Penn Calendar Penn A-Z School of Arts and Sciences University of Pennsylvania

Events & Workshops

  • Monday, September 1, 2014 (All day)

    The first decade of the twenty-first century has been widely hailed as a new dawn for Latin America, putting an end to the dominance of neoliberal policies in the region’s politics. This was signaled by the election of such leftist leaders as Hugo Chavez in Venezuela and Luiz Inácio “Lula” da Silva in Brazil – and their successors – and the success of indigenous politicians in Bolivia, Ecuador and Peru. DCC is devoting 2013-14 to a regional theme, “Post-Neoliberal Latin America,” that highlights the importance of these developments not only for Latin America but for the world. The Program welcomes both empirical and normative scholarship, focused comparatively or on particular nations, regions, or communities, that explores the recent transformations in Latin America; the changing nature of its politics; the impact of political developments on civic and social inclusion; the continuing legacies of mass violence and civil war; the prospects and consequences of regional integration; the changing role of Latin America in the global political economy; and the scope and durability of the post-neoliberal turn.
  • Friday, September 12, 2014 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

    Woodlands Ballroom at the Inn at Penn (Lobby Level), 3600 Sansom Street.
    FREE EVENT, but please register here.

    Co-sponsored by the Penn Latin American and Latino Studies Program and La Casa Latina.

    FORMER BOLIVIAN PRESIDENT CARLOS MESA is in a unique position to grapple with Latin America’s alternatives for regional development. He is a longtime print and television journalist with a deep knowledge of the history of his nation and the region. As president, Mesa sought to balance economic growth, spurred by the discovery of natural gas reserves in Bolivia, with the needs of the poor and the rights of indigenous peoples. As the opening speaker for Penn DCC's 2014-15 series on the theme, "Post-Neoliberal Latin America," Mesa will help chart a course between right and left; between neoliberal capitalism and resurgent socialism; between the interests of Latin America's diverse nations and that of the region as a whole; and between the claims of the past and the possibilities for the future. [Reception to follow.]
  • Thursday, October 2, 2014 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

    Silverstein Forum, Stiteler Hall First Floor (Accessibility)

    EVELYNE HUBER PRESENTS her ongoing work, conducted with John Stephens, investigating the links between social investment, human capital and social inequality in Latin America.
  • Thursday, November 6, 2014 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Silverstein Forum, Stiteler Hall First Floor (Accessibility)

    THIS WORKSHOP presents two papers that examine the political and economic forces impelling Latin America beyond neoliberal policies.
  • Thursday, December 4, 2014 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Silverstein Forum, Stiteler Hall First Floor (Accessibility)

    THIS WORKSHOP PRESENTS two papers that examine the resurgence of democracy in the region and its effects.
  • Thursday, February 12, 2015 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Silverstein Forum, Stiteler Hall First Floor (Accessibility)

    THIS WORKSHOP PRESENTS two papers that examine the causes, effects and remedies of violence in a region so often torn by civil war.

  • Thursday, March 19, 2015 - 4:30pm to 6:30pm

    Silverstein Forum, Stiteler Hall First Floor (Accessibility)

    THIS WORKSHOP PRESENTS two papers that examine the transnational connections that tie the region together, as well as those that bind it to the global economy.
  • Friday, May 8, 2015 - 9:00am to 5:00pm

    AS THE CULMINATION OF our year-long examination of the transformations sweeping through Latin America, international scholars gather to discuss the implications for democracy, stable governance and popular wellbeing in the region. Panelists include Sandra Botero (University of Notre Dame Dept. of Political Science), George Ciccariello-Maher (Drexel University Dept. of History and Politics), Roberto Gargarella (University Torcuato Di Tella Law School), Juliet Hooker (University of Texas at Austin Dept. of Government), Thamy Pogrebinschi (WZB Berlin Social Science Center, Democracy and Democratization Research Unit), Nancy Postero (UC-San Diego Dept. of Anthropology), Philippe Schmitter (European University Institute, Political and Social Sciences), and Gisela Zaremberg (FLACSO México).