Core Faculty

The Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Program and Alice Paul Center's Core Research Faculty are Penn professors and lecturers who have women, gender, or sexuality as a primary area of their research and who commit to sharing their latest research in faculty seminars and colloquia at least once every three years. We count on our Core Research Faculty to keep The Alice Paul Center and Penn on the cutting edge of new scholarship in gender, sexuality, and women’s studies.

The Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Program and Alice Paul Center's Core Teaching Faculty are Penn professors and lecturers who teach one undergraduate or graduate-level cross-listed GSWS course on a regular basis. We count on our Core Teaching Faculty to teach courses on a regular rotating basis so that undergraduates and graduate students may fulfill the requirements of the major, minor, or graduate certificate.

If you are interested in becoming a member of the GSWS Core Research Faculty, please email Melanie Adley for more information.

 Melanie

Melanie Adley
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Melanie Adley is the Associate Director of the Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies Program and of the Alice Paul Center. Her teaching and research interests include feminist and queer theory, gender and sexuality studies, as well as nineteenth- and twentieth-century German and Austrian literature and culture. Read More

 

 

David Azzolina 

David Azzolina
Core Teaching Faculty

David is a librarian in Van Pelt Library's Research and Instructional Services department. He is also an instructor in Folklore at Penn. His research concerns the study of oral narrative in everyday life. Presently David's collection responsibilities include Religion, Folklore, and the History and Sociology of Science. David manages the Reference collection at Van Pelt, and is the bibliographer for the Yarnall collection, a specialized Anglican studies collection. David has published articles on multiculturalism in the American West, and has contributed to the Guide to Reference Books and a range of other library publications.  Read More

 Rita Barnard

Rita Barnard
Core Research and Teaching Faculty

Rita Barnard, who received her Ph.D. from Duke University, is currently Professor of English.  She also holds an appointment as Professor Extraordinaire at the University of Stellenbosch. Her scholarly interests include postcolonial studies (especially African and South African literature), modernism, globalization and transnational cultural studies, twentieth-century American literature, and contemporary women writers. In 2005 she received the Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching.  To date, she has published two books: The Great Depression and the Culture of Abundance and Apartheid and Beyond: South African Writers and the Politics of Place.  Read More

 Karen Beckmen 

Karen Beckmen
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Karen Beckmen is currently working on a short book entitled Animation and the Contemporary Art of War, as well as an edited volume entitled Animating Film Theory, which will explore the challenges animation poses for the discourse of film theory. Prior publications include: Vanishing Women: Magic, Film and Feminism, which examines the relationship between the elusive female body and the medium of film; Crash: Cinema and the Politics of Speed and Stasis which includes chapters on early cinema, slapstick comedy, educational safety films, Warhol, and contemporary disaster films.  Read More

 

 

 Nancy Bentley 

Nancy Bentley
Core Research Faculty

Nancy Bentley's research interests include law and literature, theory of the novel, African American studies, social theory, and cinema and media. She is the author of Frantic Panoramas: American Literature and Mass Culture 1870-1920 and The Ethnography of Manners. She also co-authored Volume 3 of the Cambridge History of American Literature and the Bedford Cultural Edition of Charles Chesnutt’s The Marrow of Tradition. Recent essays include “The Fourth Dimension: Kinlessness and African American Narrative”, and “Creole Kinship: Privacy, Politics, and the Novel in the New World,” in The Oxford Handbook of Nineteenth-Century American Literature.  Read More

 Toni Bowers

Toni Bowers

Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Toni Bowers research and writing focus particularly on how representations of intimate relations shaped and reinforced distributions of power during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. She publishes and teaches on writing by and about women, ideologically driven and partisan political writing (which, she maintains, are not the same thing), the discursive construction of "Great Britain," and early prose fiction in England and Scotland.Read More

  

Linda Chance
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Linda Chance's primary research is on medieval prose writings and their reception by later readers, with a particular focus on the literary miscellany genre. She is the author of Formless in Form: Kenkô, Tsurezuregusa, and the Rhetoric of Japanese Fragmentary Prose, as well as articles on the canonization of the miscellany. She approaches Japanese prose with special attention to Buddhist thought, linguistic and knowledge practices, genre theory, musical transmission of literary texts, and gender, which is at the core of her current project on the role of the feminine in Japanese literature as presented both by female and masquerading male authors.  Read More

 Cynthia Connolly

Cynthia Connolly
Core Teaching Faculty

Cynthia Connolly's research analyzes the forces that have shaped children's health care delivery and family policy in the United States. Her current study addresses four major health policy issues: how beliefs about children and their place in American society informed policy debates surrounding pharmaceuticals for children; how stakeholders have responded to debates about use, testing, advertising, and regulation of pharmaceuticals for children; how ideas about children's best interests shifted over time and shaped health policy; and how politics and legislative and regulatory choices led to reforms with both intended and unintended consequences.  Read More

 Patricia D'Antonio

Patricia D'Antonio

Core Research Faculty

Patricia D'Antonio is a nurse and historian whose body of scholarship situates the profession's work and worth in both American hospitals and health care agencies and in the fabric of families and communities. Her research is the first to call attention to nurses' dual sources of power and her work analyzes how the profession can authoritatively use them in constructing the new relationships and alliances that will strengthen nurses' agency, voice, and presence in debates about issues affecting patients, families, communities, and health care systems in the United States and around the world. Read More

 

Helen Davies

Core Teaching Faculty

Helen Davies was selected the 1999 recipient of the Lifetime Mentor Award of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2003 she was elected to rank of Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science. In 2005 she received the Alice Evans Award of the American Society of Microbiology for her excellence in microbiology. She has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from Women of Color at Penn. Teaching is very important to her and she has received 39 major teaching awards, including Penn’s All-University Lindback Award for Distinguished Teaching; one of the two Distinguished Basic Science Educator Awards, awards given in the Medical School; and the Trustees Council of Penn Women’s Award for Generations of Academic Excellence. ” Nationally, she is the first woman to ever receive the American Medical Student Association’s National Excellence in Teaching Award (March, 2001). Read More

 DeJean

Joan DeJean
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Joan DeJean's research focuses on 17th- and 18th-century French literature. Her most recent books reflect her areas of research: the history of women's writing in France (Tender Geographies: Women and the Origins of the Novel in France); the history of sexuality (Fictions of Sappho, 1546-1937); the development of the novel (Literary Fortifications); and the cultural history of late 17th- and early 18th-century France (The Essence of Style). She was the winner of the 2003 MLA Aldo and Jeanne Scaglione Prize for French and Francophone Studies for her book The Reinvention of Obscenity: Sex, Lies, and Tabloids in Early Modern France.  Read More

  Dombrowski

André Dombrowski
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

André Dombrowski is Assistant Professor of Art History. Professor Dombrowski’s research centers on the art and material culture of France, Germany and Britain in the mid to late nineteenth century, with an emphasis on cross-national developments in the histories of science, politics, psychology, and sexuality. He is particularly concerned with the social and intellectual rationales behind the emergence of avant-garde painting in the 1860s and 1870s, including Impressionism. Winner of the 2009 Phillips Book Prize from the Center for the Study of Modern Art at The Phillips Collection in Washington, D. C., he is currently completing a book entitled Cézanne, Murder and Modern Life, forthcoming from the University of California Press in the fall of 2012. Read more

 Julie Fairman 

Julie Fairman
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Julie Fairman is a nurse historian whose work on the history of 20th Century health care represents a track record of consistent funding, including fellowships from the NLM, NEH and RWJ. Her work on the history of critical care earned her awards from the American Association of the History of Nursing and her first book, Critical Nursing: A History, received favorable reviews in the national and regional popular press and from reviewers in professional journals.  Read More 

 

Tulia Falleti
Core Research Faculty

Tulia Falleti is the author of Decentralization and Subnational Politics in Latin America (Cambridge University Press, 2010), which earned the Donna Lee Van Cott Award to the best book in political institutions by the Latin American Studies Association. Her articles on federalism, decentralization, authoritarianism, and qualitative methods have appeared in the American Political Science Review, Comparative Political Studies, Publius, Studies in Comparative International Development, Qualitative Sociology, among other journals and edited volumes printed in the United States, the United Kingdom, France, Argentina, Mexico, and Brazil.  She is the coeditor, with Adam Sheingate and Orfeo Fioretos, of the Oxford Handbook of Historical Institutionalism, scheduled to be published in 2014-5. Professor Falleti is working on her second single-authored book, which studies the structural and institutional determinants as well as the political and welfare consequences of local community participation.  Read More

 Ann Farnsworth Alvear

Ann Farnsworth-Alvear
Core Teaching Faculty

Ann Farnsworth-Alvear teaches Latin American History and directs the Program in Latin American Studies. She has a special interest in working-class history, gender studies, and oral history. She is author of Dulcinea in the Factory: Myths, Morals, Men and Women in Colombia's Industrial Experiment, 1905-1960, winner of the Allan Sharlin Prize of the Social Science History Association and and the Bolton-Johnson Prize of the Conference on Latin American History. Her current research focuses on the Colombian Choco and the history of race in Latin America.  Read More

 

Siyen Fei

Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Siyen Fei's work to date is primarily concerned with the political and cultural activism of sixteenth- and early seventeenth-century Ming dynasty China (1368-1644). Examining the action of wide-ranging historical actors—women, urbanites, and border residents—she engages and expands the new scholarly paradigm of “defiant late Ming energy” that re-visions a society formerly considered submissive to an all-powerful imperium. In particular, her research on gender, urbanization and empire breaks new grounds by exploring how this emerging state-society dynamics drove and shaped unprecedented transformations in Chinese history: A patriarchal system subverted by court-promoted control of female sexuality; an idealized rural empire facing drastic waves of urbanization; a self-proclaimed Han-native Chinese polity destabilized by cross-border migration and resultant de-sinicization. Excavating these paradoxical historical movements, her books uncover fascinating stories about the interplay of structure and agency.Read More

 Gadsen

Vivian L. Gadsen
Core Teaching Faculty

Dr. Gadsden’s research interests focus on cultural and social factors affecting learning and literacy across the life-course and within families, particularly those at the greatest risk for academic and social vulnerability. Her writing focuses on intergenerational learning, particularly on the relationships between literacy in families and issues of culture, race, gender, and poverty in diverse learning contexts. Her research studies examine the intergenerational and cross-cultural nature of learning, literacy, and identity within families and the relationship between family members' beliefs and practices around learning, educational access, and educational persistence. Her conceptual framework, family cultures, focuses on the interconnectedness among families' political, cultural, and social histories and racialized identities. Read More

 

Kathryn Hellerstein

Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Kathryn Hellerstein is a poet, translator, and scholar of Yiddish poetry, Hellerstein. Her many scholarly articles on Yiddish literature, and most recently, on women poets in Yiddish, are published in journals, anthologies, and encyclopedias. Hellerstein's books include her translation and study of Moyshe-Leyb Halpern's poems, In New York: A Selection, (Jewish Publication Society, 1982), Paper Bridges: Selected Poems of Kadya Molodowsky (Wayne State University Press, 1999), and Jewish American Literature: A Norton Anthology, of which she is co-editor (W. W. Norton, 2001). Read More

 Nancy Hirschmann 

Nancy Hirschmann
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Nancy Hirschmann works in the history of political thought, analytical philosophy and feminist theory. Her newest book, Gender, Class, and Freedom in Modern Political Theory considers the concept of freedom as it developed in the canon of political thought from the 17th to 19th centuries and examines how issues of gender and class affected the dominant conceptions of freedom.  Her previous book, The Subject of Liberty: Toward a Feminist Theory of Freedom, took a more contemporary approach and considered the concept of freedom in the context of political and social issues such as domestic violence, Islamic veiling, and U.S. welfare reform.  Read More

 Eun-Ok Im

Eun-Ok Im
Core Research Faculty

Eun-Ok Im is Professor and Marjorie O. Rendell Endowed Professor in Healthy Nursing Transitions in the School of Nursing Science.  Dr. Im's program of research can be described as feminist-driven Internet research on gender and ethnic differences in health/illness experience of midlife women. Here, “feminist-driven” means that a feminist perspective was used to philosophically and theoretically guide the research process from conceptualization to dissemination of research findings. Dr. Im's doctoral research and post-doctoral study focused on international cross-cultural women’s health research. Then, her work extended to oncology areas, and she developed Internet research methodology as an area of expertise.  Read More

 Jerry Jacobs 

Jerry Jacobs
Core Research Faculty

Jerry Jacobs research has addressed a number of aspects of women's employment, including authority, earnings, working conditions, part-time work and work-family conflict, and entry into male-dominated occupations. His most recent book, The Changing Face of Medicine, with Ann Boulis, is a multi-faceted portrayal of women’s entry into the medical profession over the last 30 years. This project examines the lives and careers of busy professionals, themes that were developed in his earlier book, The Time Divide, with Kathleen Gerson. Jacobs’ current research projects include a study of interdisciplinary scholarly communication.  Read More

 Jaji 

Tsitsi Jaji
Core Research Faculty

Tsitsi Jaji's primary research interests continue to be transnational black cultural relations and exchanges, the relationship between music and literature, theorizations of listening, and Africana expressions of feminism. On occasion she revisits a former self as an Oberlin-trained pianist, however her primary commitment is to literary studies, which she believes can be transformative by training the imagination and powers of observation and empathy.  She has published articles and book chapters on Nafissatou Diallo, Édouard Glissant, Maryse Condé, Toni Morrison, Derek Walcott, and most recently Keorapetse (Willie) Kgositsile, as well as a handful of poems in obscure but treasured small press journals.  Read More

 Ayako Kano

Ayako Kano
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Ayako Kano's research focuses on the intersection of gender, performance, and politics, as well as on Japanese cultural history of the late 19th to early 20th century. Her first book focused on the first generation of actresses in modern Japanese theater. She is currently writing a book about Japanese feminist debates from the 1890s to present. Future projects include a cross-cultural analysis of the medieval Japanese noh theater, as well as a book on film actresses and female spectatorship. Select publications: Acting Like a Woman in Modern Japan: Theater, Gender, and Nationalism and “Towards a Critique of Transhistorical Femininity.  Read More

 Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet

Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet teaches courses on various aspects of modern Middle Eastern history, including ethnic and political conflicts, gender and women's issues, popular culture, diplomatic history, revolutionary ideologies, and general surveys. Her book, Frontier Fictions: Shaping the Iranian Nation, 1804-1946 discusses Iranian nationalism and analyzes the significance of land and border disputes, with attention to Iran 's shared boundaries with the Ottoman Empire (later Iraq and Turkey), Central Asia, Afghanistan, and the Persian Gulf region. She is also completing a book on America 's historical relationship with Iran and the Islamic world.  Read More

  KazanjianDavid Kazanjian
Core Research Faculty

David Kazanjian is Associate Professor of English. His area of specialization is transnational American literary and historical studies through the nineteenth century. His book, The Colonizing Trick: National Culture and Imperial Citizenship in Early America (Minnesota), offers a comparative study of colonial and antebellum, racial and national formations, and a critique of the formal egalitarianism that animated early U.S. citizenship. He is currently completing The Brink of Freedom: Improvising Life in the Nineteenth-Century Atlantic World, a study of three nineteenth-century social movements (immigration to Liberia; race and insanity in the 1840 US census and the Creole slave ship revolt; and the Caste War of Yucatán) that improvised with the discourse and practice of freedom. Read More

 Demie Kurz 

Demie Kurz
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Demie Kurz's primary research and teaching interests are in contemporary issues of gender, with a specific focus on the family.  She has written on the topics of divorce and domestic violence and also has a strong interest in the area of "carework".  She is currently writing a book on how parents and teenagers negotiate teens' adolescence. Along with several others, she is a founding member of the Carework Network, a network of researchers, policy makers, and practitioners who are concerned with promoting research and policy on carework.  Read More

 Andrew Lamas 

Andrew Lamas
Core Teaching Faculty

Andrew Lamas research concerns the theoretical and practical dimensions, as well as the philosophical and religious bases, of social justice and economic democracy — in the context of urbanization. He teaches courses for students pursuing degrees and careers in economic development, community development finance, NGO/non-profit leadership, and related fields. He participates in the Global Gender Group sponsored by the Women’s Studies Program, and he is an Affiliated Faculty of Women's Studies and the Alice Paul Center as well as a Faculty Affiliate of the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Center.  Read More

 Robin Leidner 

Robin Leidner
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Robin Leidner's research concerns the relation between structural conditions of employment and its interactional components, as well as how work arrangements draw on and affect cultural understandings of the ways people do and should relate to each other. In Fast Food, Fast Talk: Service Work and the Routinization of Everyday Life, she examined what happens when organizations try to standardize interactions between workers and customers.  Her current research involves low-status jobs in which people had incentives to separate themselves from the identity their work conferred.   Read More

 

Beth Linker

Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Beth Linker's research and teaching interests include social and cultural history of U.S., medicine and surgery in the 19th and 20th centuries, disability history, war studies, history of medicine, the body, surgery, American health policy, bioethics, public health; gender and health; history and sociology of medicalization. Read More

 Ania Loomba

Ania Loomba
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Ania Loomba researches and teaches early modern literature, histories of race and colonialism, postcolonial studies, feminist theory, and contemporary Indian literature and culture. Her writings include Gender, Race, Renaissance DramaColonialism/ Postcolonialism and Shakespeare, Race, and Colonialism. She has co-edited Post-colonial ShakespearesPostcolonial Studies and BeyondRace in Early Modern England: A Documentary Companion. Her latest publication is a critical edition of Shakespeare's Antony and Cleopatra and a co-edited collection of essays Feminisms in South Asia: Contemporary Interventions is forthcoming from Duke University Press.  Read More

 Heather Love 

Heather Love
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Heather Love's areas of interest include gender studies and queer theory, the literature and culture of modernity, affect studies, film and visual culture, psychoanalysis, race and ethnicity, sociology and literature, and critical theory. She is the author of Feeling Backward: Loss and the Politics of Queer History (Harvard, 2007) and the co-editor of a special issue of New Literary History ("Is There Life after Identity Politics?"). She is currently at work on a book on the source materials for Erving Goffman's 1963 book, Stigma: On the Management of Spoiled Identity ("The Stigma Archive").  Read More

 

 

 Catriona MacLeod

Catriona MacLeod
Core Research Faculty

Catriona MacLeod is Professor of German. Professor MacLeod studied at the University of Glasgow, Scotland (M.A.) and at Harvard (Ph.D.). Her research, which focuses on late eighteenth-century and nineteenth-century literature and culture, has the following emphases: gender studies, in particular literary and aesthetic figurations of androgyny; the intersections between high art and popular culture in Weimar Classicism; the relationship between verbal and visual arts. She has published on figures such as Winckelmann, Goethe, Bertuch, Kleist, Brentano, and Stifter. The author of Embodying Ambiguity: Androgyny and Aesthetics from Winckelmann to Keller, MacLeod has completed another book project, All that is Solid Melts into Air: Literature and Sculpture in the German Nineteenth Century, forthcoming in 2012 from Northwestern U P. 
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 Janice Madden

Janice Madden
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Janice Madden's research deals with the influence of demographics and/or spatial structure on the workings of the labor market, concentrating on the study of discrimination and of spatial immobility in the labor market. Her research can be grouped into the following topics: (1) the influence of discrimination and of government policies to eliminate discrimination on labor market outcomes; (2) the extent and effects of spatial immobility in local labor markets; and (3) differences in growth in income and earnings inequality in American cities. Her books include The Economics of Sex Discrimination and
Changes in Income Inequality within U.S. Metropolitan AreasRead More

 

Rosemary Malague
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

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Milton W. Meyer
Core Teaching Faculty

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  Mayeri

Serena Mayeri
Core Research Faculty

Serena Mayeri’s scholarship focuses on the historical impact of progressive and conservative social movements on legal and constitutional change. Her book, Reasoning from Race: Feminism, Law, and the Civil Rights Revolution, was recently published by Harvard University Press.

Mayeri's current project examines the history of challenges to marriage's primacy as a legal institution and a source of public and private benefits. She teaches courses in family law, employment discrimination, gender and the law, and legal history. Read More

 Carol Muller

Carol Muller

Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Carol Muller is a Professor of Music (ethnomusicology), who has published widely on South African music, both at home and in exile.  Her intellectual interests include the relationship between music, gender and religious studies, migration and diaspora studies, and critical ethnography.  Musical Echoes: South African Women Thinking in Jazz (Duke Fall 2011) with Sathima Bea Benjamin; Shembe Hymns (Univ. of KwaZulu Natal 2010);  Focus: South African Music (Routledge 2008); Rituals of Fertility and the Sacrifice of Desire: Nazarite Women’s Performance in South Africa (Chicago 1999) are some of the books she has authored and edited.  Read More

 MurnaghanSheila (Bridget) Murnaghan
Core Research Faculty

Sheila Murnaghan is Professor of Classical Studies, Alfred Reginald Allen Memorial Professor of Greek and Faculty Director of the Post-baccalaureate Program in Classical Studies. Her research areas include Greek literature, especially epic, tradegy, and historiography, gender in classical culture, and classical reception. Recent publications include, "Tragic Bystanders: Choruses and Other Survivors in the Plays of Sophocles," in J. R. C. Cousland and James R. Hume, edd. The Play of Texts and Fragments: Essays in Honour of Martin Cropp, (Leiden: Brill, 2009): 321–333 and "The Memorable Past: Antiquity and Girlhood in the Works of Mary Butts and Naomi Mitchison," Remaking the Classics: Literature, Genre and Media in Britain, 1800-2000, ed. Christopher Stray (London 2007) 125-139. Read more

 Anne Norton 

Anne Norton
Core Research Faculty

Anne Norton's research concerns identity and history, gender and race, colonialism and post colonialism and tradition and revolution.  Her publications include Leo Strauss and the Politics of American Empire95 Theses on Politics, Culture, and MethodRepublic of Signs: Liberal Theory and American Popular CultureReflections on Political Identity and Alternative Americas: A Reading of Antebellum Political Culture.  Read More

 Sharrona Pearl

Sharrona Pearl
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Sharrona Pearl is an Assistant Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication at the University of Pennsylvania. An expert on physiognomy – the study of facial features and their relationship to character traits – she previously was a post-doctoral fellow in the Committee on Degrees in History and Literature and in the Department of the History of Science at Harvard University.  She is the author of About Faces: Physiognomy in Ninetheenth-Century Britain (Harvard UP: 2010).  Read More
 Kathy Peiss 

Kathy Peiss
Core Teaching Faculty

Kathy Peiss's research has examined the history of working women; working-class and interracial sexuality; leisure, style, and popular culture; the beauty industry in the U.S. and abroad; and print culture and cultural policy during World War II.  She is particularly interested in the ways that commerce and culture have shaped the everyday life and popular beliefs of Americans across time.  Peiss is the author of Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York and Hope in a Jar: The Making of America's Beauty Culture, which was a finalist for the Los Angeles Times Book Award and named one of Amazon's 1999 top ten books in Women's Studies.  Read More

 Chris Poggi 

Christine Poggi
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Christine Poggi's current research projects comprise essays on Picasso's early constructed guitars; newspaper's function as a temporal marker in contemporary art; the nexus of law and image in the performative works of several contemporary artists (Michelangelo Pistoletto, Teching Hsieh, Santiago Sierra, and Chantal Akerman); and the multi-media "Meta-Futurist" project of contemporary artist Luca Buvoli. She is interested in the relations of modern art and technology, in how art engages mass publics, and in contemporary works of art that propose new models of avant-garde temporality and of social intervention.  Read More

 Melissa Sanchez 

Melissa E. Sanchez
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Melissa Sanchez studies and teaches sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature, with a particular focus on gender, sexuality, and constitutional and religious history. Professor Sanchez has been an Andrew W. Mellon Fellow at the Huntington Library, and in 2009 she received Penn's Edmund J. and Louise W. Kahn Award for Distinguished Teaching by an Assistant Professor. Her first book, Erotic Subjects: The Sexuality of Politics in Early Modern English Literature, examines how sixteenth- and seventeenth-century writers used scenarios of erotic violence and cross-gender identification to explore the origins and limits of political allegiance.  Read More

   
 

Marilyn (Lynn) Sawyer Sommers
Core Research Faculty

Dr. Sommers is the Lillian S. Brunner Professor of Medical-Surgical Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania. She received her bachelors degree in nursing at the University of Pennsylvania, her masters degree in nursing education from New York University, and her PhD in nursing science with a minor in human physiology at The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio. She received postdoctoral training as a Faculty Fellow through the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism from 1990-1994 at the University of Cincinnati. Prior to her academic career, Dr. Sommers had 15 years of experience as a staff nurse, clinical nurse specialist, and nurse administrator in the areas of critical care and trauma.
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 Brian Spooner 

Brian Spooner
Core Research Faculty

Brian Spooner's research interests include cultural and social anthropology, globalization, the Middle East, South Asia, Central Asia, social organization, Islam, religion, ethnohistory, ecology and non-industrial economies.  Publications include Reading Nasta'liq: Persian and Urdu Hands 1500 to the PresentEntry to Advanced Turkish, American Association of Teachers of Turkish, Literacy in the Persianate World: Writing and the Social Order, Population Growth: Anthropological Implications and Language Policy in Afghanistan and adjacent countries.  Read More

 Jeanne Stanley 

Jeanne Stanley
Core Teaching Faculty

Jeanne Stanley provides education, training, and supervision predominantly in the area of professional counseling. Her teaching and research focus on counseling and sociocultural psychology, with an emphasis on intervention and prevention services for underserved populations. She has worked as a psychologist at the Boston University Counseling Center and Fenway Community Health Center and as a counselor in various elementary, secondary schools, colleges, and universities. She is a licensed psychologist and maintains a private practice. She is the director of training for the Conill Institute for Chronic Disabilities and in the past was director of the Bryson Institute.   Read More

 

Anne Teitelman
Core Research Faculty

Anne Teitelman's research focuses on HIV prevention among adolescents and in understanding intimate partner violence as an HIV risk factor. She is currently developing an HIV prevention intervention for adolescent girls with a history of partner abuse who attend family planning clinics. Another one of her current projects involves examining narratives of minority urban adolescents in opposite sex relationships in order to inform prevention of HIV/STI and partner abuse. She is interested in promoting health and equity of the girl child internationally and in the role of primary care providers in health promotion and advocacy.  Read More

 S Tillet

Salamishah Tillet
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Salamishah Tillet is an Assistant Professor of English, Africana Studies, and Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies. Her research interests include twentieth-century African-American literature, film, popular music, cultural studies, and feminist theory. Her book Sites of Slavery: Citizenship and Racial Democracy in the Post-Civil Rights Imagination (Duke University Press, 2012) examines why and how contemporary African American artists, writers, and intellectuals remember antebellum slavery within post-Civil Rights America. She is currently working on a book-length project on the civil rights icon, Nina Simone. Read More

 

 Deborah Thomas

Deborah A. Thomas
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Deborah Thomas's research interests include nationalism and alternative sovereignties, globalization, race and gender, labor migration, transnationalism and diaspora, cultural politics, performance, violence and the transformation of space, culture and political economy, popular culture and the Caribbean.  Recent publications include Modern Blackness: Nationalism, Globalization, and the Politics of Culture in Jamaica, Globalization and Race: Transformations in the Cultural Production of Blackness, Blackness Across BordersThe Violence of Diaspora and Exceptional Violence: Embodied Citizenship in the Transnational Jamaica.  Read More

 Carol Tracy 

Carol E. Tracy
Core Teaching Faculty

Carol Tracy has been working to advance women’s rights for the past thirty years.  Carol became the Executive Director the Women’s Law Project in 1990, and she has presided over major legal victories in the areas of reproductive rights, discrimination in employment, education, athletics, and welfare.  Her recent work has involved several initiatives regarding Violence Against Women, including leading a major reform effort on the police handling of sex crimes in Philadelphia, and co-chairing a city-wide task force on domestic violence.  Read More

 

 

  Wahlert

Lance Wahlert
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Lance Wahlert is Assistant Professor of Medicine and Program Director of the Master of Bioethics (MBE) in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy in the Perelman School of Medicine. Dr. Wahlert is also the Director of the Project on Bioethics, Sexuality, and Gender Identity, which has demarcated a sub-field within bioethics that focuses on the intersection of LGBTQ issues and medical ethics. Dr. Wahlert’s scholarly interests include the historiographical legacy of the healthcare concerns of LGBTQ persons, the impact of cinematic genres on cultural histories, and the relationship between literary narratives and clinical forms of storytelling. Read More

 Tamara Walker

Tamara J. Walker
Core Research Faculty

Tamara Walker is currently completing a book manuscript based on her doctoral dissertation, titled Ladies and Gentlemen, Slaves and Citizens: Dressing the Part in Lima, 1723-1845 , which focuses on the relationship between clothing and status in an ethnically diverse slaveholding society, with particular attention to the meanings given to dress and deportment both by subordinate members of the society and by those who presumed to control them. She is the author of “‘He outfitted his family in notable decency': Slavery, Honor, and Dress in Eighteenth-Century Lima, Peru,” Slavery and Abolition: A Journal of Slave & Post-Slave Studies 30, No. 3 (September 2009), pp. 383-402.  Read More

 Barbra Wall 

Barbra Mann Wall
Core Research Faculty

Barbra Mann Wall's research involves the history of Catholic hospitals and sister-nurses as well as oral histories of retired nurses. Her work illustrates the gendered story of hospital establishments and the nursing profession. The overriding theoretical foundation is the interplay between religious and secular institutions and the place of that interplay in American social history. Her recent work addresses the history of disaster nursing in the Southwest and the range of discourses people drew upon when interpreting disasters of the past. Her research has been utilized in the classroom and in other academic and public settings.  Read More

 David Wallace

David Wallace
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

David Wallace is a medievalist who looks forward to the early modern period; he works on English and Italian matters with additional interests in French, German, women's writing, romance, "discovery" of the Americas and the history of slavery, and Europe.  His most recent book is Strong Women: http://blog.oup.com/2011/05/strong-women/ He is currently editing the first literary history of Europe, 1348-1418, which is organized not by 'national blocks' but by nine sequences of places, or itineraries. It assumes that the space of 'Europe' becomes intelligible only through dialogue with that which forms its 'outside,' or dialogues with it.  There is an interactive website to support this project

 Liliane Weissberg 

Liliane Weissberg
Core Teaching and Research Faculty

Liliane Weissberg's interests focus on late eighteenth-century to early twentieth-century German literature and philosophy. Much of her work has concentrated on German, European, and American Romanticism, but she has also written on the notion of representation in realism, on photography, and on literary and feminist theory. Among her more recent books are a critical edition of Hannah Arendt's Rahel Varnhagen: The Life of a Jewess, the anthologies Cultural Memory and the Construction of IdentityRomancing the Shadow: Poe and Race,  Picture This! Writing with Photography, and Hannah Arendt und die Frankfurter Schule.  Read More

 Beth Wenger

Beth S. Wenger
Core Research Faculty

Beth Wenger's most recent book is History Lessons: The Creation of American Jewish Heritage (Princeton University Press, 2010). She is also the author of New York Jews and the Great Depression: Uncertain Promise(Yale University Press, 1996), which was awarded the Salo Baron Prize in Jewish History from the American Academy of Jewish Research, as well as author of The Jewish Americans: Three Centuries of Jewish Voices in America (Doubleday Press, 2007), which was named a National Jewish Book Award finalist.  Read More

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