Courses for Fall 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 101-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT WILLIAMS HALL 318 TR 0430PM-0600PM A first semester language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch.
    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
    DTCH 501-401 ELEMENTARY DUTCH I NABORN, ROBERT WILLIAMS HALL 318 TR 0430PM-0600PM A first semester Dutch language course covering the core Dutch grammar and vocabulary with the goal of providing the corner stone for developing overall linguistic proficiency in Dutch.
      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
      GRMN 011-301 BAD TASTE MACLEOD, CATRIONA WILLIAMS HALL 201
      WILLIAMS HALL 202
      T 1030AM-1200PM
      R 1030AM-1200PM
      "Beauty is not a quality inherent to things: it only exists in the mind of the beholder." (David Hume) " Most of us can recognize bad taste as soon as we see it: Harlequin romances, Elvis on black velvet, lawn ornaments. But bad taste also has a history, and kitsch has been identified as a peculiarly modern invention related to capitalism and consumerism. Beginning with a discussion of taste in the eighteenth century, we will investigate under what conditions good taste can go bad, for example when it is the object of mass reproduction, and, on the other hand, why bad taste in recent times has increasingly been viewed in positive terms. Categories such as the cute, the sentimental, the popular, the miniature, kitsch, and camp will be explored. We will also ask what forms of ideological work have been done by this brand of aesthetics, for example in the connection between politics and kitsch, femininity and the low-brow, or camp and queer identity. Writers and film-makers to be discussed include: Hume, Kant, Goethe, Flaubert, Bourdieu, Sacher-Masoch, Thomas Mann, Nabokov, Benjamin, Greenberg, Sontag, John Waters. “Beauty is not a quality inherent in things: it only exists in the mind of the beholder” (David Hume). Most of us can recognize bad taste as soon as we see it: Harlequin romances, Elvis on black velvet, lawn ornaments. But bad taste also has a history, and kitsch has been identified as a peculiarly modern invention related to capitalism and consumerism. Beginning with a discussion of taste in the eighteenth century, we will investigate under what conditions good taste can go bad, for example when it is the object of mass reproduction, and, on the other hand, why bad taste in recent times has increasingly been viewed in positive terms. Categories such as the cute, the sentimental, the popular, the vulgar, the miniature, kitsch, and camp will be explored. We will also ask what forms of ideological work have been done by this brand of aesthetics, for example in the connection between politics and kitsch, femininity and the “low-brow,” or camp and queer identity. Writers and film-makers to be discussed include: Hume, Kant, Goethe, Flaubert, Bourdieu, Sacher-Masoch, Thomas Mann, Nabokov, Benjamin, Greenberg, Sontag, John Waters.
        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
        GRMN 023-401 IN PRAISE OF THE SMALL WEISSBERG, LILIANE CANCELED We can memorize aphorisms and jokes, carry miniature portraits with us, and feel playful in handling small objects. This seminar will ask us to pay attention to smaller texts, art works, and objects that may easily be overlooked. In addition to reading brief texts and looking at images and objects, we will also read texts on the history and theory of short genres and the small. Not offered in Fall 2017!
