Graduate Division

Spotlight

It Takes a Village to Make a Movie (Video)

Ph.D. Candidate Helena de Llanos’ dissertation jumps from the page to the screen.

Listening to Cyborgs (Video)

Doctoral candidates Roksana Filipowska and Maria Murphy create a series of workshops that explore sound technologies and their impact on our daily lives.

When Earthworms Are Earth Savers

Emma Harrison, a doctoral candidate in earth and environmental science, examines the role of these natural excavators in topsoil stability.

Redefining Affirmative Action

A. Rahman Ford examines affirmative action policies on a global scale—while fighting for his health at home.

You Say You Want a Revolution. Then What?

Teece fellow Doğa Kerestecioğlu, a Ph.D. candidate in sociology, is studying how national revolutions turn into national governments.

Welcome to the Graduate Division of Penn's School of Arts and Sciences.

The Graduate Division consists of some 33 graduate programs. Disciplinary strength is at the heart of Penn's excellence in research and graduate training. Equally important, however, is the spirit of interdisciplinary collaboration that pervades all of our programs.

News

  • Extreme Rainfall Doesn’t Always Mean Extreme Erosion

    In the Puerto Rican rain forest, a strong storm can drop a meter of rain in a single day. All that water rushes into mountain rivers and causes a torrent as the water overflows the riverbanks and charges downstream. It seems intuitive that the force of so much water would lead to massive erosion of a riverbed. But according to a new study, that intuition is incorrect.

  • Penn Joins in $40 Million Grant to Establish Simons Observatory

    The Simons Foundation has awarded a $38.4 million grant to establish the Simons Observatory, a new astronomy facility in Chile’s Atacama Desert that will merge and expand existing efforts to explore the evolution of the universe from its earliest moments to today. An additional $1.7 million of support is being provided by the Heising-Simons Foundation.

  • Michael Platt Earns NIH Award for Neural Circuitry Work

    Michael Platt, James S. Riepe University Professor, has received a five-year, $2.9 million Method to Extend Research In Time, or MERIT, award from the National Institute of Mental Health to continue his work on the neural circuits that mediate complex social cognition.