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Summer 2001 Course Guide
Course Offerings

Displaying records 1 through 8 of 8 records found. (8 records displayed).

Summer Session 2, School of Arts & Sciences
Folklore and Folklife (221)
FOLK (221) 101 920, TR 10:00-2:00, Jenner
Introduction to Folklore
   Fulfills Distribution Requirement II: History & Tradition
   
   
Folklore is expressive culture in everyday life. We will explore the meaning(s)of the term "folk" and "lore," the discipline as defined by the study of verbal genres (proverbs, folktales, tall tales, fables, legends, ballads, epics, jokes, riddles), and the expansion of the term "folklore" to include, among other things, cultural heritage sites, contemporary beliefs, and alternative health systems. We will read folklorists' collections of oral and material culture (for example, German fairy tales of the Brothers Grimm, Indian animal fables of the Pancatantra, folk art of Philadelphia), noting the evolution of collection procedures from the past to the present. In addition, we will draw on written studies that analyze and interpret expressive forms, ethnographic film, and the world wide web in order to fuel our lively in-class discussions. The course will include a fieldwork project in which you will collect a form of folklore from your own culture, perhaps from a friend or family member. The collection and the subsequent write-up of the fieldwork will give you personal insight into how each of us participates in artistic cultural expression in various folk groups today.
 

Summer Session 1, School of Arts & Sciences
Folklore and Folklife (221)
FOLK (221) 231 910, MW 10:00-1:00, Samper
American Popular Culture
   
   
   Cross-Listed with: SOCI 229 910
The course will explore the history and practice of popular culture and cultural studies in the United States. We will begin by challenging the concepts of "folk", "mass", and "popular" as well as "American" and "culture." Through analysis of audience response to performed or viewed events we will explore how and why people actively negotiate and interpret popular materials. This class will attempt to situate popular culture within a larger social, cultural and political framework. Some areas of popular culture we will investigate incude MTV, talk shows, fashion, club cultures, rap and other music, pro-wrestling, professional sports, Hollywood movies, television, advertising, and there will be room to explore areas students may find interesting. We will end by looking into the exportation of American popular culture and its reception, interpretation, adaptation and consumption around the world.
 

Summer Session 2, School of Arts & Sciences
Folklore and Folklife (221)
FOLK (221) 250 920, MW 10:00-1:20, Gregory
Urban Environments: Philadelphia
   
   
   
In this class we take seriously the artistry and creativity of everyday city life. The streets of Philadelphia are our primary text--streets that have come a long way from William Penn's intended "greene country towne." Through in-class fieldtrips and individual research projects, we'll explore the contemporary urban landscape, looking for signs of life in an environment too often dismissed as merely the unfortunate byproduct of industrialization, a place insensitive to human needs: Philadelphia's famous (or infamous) grid. How do people create a sense of place in the city? We'll consider environmental perception and the problem of "nature" in the city. We'll contemplate remembered landscapes, narrated landscapes, and personal alterations of the built environment in the creation of multiple urban environments within the gridiron of one metropolis. We'll sharpen sensory skills of looking, listening, and even tasting, using heightened awareness of our own presence in the world as a springboard for engaged research, developing writing and analytical skills directly applicable to a variety of academic and career goals.
 

CGS Evening Session, School of Arts & Sciences
Folklore and Folklife (221) In addition to these courses offered on campus, Folklore courses are also offered in our Summer Abroad Program. See Penn Summer Abroad for descriptions.
FOLK (221) 290 900, W 5:30-8:40, Winick
Urban Legends and Society
   
   
   
We've all heard about the homicidal maniac with a hook hand, lying in wait at Lover's Lane. We've heard of the babysitter getting threatening calls from a man who is already in the house. We've heard about the hitchhiker who vanishes into thin air, the car haunted by the smell of death, and the killer hiding in the backseat. We've heard about alligators in the sewers, spiders in the hairdo, and mice in the Cola; about stolen kidneys, restroom castrations and babies sold for spare parts; about evil corporations, heartless governments, and even a vast organized network of Satan worshippers looking for blonde virgins on Friday the 13th. This course applies tools of folklore, psychology, sociology, literature and film criticism to our understanding of such urban legends, asking the questions: what do these stories mean? How do they help us make sense of the world? And why do we love them so much? Come prepared to ask challenging questions, to consider unsettling possibilities, and (of course) to tell fun stories!
 

CGS Evening Session, School of Arts & Sciences
Folklore and Folklife (221)
FOLK (221) 406 900, T 5:30-8:40, Griswold
Folklore and the Supernatural
   
   
   Cross-Listed with: RELS 406 900
Beliefs about the supernatural have developed new popularity through mass media, especially through such television shows as "The X-Files" and "Unsolved Mysteries," but what are the traditions behind these beliefs? Does anyone actually believe them? Some beliefs in the supernatural have not diminished appreciably in "modern" cultures, in spite of many predictions that they would do so. This course will examine traditional beliefs about supernatural beings, supernatural realms, and humans who interact with these, as well as the historical development of Western ideas of "the supernatural" itself. Beliefs and ideas about the supernatural are recorded, developed, transformed, and transmitted in folk tales, legends, urban legends, ballads, and personal experience narratives. We will explore these forms, groups who create and maintain them, and their use in everyday life through a selection of folkloric theories and methodologies.
 

CGS Evening Session, Master of Liberal Arts
Folklore and Folklife (221)
FOLK (221) 406 900, T 5:30-8:40, Griswold
Folklore and the Supernatural
   
   
   Cross-Listed with: RELS 406 900

 

CGS Evening Session, School of Arts & Sciences
Folklore and Folklife (221)
FOLK (221) 535 900, M 5:30-8:40, Beresin
Children's Folklore
   Fulfills Distribution Requirement I: Society
   
   Cross-Listed with: EDUC 550 900
This course examines the folklore of children's peer culture. Folk games, stories, rhymes, jokes, ceremonies and play forms will be our focus as we explore childhood cross-culturally. Classic texts by folklorists, anthropologists, sociologists, and developmental psychologists will serve as a framework for the analysis of the student's own fieldwork. Readings include: Step it Down: Games, Plays, Songs, and Stories from the Afro-American Heritage by Jones and Hawes; Children's Folklore: A Sourcebook edited by Sutton-Smith; and One Potato, Two Potato: The Folklore of American Children by Knapp and Knapp. We will see several ethnographic films in order to help us critique the literature.
 

CGS Evening Session, Master of Liberal Arts
Folklore and Folklife (221)
FOLK (221) 535 900, M 5:30-8:40, Beresin
Children's Folklore
   Fulfills Distribution Requirement I: Society
   
   Cross-Listed with: EDUC 550 900

 



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