          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
          GRMN 027-301 Euro Zone Crisis - The EU in a Currency War for Survival? SHIELDS, SUSANNE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 392 TR 1030AM-1200PM "Let me put it simply...there may be a contradiction between the interests of the financial world and the interests of the political world...We cannot keep constantly explaining to our voters and our citizens why the taxpayer should bear the cost of certain risks and not those people who have earned a lot of money from taking those risks." Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, at the G20 Summit, November 2010. In January 1999, a single monetary system united Germany, a core nation, with 10 other European states. Amidst the optimism of the euro's first days, most observers forecast that Europe would progress toward an ever closer union. Indeed, in the ensuing decade, the European Union became the world's largest trading area, the euro area expanded to include 17 member states, and the Lisbon Treaty enhanced the efficiency and democratic legitimacy of the Union. In 2009, Greece's debt crisis exposed deep rifts within the European Union and developed into a euro zone crisis - arguably the most difficult test Europe has faced in the past 60 years. After two years of a more benign EURO debt situation, the risk of recession, EU sanctions agains Russia, and a possible collision of a newly-elected Greek government with its creditors, the euro crisis returned with a vengeance in 2015. In addition, the pressure mounts for European leaders to find a solution to the refugee crisis which reached a peak in the fall of 2015. In 2016 the Brexit delivered the latest blow to the European Union, and the future of the European project without the UK looks bleak. The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is still fragile, and economic and political developments in 2017 could determine the future of the euro. Does the EU have what it takes to emerge from these crises? Will the European nations find a collective constructive solution that will lead to a fiscal union that implies further integration? “Let me put it simply… there may be a contradiction between the interests of the financial world and the interests of the political world…. We cannot keep constantly explaining to our voters and our citizens why the taxpayer should bear the cost of certain risks and not those people who have earned a lot of money from taking those risks.” Angela Merkel, Chancellor of Germany, at the G20 Summit, November 2010 In January 1999, a single monetary system united Germany, a core nation, with 10 other European states. Amidst the optimism of the euro’s first days, most observers forecast that Europe would progress toward an ever closer union. Indeed, in the ensuing decade, the European Union became the world's largest trading area, the euro area expanded to include 17 member states, and the Lisbon Treaty enhanced the efficiency and democratic legitimacy of the Union. In 2009, Greece’s debt crisis exposed deep rifts within the European Union and developed into a euro zone crisis – arguably the most difficult test Europe has faced in the past 60 years. After two years of a more benign EURO debt situation, the risk of recession, EU sanctions against Russia, and a possible collision of a newly-elected Greek government with its creditors, the euro crisis returned with a vengeance in 2015. In addition, the pressure mounts for European leaders to find a solution to the refugee crisis which reached a peak in the fall of 2015. In 2016 the Brexit delivered the latest blow to the European Union, and the future of the European project without the UK looks bleak. The Economic and Monetary Union (EMU) is still fragile, and economic and political developments in 2017 could determine the future of the euro. Does the EU have what it takes to emerge from these crises? Will the European nations find a collective constructive solution that will lead to a fiscal union that implies further integration? At a time when Germany is increasingly expected to provide leadership to prevent the collapse of the EU, the goal of this seminar is to explore how and why the euro zone has arrived at the situation in which it now finds itself, and to consider how major European euro and non-euro members see the consequences of the crisis for their own role in the EU and what role the United States has to play in the future of the euro zone. Two major issues, the complexity of decision-making within the EU and the challenges to forming a European identity, further compound the issue. Studying different perspectives, the goal is to stimulate thinking about if and how different national identities of European member states and varying political, economic, and cultural climates still pose major obstacles to potential solutions to the crisis.
            ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
            GRMN 031-401 HIPSTER PHILOSOPHY FROM MARX TO ZIZEK FLEISHMAN, IAN CANCELED From Wes Anderson to Williamsburg, hipster culture is everywhere. And yet the very notion of the hipster remains notoriously difficult to define--whether we perceive this cultural phenomenon as the waste product of the postmodern, as a new form of consumerism, as a peculiar attitude toward irony and authenticity, as scenester posturing or as just plain cool. This course addresses such tensions through an examination of the intellectual history of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Each week pairs philosophical and theoretical readings with an artifact of hipster culture: reading Instagram beside Walter Benjamin, ironic facial hair with Friedrich Nietzsche, Facebook through the lens of Georg Lukacs and indie music alongside Theodor Adorno. No previous knowledge of skinny jeans required. Canceled! Not offered in Fall 2017.
              ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
              GRMN 101-001 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16 MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                GRMN 101-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 741 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                  GRMN 101-003 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 304
                  WILLIAMS HALL 304
                  MWF 0100PM-0200PM
                  TR 0130PM-0230PM
                  Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                    GRMN 101-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I MCKINLEY, LUSI FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16 MW 0600PM-0800PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                      GRMN 102-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 216 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                        GRMN 103-001 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 318 MTWR 1100AM-1200PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                          GRMN 103-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I WILLIAMS HALL 4 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                            LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                            GRMN 103-601 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 1 MW 0600PM-0800PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                              GRMN 104-001 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 216 MTWR 1100AM-1200PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                GRMN 104-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 303 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                  GRMN 106-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 317
                                  WILLIAMS HALL 317
                                  TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                  MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                  This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. An intensive two credit course in which two semesters of elementary German (GRMN 101 & 102) are completed in one. Introduction to the basic elements of spoken and written German, with emphasis placed on the acquisition of communication skills. Readings and discussions focus on cultural differences. Expression and comprehension are then expanded through the study of literature and social themes.
                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                    GRMN 107-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL COLLEGE HALL 318
                                    COLLEGE HALL 318
                                    MWF 1200PM-0100PM
                                    TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                    This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                      GRMN 145-401 THE VIKINGS KUSKOWSKI, ADA COLLEGE HALL 318 TR 0130PM-0300PM The Vikings were the terror of Europe from the late eight to the eleventh century. Norwegians, Danes and Swedes left their homeland of trade, raid and pillage, leaving survivors praying "Oh Lord, deliver us from the fury of the Norsemen!" While commonly associated with violent barbarism, the Norse were also farmers, craftsmen, and merchants.
                                        CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                        GRMN 150-401 WATER WORLDS RICHTER, SIMON FISHER-BENNETT HALL 231 MWF 1000AM-1100AM As a result of climate change, the world that will take shape in the course of this century will be decidedly more inundated with water than we're accustomed to. The polar ice caps are melting, glaciers are retreating, ocean levels are rising, polar bear habitat is disappearing, countries are jockeying for control over a new Arctic passage, while low-lying cities and small island nations are confronting the possibility of their own demise. Catastrophic flooding events are increasing in frequency, as are extreme droughts. Hurricane-related storm surges,tsunamis, and raging rivers have devastated regions on a local and global scale. In this seminar we will turn to the narratives and images that the human imagination has produced in response to the experience of overwhelming watery invasion, from Noah to New Orleans. Objects of analysis will include mythology, ancient and early modern diluvialism, literature, art, film, and commemorative practice. The basic question we'll be asking is: What can we learn from the humanities that will be helpful for confronting the problems and challenges caused by climate change and sea level rise?
                                          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                          GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE BRIE, EVELYNE TBA TBA- The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                                            CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                            GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS FREI, CHRISTINA VAN PELT LIBRARY 113 MWF 1000AM-1100AM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries throuh literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                              GRMN 219-001 GERMAN BUSINESS WORLD: A Macro Perspective JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 1 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course offers you insights into the dynamics of Business German, while taking a macro approach. Examples of various course topics include: economic geography and its diversity, the changing role of the Eruopean Union, and the economic importance of national transportation and tourism. In addition, the course emphasizes the development of students' discourse competencies, Business German vocabulary and grammar. Course assignments include oral presentations on current events, class discussions, role-play, and collaborative group work. Class time will be utilized to practice speaking, answering questions, reviewing exercises and holding group discussions on various topics. Class participation is a key component of this course.
                                                FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                GRMN 232-403 THE NAZI REVOLUTION: POWER AND IDEOLOGY STEINBERG, JONATHAN
                                                KANT, MARION
                                                MCNEIL CENTER FOR EARLY AMERI 105 T 0130PM-0430PM The title for Fall 2017 is: The Nazi Revolution: Power and Ideology. The title for Fall 2017 is: The Nazi Revolution: Power and Ideology.
                                                  ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                  GRMN 237-401 BERLIN: HIST POL CULTURE WEISSBERG, LILIANE MCNEIL BUILDING 103 TR 1030AM-1200PM What do you know about Berlin's history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and Koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin's rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, and its position as a center of the German and Jewish Enlightenment. It will follow Berlin's transformation into an industrial city in the nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin's position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin's urban structure, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker's housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we will read literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin, and focus on Berlin's Jewish history. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, urban studies, and German-Jewish studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduate students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin. What do you know about Berlin’s history, architecture, culture, and political life? The present course will offer a survey of the history of Prussia, beginning with the seventeenth century, and the unification of the small towns of Berlin and Koelln to establish a new capital for this country. It will tell the story of Berlin’s rising political prominence in the eighteenth century, and its position as a center of the German and Jewish Enlightenment. It will follow Berlin's transformation into an industrial city in the late nineteenth century, its rise to metropolis in the early twentieth century, its history during the Third Reich, and the post-war cold war period. The course will conclude its historical survey with a consideration of Berlin’s position as a capital in reunified Germany. The historical survey will be supplemented by a study of Berlin’s urban structure, its significant architecture from the eighteenth century (i.e. Schinkel) to the nineteenth (new worker’s housing, garden suburbs) and twentieth centuries (Bauhaus, Speer designs, postwar rebuilding, GDR housing projects, post-unification building boom). In addition, we will read literary texts about the city, and consider the visual art and music created in and about Berlin, and focus on Berlin's Jewish history. The course will be interdisciplinary with the fields of German Studies, history, history of art, urban studies, and German-Jewish studies. It is also designed as a preparation for undergraduate students who are considering spending a junior semester with the Penn Abroad Program in Berlin.
                                                    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                    GRMN 263-401 JEWISH AMERICAN LIT HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN CANCELED What makes Jewish American literature Jewish? What makes it American? This course will address these questions about ethnic literature through fiction, poetry, drama, and other writings by Jews in America, from their arrival in 1654 to the present. We will discuss how Jewish identity and ethnicity shape literature and will consider how form and language develop as Jewish writers "immigrate" from Yiddish, Hebrew, and other languages to American English. Our readings, from Jewish American Literature: A Norton Anthology, will include a variety of stellar authors, both famous and less-known, including Isaac Mayer Wise, Emma Lazarus, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Celia Dropkin, Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, and Allegra Goodman. Students will come away from this course having explored the ways that Jewish culture intertwines with American culture in literature.
                                                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                      GRMN 263-402 JEWISH AMERICAN LIT HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3C2
                                                      DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 2C2
                                                      T 0300PM-0430PM
                                                      R 0300PM-0430PM
                                                      What makes Jewish American literature Jewish? What makes it American? This course will address these questions about ethnic literature through fiction, poetry, drama, and other writings by Jews in America, from their arrival in 1654 to the present. We will discuss how Jewish identity and ethnicity shape literature and will consider how form and language develop as Jewish writers "immigrate" from Yiddish, Hebrew, and other languages to American English. Our readings, from Jewish American Literature: A Norton Anthology, will include a variety of stellar authors, both famous and less-known, including Isaac Mayer Wise, Emma Lazarus, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Celia Dropkin, Abraham Cahan, Anzia Yezierska, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Cynthia Ozick, and Allegra Goodman. Students will come away from this course having explored the ways that Jewish culture intertwines with American culture in literature.
                                                        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                        GRMN 302-001 PLACES OF MEMORY RICHTER, SIMON WILLIAMS HALL 303 MWF 0300PM-0400PM What is culture? What is German? Where are the borders between German, Austrian and Swiss culture? What is part of the "cultural canon"? Who decides and what role does memory play? Relying on the theory of collective memory (Halbwachs) and the concept of "places of memory" (Erinnerungsorte; Nora, Francois/Schulze) and with reference to examplary scholarly and literary texts, debates, songs, films, documents, and paintings from high and pop culture, this course will weave a mosaic of that which (also) constitutes German or German-language culture.
                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                          GRMN 363-401 MODERN PHIL. FIGURES: KANT'S CRITICAL PROJECT HAHMANN, ANDREE MCNEIL BUILDING 309 TR 0300PM-0430PM This seminar is dedicated to Kant's critical philosophy. In particular, the Critique of pure Reason, which is the first of three Critiques, ranks amongst the most important texts of modern philosophy. Even in contemporary debates, Kantian claims still play a crucial role and basic knowledge of Kant's critical philosophy is often assumed. In this seminar we will deal with central passages from different works which, taken together, give a good picture of Kant's critical revision of classical metaphysics. We shall discuss important conceptions and ideas of Kant's mature philosophy, such as the nature of transcendental aesthetics and the resulting distinction between a thing-in-itself and appearance, the meaning and application of the categories, the justification and determination of human freedom, and the role of the moral law for Kant's so-called practical metaphysics. This seminar is dedicated to Kant’s critical philosophy. In particular, the Critique of pure Reason, which is the first of three Critiques, ranks amongst the most important texts of modern philosophy. Even in contemporary debates, Kantian claims still play a crucial role and basic knowledge of Kant’s critical philosophy is often assumed. In this seminar we will deal with central passages from different works which, taken together, give a good picture of Kant’s critical revision of classical metaphysics. We shall discuss important conceptions and ideas of Kant’s mature philosophy, such as the nature of transcendental aesthetics and the resulting distinction between a thing-in-itself and appearance, the meaning and application of the categories, the justification and determination of human freedom, and the role of the moral law for Kant’s so-called practical metaphysics.
                                                            ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                            GRMN 381-301 DEUTSCHLAND SCHAFFT SICH AB...ODER ERFINDET SICH NEU? HAHMANN, ANDREE FISHER-BENNETT HALL 138 TR 1200PM-0130PM Fall 2017 description: Deutschland steht aktuell vor einer Vielzahl von Herausforderungen, die teils wesentlich gesellschaftliche Bereiche betreffen. Man muss davon ausgehen, dass die heute getroffenen Entscheidungen die deutsche, aber auch europaeische Zukunft fuer eine nicht absehbare Zeit massgeblich beeinflussen werden. Viele der verhandelten Fragen und Probleme sind zum Teil eng miteinander verwoben und erfordern zur Bewaeltigung gesamtpolitisch uebergreifende Loesungsstrategien. Diese verlangen gegebenenfalls einen tiefgreifenden gesellschaftlichen, politischen und oekonomischen Wandel der bestehenden Verhaeltnisse, da zum Teil grundlegende Strukturen und Ueberzeugungen weiter Teile der Bevoelkerung betroffen sind. Aus diesem Grund werden Auffassungen, die lange Zeit als gesicherter Bestand des gesellschaftlichen Diskurses galten, infrage gestellt. Es ist daher nicht verwunderlich, dass die drohenden Veraenderungen reaktionaere Kraefte provozieren, die um die Erhaltung bestehender Verhaeltnisse besorgt sind. Denn es ist zu vermuten, dass der anstehende Wandel nicht alle betroffenen Gruppen besser stellen wird und vielleicht groessere Opfer erfordert, als bislang eingestanden wurde. Dieses Seminar wird einige der dringenden Fragestellungen thematisieren und somit versuchen, ein aktuelles Bild der bestehenden deutschen Verhaeltnisse zu vermitteln. Das eroeffnet den Blick auf eine moegliche Zukunft Deutschlands, aber auch Europas.
                                                              GRMN 401-001 TRANS(L)ITS FISHER-BENNETT HALL 25 TR 0130PM-0300PM The course, required for all majors in the fall of their senior year, considers movements between languages, including those of the students themselves. Research underscores the importance of providing students and adult language learners with the tools to reflect on their own language learning. This required course provides an important space for German-learners at Penn to draw on one another's experiences in the program, to build a sense of community, and to complete a final project which, in the case of majors, serves to establish their senior thesis. Drawing on Goethe's musings on "world literature," the course focuses on authors who have arrived at their German words via global, worldly itineraries. Authors who adopt German as their literary language-sometimes called Chamisso authors in honor of the nineteenth-century writer Adalbert von Chamisso, by birth a French speaker-provide a special focus of this course. The course encourages students to become Chamisso authors themselves via a series of critical and creative writing exercises. The course, required for all majors in the fall of their senior year, considers movements between languages, including those of the students themselves. Research underscores the importance of providing students and adult language learners with the tools to reflect on their own language learning. This required course provides an important space for German-learners at Penn to draw on one another's experiences in the program, to build a sense of community, and to complete a final project which, in the case of majors, serves to establish their senior thesis. Drawing on Goethe's musings on "world literature," the course focuses on authors who have arrived at their German words via global, worldly itineraries. Authors who adopt German as their literary language-sometimes called Chamisso authors in honor of the nineteenth-century writer Adelbert von Chamisso, by birth a French speaker-provide a special focus of this course. The course encourages students to become Chamisso authors themselves via a series of critical and creative writing exercises.
                                                                CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                GRMN 501-001 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  GRMN 501-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I
                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    GRMN 501-003 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                      GRMN 501-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I MCKINLEY, LUSI FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16 MW 0600PM-0800PM
                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                        GRMN 502-001 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II
                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                          GRMN 502-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II
                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                            GRMN 503-001 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                              GRMN 503-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I
                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                GRMN 503-601 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 1 MW 0600PM-0800PM
                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                  GRMN 504-001 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
                                                                                    SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                    GRMN 504-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II
                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                      GRMN 505-401 ACCELERATED ELEM GERMAN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 317
                                                                                      WILLIAMS HALL 317
                                                                                      TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                      MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                        GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS FREI, CHRISTINA VAN PELT LIBRARY 113 MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                          GRMN 514-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL COLLEGE HALL 318
                                                                                          COLLEGE HALL 318
                                                                                          MWF 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                                          TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                            GRMN 527-401 PHILOSOPHY OF PSYCHOLOGY: MIND IN NATURE HATFIELD, GARY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 R 0300PM-0600PM The seminar will consider selected episodes in the interaction between philosophy and psychology. It starts with an intensive study of Descartes' machine psychology (in the Treatise on Man), which should complicate our picture of the history of such interactions. We then proceed, partly in response to student interest, to interactions involving Kant and nineteenth-century Kantians, Rylean "behaviorism", and recent work on the embodied mind (Wheeler, others).
                                                                                              ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                              GRMN 534-401 HISTORY LIT THEORY KAZANJIAN, DAVID VAN PELT LIBRARY 302 T 0600PM-0900PM Over the last three decades, the fields of literary and cultural studies have been reconfigured by a variety of theoretical and methodological developments. Bracing-and-often confrontational-dialogues between theoretical and political positions as varied as Deconstruction. New Historicism, Cultural Materialism, Feminism, Queer Theory, Minority Discourse Theory, Colonial and Post-colonial Studies and Cultural Studies have, in particular, altered disciplinary agendas and intellectual priorities for students embarking on the /professional / study of literature. In this course, we will study key texts, statements and debates that define these issues, and will work towards a broad knowledge of the complex rewriting of the project of literary studies in process today. The readiing list will keep in mind the Examination List in Comparative Literature-we will not work towards complete coverage but will ask how crucial contemporary theorists engage with the longer history and institutional practices of literary criticism. There will be no examinations. Students will make one class presentation, which will then be reworked into a paper (1200-1500 words) to be submitted one week after the presentation. A second paper will be an annotated bibliography on a theoretical issue or issues that a student wishes to explore further. The bibliography will be developed in consultation with the instructor; it will typically include three or four books and six to eight articles or their equivalent. The annotated bibliography will be prefaced by a five or six page introduction; the whole will add up to between 5000 and 6000 words of prose. Students will prepare "position notes" each week, which will either be posted on a weblog or circulated in class.
                                                                                                ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                GRMN 543-401 ENVIRONMENTAL HUMANITIES WIGGIN, BETHANY WILLIAMS HALL 215 W 0200PM-0500PM Environmental Humanities: Theory, Methods, Practice is a seminar-style course designed to introduce students to the trans- and interdisciplinary field of environmental humanities. Weekly readings and discussions will be complemented by guest speakers from a range of disciplines including ecology, atmospheric science, computing, history of science, medicine, anthropology, literature, and the visual arts. Participants will develop their own research questions and a final project, with special consideration given to building the multi-disciplinary collaborative teams research in the environmental humanities often requires.
                                                                                                  ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                  GRMN 548-401 19TH C PHIL: SCHOPENHAUER & NIETZSCHE HORSTMANN, ROLF CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 TR 1200PM-0130PM After an orientation to Kant's philosophy, we will examine Hegel, Feuerbach, Marx, and Nietzsche.
                                                                                                    ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                    GRMN 556-301 WHAT IS ENLIGHTENMENT? WEISSBERG, LILIANE VAN PELT LIBRARY 627 T 0300PM-0500PM The question "What is the Enlightenment?" was posed for an essay competition in a journal, the Berlin Monatsschrift in 1784. At that point, French and English philosophers had already considered new ways of thinking, inventing the modern individual and the modern citizen (in contrast to a state's subject). German responses to this question were written by an established philosopher (Immanuel Kant), a Jewish resident of Berlin (Moses Mendelssohn), as well as concerned readers of recent philosophical treastises. In our course, we will consider this question by exploring this early discussion and the formation of Enlightenment thought in Europe and specifically Germany, including the German-Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), but also trace the historical transformation of this discussion, including Theodor W. Adorno's and Max Horkheimer's Dialectics of Enlightenment (1944/1947) and more recent criticism. The question "What is the Enlightenment?" was posed for an essay competition in a journal, the Berlin Monatsschrift, in 1784. At that point, French and English philosophers had already considered new ways of thinking, inventing the modern individual and the modern citizen (in contrast to a state's subject). German responses to this question were written by an established philosopher (Immanuel Kant), a Jewish resident of Berlin (Moses Mendelssohn), as well as concerned readers of recent philosophical treastises. In our course, we will consider this question by exploring this early discussion and the formation of Enlightenment thought in Europe and specifically Germany, including the German-Jewish Enlightenment (Haskalah), but also trace the historical transformation of this discussion, including Theodor W. Adorno's and Max Horkheimer's Dialectics of Enlightenment (1944/1947) and more recent criticism.
