Andree Hahmann

DAAD Visiting Professor

753 Williams Hall
Office hours by appointment
Phone:
215-898-8606

Education

Dr. Phil, Philipps-Universitaet Marburg, Germany

Habilitation, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

 

 Andree Hahmann is a DAAD visiting Professor of German and Philosophy at the University of Pennsylvania. He studied Philosophy, Sociology, Politics and Classics at the Universities Cologne, Siegen and Marburg. He received his Dr. Phil. from the Philipps-Universität Marburg in 2007, and his Dr. habil. from the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen in 2015. From 2008 till 2015 he worked as an Assistant Professor at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen. His research, which focuses on history of ancient and modern philosophy, has the following emphases: Aristotle and post-Aristotelian philosophy; Kant and the genesis of German Idealism, Leibniz’ and Wolffian Rationalism and its influence on the philosophical development of the 18th century; the intersections between philosophy and theology; philosophy of mind and metaphysics. He has published on figures such as Aristotle, Epicurus, Wolff, Herder, Schiller, Kant, and Hegel. He is the author of Kritische Metaphysik der Substanz. Kant im Widerspruch zu Leibniz (Berlin, Boston: DeGruyter); Aristoteles’ »Über die Seele«: Ein systematischer Kommentar (Reclam). In his most recent book project, Aristoteles gegen Epikur, forthcoming in 2017 with DeGruyter, he examines the fundamental differences between Aristotelian and Hellenistic philosophy.

With Bernd Ludwig, he has edited the forthcoming volume Über die Fortschritte der kritischen Metaphysik. Beiträge zu System und Architektonik der kantischen Philosophie, in: Kant-Forschungen, Hamburg: Felix Meiner Verlag, which appears in 2016. He is now working on a new book project, Werde Gott gleich, which explores the intersections between theology and ethics in ancient philosophy.

Research Interests

history of ancient and modern philosophy, intersections between philosophy, theology, literature and architecture in the 18th- and  early 20th-century, genesis of German idealism.