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Displaying courses 1 through 7 of 7 course listings found.

12 Week Evening Session, Master of Liberal Arts

Folklore and Folklife (221)

FOLK (221) 535 940
Children's Folklore
Fulfills Distribution Requirement I: Society
W, 0530PM-0840PM     Beresin
Cross-Listed with: EDUC 550 940
Williams Hall , Room:316
This course examines childhood cross-culturally and focuses on the expressive cultures of children at play. Students will carry out field observations of children at a playground of their choice and use their fieldwork to critique generalized assumptions about childhood. Topics include games, songs, pranks, rhymes and jokes of childhood and the historical framing of play. This course will be of interest to students of psychology, anthropology, folklore, sociology, linguistics, and social welfare.
12 Week Evening Session, Master of Liberal Arts

Folklore and Folklife (221)

FOLK (221) 580 940
Words in Action: Literature and Activism
M, 0600PM-0910PM     Watterson
Logan Hall , Room:204
How do words transform people, places, and events in ways that bring about social change? What are the motivations, methods, politics and implications of "doing good work?" How does an understanding of doing good work depend on one's position: as non-profit worker, social justice advocate, community activist, business person? In this interdisciplinary seminar we will cover current issues surrounding social initiatives in many forms of literature: from fiction and non-fiction, to exhibits, web-sites, on-line journals, grant-proposals, and ethnographic documentaries. Students will be given an opportunity to do participatory research on local concerns: witnessing, critiquing, and putting words into action.
12 Week Evening Session, Master of Liberal Arts

Folklore and Folklife (221)

FOLK (221) 636 940
Migration and Ethnicity: Research and Archival Resources
M, 0530PM-0840PM     Kruesi
Logan Hall , Room:493
The Philadelphia area offers rich possibilities for conducting research on ethnicity and migration with over 30 major archival and special collections libraries plus hundreds of small archives maintained by community groups. Many of these collections reflect the late 19th-and 20th-century migrations of African Americans, Chinese, Italians, Irish, European Jews, and other Germans and Eastern Europeans to the city. Students will learn how to search archival databases on-line; how to access information in manuscript collections; and how to evaluate diaries, letters, administrative, and other records in historical and cultural contexts. Course topics include the construction and destruction of ethnic boundaries by immigrant groups and by dominant classes; work and migration; immigrants as entrepreneurs; gender differences in the immigration experience; intermarriage; ethnic conflicts (including racial profiling); social mobility; and religious diversity. As immigrants from Africa, Russia, Mexico, Asia, and Central and South America make Philadelphia their home, transnational communities are emerging. The changing landscapes of urban and suburban ethnic communities and traditional festivals, food, dance, and music (and their documentation by professionals and amateurs) are subjects of this course. Students will write a research paper using archival sources and/or oral history research methodology.
CGS Evening Session, CGS

Folklore and Folklife (221)

Note: In addition to these courses offered on campus, Folklore courses are also offered in our Summer Abroad Program. See Penn Summer Abroad for descriptions.
FOLK (221) 201 900
American Folklore
Fulfills General Requirement II: History & Tradition
R, 0530PM-0840PM     Winick
Williams Hall , Room:220
American Folklore encompasses an astonishing array of cultural groups and artistic forms: African-American oral poetry and Franco-American fiddle tunes, Irish-American songs and Italian-American food, Native American jokes and German-American quilts, ancient old-country recipes and the latest and bizarre urban legend. In this course, we will survey some of the groups that we call "American" and some of the expressive traditions that we call "folklore." We will discuss how these traditions originate, how they develop over time, and especially how they become part of or remain separate from American popular culture. Along the way, we will raise important questions about the meanings that folklore holds for "Americans," for smaller cultural groups, and for individuals.
Summer Session 1, School of Arts & Sciences

Folklore and Folklife (221)

FOLK (221) 231 910
American Popular Culture
Fulfills General Requirement III: Arts & Letters
MW, 1030AM-0140PM     Samper
Cross-Listed with: SOCI 229 910
Williams Hall , Room:201
The course will explore the history and practice of popular culture and cultural studies in the United States. We will begin by challenging the concepts of "folk," "mass, "and "popular" as well as "American" and "culture." Through analysis of audience response to performed or viewed events we will explore how and why people actively negotiate and interpret popular materials. This class will attempt to situate popular culture within a larger social, cultural and political framework. We will investigate MTV, talk shows, fashion, club cultures, rap and other music, pro-wrestling, professional sports, Hollywood movies, television and advertising. We will end by looking into the exportation of American popular culture and its reception, interpretation, adaptation and consumption around the world.
Summer Session 2, Master of Liberal Arts

Folklore and Folklife (221)

Note: The following MLA course is a six week taught in the Second Summer Session (July 1-August 9). Non-MLA students may also register for the course. See description under heading Master of Liberal Arts.
FOLK (221) 406 940
Folklore and the Supernatural
TR, 0530PM-0840PM     Griswold
Cross-Listed with: RELS 406 940
Williams Hall , Room:218

Summer Session 2, School of Arts & Sciences

Folklore and Folklife (221)

FOLK (221) 069 920
Folk and Alternative Medicine
TR, 0600PM-0910PM     Ballard
Williams Hall , Room:203
This course will examine folk and popular health belief systems in the United States currently known as Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM). An ethnographic approach to reaching an appreciation and understanding of a variety of healing systems. The many ways in which people explain why and how they become ill will be examined, their methods of choosing what to do about illness, and how these things relate to larger issues of beliefs and values. We will compare these systems with each other, and with the conventional biomedical system, to achieve a better comprehension of the variety of constructions of health, illness and treatment they represent. Guest lectures by practitioners and participants in non-allopathic healing systems will provide insider views of some of the systems under consideration.