: This course is about pictorial photography: large-format analogue and digital images that look scenic or staged, require a prolonged and attentive viewing, and are destined for the wall of a museum. Until quite recently, most of us associated this kind of photography with the 70s, 80s and early 90s, i.e., with poststructuralist theory and the aesthetics of postmodernism. It seemed a perfect illustration of the axiom that a photograph is only a representation or, better yet, a representation of a representation, since everything is a cultural construction. But not only has pictorial photography continued unabated, it has gained more and more momentum. It has also proven resistant to all of our attempts to de-realize it to treat it as a tool, a commodity, a fiction or any other kind of human artifact. Pictorial photography is an important chapter within a larger narrative one that began with the first pinhole camera, and will end only when we do. Since this chapter begins with Pictorialism and Camera Work, that is also where we will start, but most of the seminar will be devoted to contemporary practitioners.
                                • COML787401
                                • ENGL790401
                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION