Shenila Khoja-Moolji

Visiting Scholar, Alice Paul Center for Research on Gender, Sexuality and Women

Email

skhoja@sas.upenn.edu

Office Location

3810 Walnut Street
Suite 206

profile summary

Shenila Khoja-Moolji research interests include examining discourses on gender and education, and their entanglement with practices of power. At Penn, Dr. Khoja-Moolji plans to complete her book manuscript, tentatively entitled Gender, Education, and Governmentality: The Making of Educated Female Muslim Subjects in Colonial India and Postcolonial Pakistan (1857-2015). She will also launch research for her next project that explores the promises of, and attachments to, the figure of the ‘global citizen.’

profile

Shenila Khoja-Moolji received her doctorate in Education and additional certification in Feminist Theory from Columbia University in 2016. Her research interests include examining discourses on gender and education, and their entanglement with practices of power. Dr. Khoja-Moolji’s work problematizes the centering of girls’ education and empowerment as a solution to societal problems, especially in relation to Muslim-majority nations. Specifically, she interrogates universalistic notions of girlhood, empowerment, and rights embedded in past and present calls for women’s and girls’ education, and in doing so highlights the raced, gendered, and religioned configurations of citizenship that emerge in and through humanitarian discourses. Dr. Khoja-Moolji has written extensively about the convergence on the figure of the girl in transnational development regimes. She also investigates education policy discourses as they relate to immigrants in the United States and teacher development in the global South. At Penn, Dr. Khoja-Moolji plans to complete her book manuscript, tentatively entitled Gender, Education, and Governmentality: The Making of Educated Female Muslim Subjects in Colonial India and Postcolonial Pakistan (1857-2015). She will also launch research for her next project that explores the promises of, and attachments to, the figure of the ‘global citizen.’ This interdisciplinary project draws on theories of affect, biopolitics, and gender to illuminate global citizenship to be a discursive enterprise that is imagined as being accessible to all and inevitable for peace, but built on a number of marginalizations and exclusions