                                                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                      GRMN 560-401 KANT'S PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION CHIGNELL, ANDREW CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 T 0300PM-0600PM Topics change annually. Topic for Fall 2017 is: A seminar on Kant's religious thought in the context of his metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of history. Topics include: theistic arguments; non-classical conceptions of God; radical evil; grace, forgiveness, and moral revolution; belief, faith, and hope: rational approaches to scripture and miracles; the threat of counterfeit service and priescraft; religious community versus ethical community; the prospects for moral progress. Primary readings come from the pre-critical period, the Critiques, Religion with the Limits of Reason Alone, and various lectures and secondary sources. Some previous formal study of modern philosophy (17th-19th century) or Kant is recommended as preparation. Undergraduates require the permission of the instructor.
                                                                                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                        GRMN 573-402 TPS IN CRITICISM & THEOR: OBJECT THEORY MACLEOD, CATRIONA WILLIAMS HALL 28 T 0100PM-0300PM Topic for Fall 2017: "Object Theory". This seminar will investigate the rise of and ongoing scholarly concern with "objects" and "things," which has emerged from fields such as anthropology and art history as a category of renewed interest for literary scholars, too. We will investigate key contributions to theories of the object by thinkers such as: Mauss, Barthes, Heidegger, Latour, Benjamin, Bill Brown, Jane Bennett, among others. Literary readings will accompany these theoretical texts. Topics change annually. Topic for Fall 2017: "Object Theory". This seminar will investigate the rise of and ongoing scholarly concern with “objects” and “things,” which has emerged from fields such as anthropology and art history as a category of renewed interest for literary scholars, too. We will investigate key contributions to theories of the object by thinkers such as: Mauss, Barthes, Heidegger, Latour, Benjamin, Bill Brown, Jane Bennett, among others. Literary readings will accompany these theoretical texts.
                                                                                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                          GRMN 582-401 TOPICS POLITICAL SCIENCE: REVOLUTIONS & DICTATORS KENNEDY, ELLEN PERRY WORLD HOUSE 108 W 0200PM-0500PM Topics vary.
                                                                                                            ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                            GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP WILLIAMS HALL 440 T 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                              SCND 101-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA WILLIAMS HALL 438 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Basic language course stressing grammatical structures and vocabulary, pronunciation, simple conversation and reading of elementary texts. Credit for this course will only be given upon successful completion of SCND 102.
                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                SCND 501-401 ELEMENTARY SWEDISH I AAHREN, ANNIKA WILLIAMS HALL 438 MWF 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                  YDSH 101-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER MCNEIL BUILDING 409 TR 1200PM-0130PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                    YDSH 103-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN CANCELED The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                                                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                      YDSH 108-401 RDGS IN MOD YIDDISH LIT HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3N6 T 0430PM-0730PM This course will survey modern Yiddish literature through readings of Yiddish prose and poetry from the end of the 19th century through the late 20th century. The class will be conducted in both Yiddish and English. Reading knowledge of Yiddish is required, although some texts will be available in English translation. Authors include I.L. Peretz, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Moyshe-Leyb Halpern, and Kadya Molodowsky.
                                                                                                                        YDSH 501-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH I BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER MCNEIL BUILDING 409 TR 1200PM-0130PM The goal of this course is to help beginning students develop skills in Yiddish conversation, reading and writing. Yiddish is the medium of a millennium of Jewish life. We will frequently have reason to refer to the history and culture of Ashkenazie Jewry in studying the language.
                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                          YDSH 503-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH I HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN CANCELED The course will continue the first year's survey of Yiddish grammar with an additional emphasis on reading Yiddish texts. The course will also develop conversational skills in Yiddish.
                                                                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                            YDSH 508-401 RDGS IN MOD YIDDISH LIT HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB 3N6 T 0430PM-0730PM This course will survey modern Yiddish literature through readings of Yiddish prose and poetry from the end of the 19th century through the late 20th century. The class will be conducted in both Yiddish and English. Reading knowledge of Yiddish is required, although some texts will be available in English translation. Authors include I.L. Peretz, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Moyshe-Leyb Halpern, and Kadya Molodowsky.
                                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION