Courses for Spring 2018

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 102-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM Continuation of DTCH 101.
    DTCH 502-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT TR 0430PM-0600PM Continuation of DTCH 501.
      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
      GRMN 101-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
        GRMN 102-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
          GRMN 102-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
            GRMN 102-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI MW 0630PM-0830PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
              GRMN 103-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I MTWR 1200PM-0100PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                GRMN 104-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1100AM-1200PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                  GRMN 104-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                    GRMN 104-601 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II MW 0600PM-0815PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                      GRMN 106-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                      TR 1030AM-1200PM
                      This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. An intensive two credit course in which two semesters of elementary German (GRMN 101 & 102) are completed in one. Introduction to the basic elements of spoken and written German, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of communication skills. Readings and discussions focus on cultural differences. Expression and comprehension are then expanded through the study of literature and social themes.
                        GRMN 107-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1200PM-0100PM
                        TR 1200PM-0130PM
                        This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                          GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE BRIE, EVELYNE TBA TBA- The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                            GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0200PM-0330PM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries throuh literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              GRMN 220-001 Business German: A Micro Perspective JAMES, DAVID TR 0900AM-1030AM This course is designed to enhance your speaking, reading and writing skills, in addition to helping you build a strong foundation in business vocabulary. Course objectives include acquiring skills in cross cultural communication, teamwork, business management, and creating a business plan. German grammar will be covered on a need be basis. This course will prepare you to perform and contribute while in a German-speaking business environment.
                                FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                GRMN 232-401 GERMANY FROM UNIFICATION TO REUNIFICATION, 1870-1990 RODGERS, JENNIFER M 0330PM-0630PM The title for Fall 2017 is: The Nazi Revolution: Power and Ideology.
                                  CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                  GRMN 240-401 GLOBAL SUSTAINABILITIES RICHTER, SIMON TR 0300PM-0430PM This research-oriented seminar focuses on the ways in which "sustainability" and "sustainable development" are linguistically and culturally translated into the world's languages. We may take the terms for granted, but they have only really been on the global stage since they were widely introduced in the 1987 United Nations report, Our Common Future. Seminar participants will first become acquainted with the cultural and conceptual history of the terms and the UN framework within which sustainability efforts directly or indirectly operate. Having established the significance of cultural and linguistic difference in conceiving and implementing sustainability, participants will collaboratively develop a research methodology in order to begin collecting and analyzing data. We will draw heavily on Penn's diverse language communities and international units. Seminar members will work together and individually to build an increasingly comprehensive website that provides information about the world's languages of sustainability.
                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                    GRMN 242-401 FANTASTIC/UNCANNY IN LIT: GHOSTS,SPIRITS&MACHINES WEISSBERG, LILIANE TR 1030AM-1200PM Do we still believe in spirits and ghosts? Do they have any place in an age of science of technology? Can they perhaps help us to define what a human being is and what it can do? We will venture on a journey through literary texts from the late eighteenth century to the present to explore the uncanny and fantastic in literature and Our discussions will be based on a reading of Sigmund Freud's essay on the uncanny, and extraordinary Romantic narratives by Ludwig Tieck, E.T.A. Hoffmann, Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Prosper Merim¿e, Villiers de Isle-Adam, and others.
                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                      GRMN 247-401 MARX HAHMANN, ANDREE TR 0300PM-0430PM "A spectre is haunting Europe--the spectre of Communism": This, the famous opening line of The Communist Manifesto, will guide this course's exploration of the history, legacy, and potential future of Karl Marx's most important texts and ideas, even long after Communism has been pronounced dead. Contextualizing Marx within a tradition of radical thought regarding politics, religion, and sexuality, we will focus on the philosophical, political, and cultural origins and implications of his ideas. Our work will center on the question of how his writings seek to counter or exploit various tendencies of the time; how they align with the work of Nietzsche, Freud, and other radical thinkers to follow; and how they might continue to haunt us today. We will begin by discussing key works by Marx himself, examining ways in which he is both influenced by and appeals to many of the same fantasies, desires, and anxieties encoded in the literature, arts and intellectual currents of the time. In examining his legacy, we will focus on elaborations or challenges to his ideas, particularly within cultural criticism, postwar protest movements, and the cultural politics of the Cold War. In conclusion, we will turn to the question of Marxism or Post-Marxism today, asking what promise Marx's ideas might still hold in a world vastly different from his own.
                                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                        GRMN 249-401 MODERNISM AND THE THEORY OF FASHION RABATE, JEAN-MICHEL TR 0900AM-1030AM This course explores an aspect of literary modernism intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Topic title for Spring 2018: Modernism and the Theory of Fashion. In this class we will study international modernism from 1860 to 1940 by focusing on the emergence of a concept of the "new" that was also understood as a "new fashion." What was the "fashion of the new," how was it linked with "fashion" itself? The rise of modernism was accompanied by a series of self-conscious discourses in fashion, the first of which were elaborated by Beaudelaire & Malla rme. We will follow the social uses of the "new" in the context of the fashion industry so as to map a cultural history of "fashion" as it was developed by Walter Benjamin and Georg Simmel. We will read through Beaudelaire and Mallarme's prose and poetry, then engage with Aragon's Surrealist novel Paris Peasant, after which we will survey selected sections of Benjamin's Arcades Project. All the while, the Fashion Theory: A Reader will serve as our theoretical guide.
                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                          GRMN 257-401 FASCIST CINEMAS MACLEOD, CATRIONA MW 1100AM-1200PM Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
                                            Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                            GRMN 301-001 HANDSCHRIFT-HYPERTEXT UCA, DIDEM TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will provide an introduction to German-language literary studies through exemplary readings of short forms: fables, fairy tales, aphorisms, stories, novellas, feuilletons, poems, songs, radio plays, film clips, web projects and others. Paying particular attention to how emergent technology influences genre, we will trace an evolution from Minnesang to rock songs, from early print culture to the internet age and from Handschrift to hypertext. Students will have ample opportunity to improve their spoken and written German through class discussion and a series of internet-based assignments. Readings and discussions in German.
                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                              GRMN 356-001 DARK DEEDS: CRIME AND DETECTION NOVELS FREI, CHRISTINA MW 0200PM-0330PM The detective story and the crime drama are time-honored genres of literature and popular culture. We are drawn to morbid scenes of violence and crime, and satisfied by the apprehension of criminals and their punishment. At the same time, the process of detection, of deciphering clues, is much like the process of reading and interpretion. In this course we will read a variety of detective and crime stories, some by famous authors (e.g., Droste-Huelshoff, Fontane, Handke), others by contemporary authors that address interesting aspects of German culture (e.g., Turkish-Germans, gay and lesbian subcultures, DDR and Wende). We will also look at episodes from popular West, East, and post-reunification German TV crime shows (e.g., Tatort).
                                                GRMN 403-301 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM RICHTER, SIMON TBA TBA-
                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                  GRMN 501-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                    GRMN 502-401 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                      GRMN 502-402 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                        GRMN 502-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI MW 0630PM-0830PM
                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                          GRMN 503-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                            GRMN 504-401 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1100AM-1200PM
                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                              GRMN 504-402 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER MTWR 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                GRMN 504-601 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II MW 0600PM-0815PM
                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                  GRMN 505-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                  TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA MW 0200PM-0330PM
                                                                      CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                      GRMN 511-301 STYLISTICS Textual analysis based on communication theory. Texts selected from literature and other disciplines. Emphasis placed on the development of the student's own compositional and stylistic skills.
                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                        GRMN 514-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL MWF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                        TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                          GRMN 516-401 TEACHING METHODS FREI, CHRISTINA T 0200PM-0400PM This course examines major foreign language methodologies, introduces resources available to foreign language teachers, and addresses current issues and concerns of foreign language teaching and learning, such as second language acquisition theory and application of technology.
                                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                            GRMN 544-401 PUBLIC ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES WIGGIN, BETHANY W 0200PM-0500PM This broadly interdisciplinary course is designed for Graduate and Undergraduate Fellows in the Penn Program in Environmental Humanities (PPEH) who hail from departments across Arts and Sciences as well as other schools at the university. The course is also open to others with permission of the instructors. Work in environmental humanities by necessity spans academic disciplines. By design, it can also address and engage publics beyond traditional academic settings. This seminar, with limited enrollment, explores best practices in public environmental humanities. Students receive close mentoring to develop and execute cross-disciplinary, public engagement projects on the environment. In spring 2018, participants have the opportunity to participate in PPEH's public engagement projects on urban waters and environmental data. These ongoing projects document the variety of uses that Philadelphians make of federal climateand environmental data, in and beyond city government; they also shine light onclimate and environmental challenges our city faces and the kinds of data we need to address them. Working with five community partners across Philadelphia, including the City's Office of Sustainability, students in this course will develop data use stories and surface the specific environmental questions neighborhoods have and the kinds of data they find useful. The course hosts guest speakers and research partners from related public engagement projects across the planet; community, neighborhood, open data, and open science advocates; and project partners in government in the City of Philadelphia and Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Course assignments include: * 2 short-form essays (course blog posts); * a 12-hour research stay (conducted over multiple visits) with a community course partner to canvas data uses and desires; * authorship of 3 multi-media data stories; * co-organization and participation in a city-wide data storytelling event on May 2, 2018.
                                                                              ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                              GRMN 557-301 READING THE 20TH CENTURY
                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                GRMN 580-401 TOPICS IN AESTHETICS: WALTER BENJAMIN WEISSBERG, LILIANE T 0300PM-0500PM Topic title for Spring 2018: Walter Benjamin. Walter Benjamin (1892-1940) is a philosopher whose writings on art, literature, and politics have had tremendous influence on many disciplines in the Humanities and Social Studies. He has been variously described as one of the leading German-Jewish thinkers, and a secular Marxist theorist. With the publication of a four-volume collection of this works in English, many more of his writings have been made accessible to a wider public. Our seminar will undertake a survey of his work that begins with his studies on language and allegory, and continues with his autobiographical work, his writings on art and literature, and on the imaginary urban spaces of the nineteenth-century.
                                                                                  ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                  GRMN 582-401 REVOLUTIONS & DICTATORS KENNEDY, ELLEN W 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary.
                                                                                    ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                    GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP T 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                      SCND 102-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM Continuation of SCND 101. This is a two-semester course designed to teach beginning skills in Swedish reading comprehension, vocabulary acquisition, listening comprehension, writing, and conversation. Swedish social development will also be examined in relation to its cultural milieu. A trip to Gloria Dei Old Swedes Church in Philadelphia for their Luciafest will be included on a December weekend, a visit to a Swedish film during the Philadelphia Film festival will take place in late April, and other events as announced.
                                                                                        SCND 502-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA MWF 1100AM-1200PM Continuation of SCND 501.
                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                          YDSH 102-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM In this course, you can continue to develop basic reading, writing and speaking skills. Discover treasures of Yiddish culture: songs, literature, folklore, and films.
                                                                                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                            YDSH 502-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                                              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE