News & Events
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The Middle East Center at Penn sponsors and supports programs and initiatives across the disciplines and professional schools, and runs a dynamic outreach program in the Delaware Valley. Faculty and students at Penn are also active and prominent in the field of Middle East studies, making significant and highly regarded contributions to scholarly output in their areas of interest. We will continue to update news of the Center's activities and highlight the achievements of our faculty and students here.

Feb
13
Dr. Sarah Sharp / Workshop for K-12 Educators In Fall 2015, Philadelphia became the first World Heritage City in the United States. Our city joins an elite list of over 250 cities in UNESCO's World Heritage Cities program (such as Brasilia, Cairo, Timbuktu, and Vienna). Independence Hall, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is the birthplace of the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. This site signifies our country's role in establishing modern democracy. Are there World Heritage Sites and Cities that you would like to teach about? Would you like to learn more about World Heritage education? Apply for this free professional development workshop with the opportunity to create a single lesson on a World Heritage Site or City of your own selection. Twenty-five applicants will be selected to participate in this workshop. Saturday, February 13th, 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m. (Breakfast provided)William Penn Charter School3000 W. School House Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19144 Facilitated by Sarah Sharp, Ph.D., 2015-2016 Master Teacher Fellow in Global Education** and social studies teacher in the upper school at William Penn Charter School. Trips to Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Turkey, as well as to Cuba, have formed the foundation for her courses in Global Studies. She has used both blogging and photography, among other media, to create class projects and exhibits. Sarah holds a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from the University of California, San Diego, where she specialized in U.S. and Latin American history. Contact: ssharp@penncharter.com Eligibility:Must be a middle or high school teacher currently employedMust be teaching in a Greater Philadelphia area schoolMust participate in all aspects of the workshop including some pre and post workshop homework Application accepted until midnight January 16th, 2016 APPLY HERE **The Master Teacher Fellowship in Global Education is awarded annually to two K-14 teachers in the Delaware Valley who have shown substantial commitment to incorporating global studies into the school or classroom. Each fellow receives a $500 stipend to be used for conference/training registration, travel to a conference/training, or classroom materials. The Master Teacher Fellows serve as ambassadors for the University of Pennsylvania's Middle East, South Asia and East Asia Centers and lead public workshops for pre-service and current educators. https://www.southasiacenter.upenn.edu/news/announcing-winners-2015-master-teacher-fellowship-global-education
9:00am
3000 W. School House Lane, Philadelphia, PA 19144
Feb
15
Dr. Ranin Kazemi, San Diego State University Join the Middle East Center for an evening with Professor Ranin Kazemi. In this lecture Dr. Kazemi will discuss the Tobacco Protest which swept across Iran and the broader Shi'ite world in 1891-92 and examine its environmental causes. Professor Kazemi earned a Ph.D. in History at Yale University in December 2012. He is interested in social and environmental history with a focus on the Middle East and North Africa, as well as the Caucasus, and Central and South Asia. In August 2012, he joined the Department of History at Kansas State University where he taught courses in a wide variety of topics concerning the history of the Middle East and North Africa, as well as world history, historical methodology, and the international and social history of the Cold War. Beginning this fall, he will join the Department of History at San Diego State University where he will continue teaching and researching on the broader Middle East and North Africa. Professor Kazemi has published in leading journals in his field and is currently working on a book manuscript entitled "The Ecology of Conflict: Privation, Protest, and Populism in Iran, 1850-1892." This project traces the economic, environmental, social, and political origins of one of the earliest national revolutionary movements in the modern Middle East. To complete this work, he has conducted research in Iranian, Turkish, British, French, Dutch, and American archives. His research has been supported by, among others, the International Institute of Social History and the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation and the Charlotte W. Newcombe Foundation, the Council of American Overseas Research Centers, the American Research Institute in Turkey, the American Institute of Iranian Studies, and the Yale University Whitney and Betty MacMillan Center for International and Area Studies.
5:30pm
Fisher - Bennett Hall Room 231 3340 Walnut Street Philadelphia PA, 19104
Feb
18
Dr. Huda J. Fakhreddine (University of Pennsylvania) Join the Middle East Center for a talk presented by Dr. Huda J. Fakhreddine on her recently published book, Metapoesis in the Arabic Tradition. In her new book, Metapoesis in the Arabic Tradition,  Dr. Huda J. Fakhreddine expands the study of metapoesis to include the Abbasid age in Arabic literature. Through this lens that is often used to study modernist poetry of the 20th and the 21st century, the book detects and examines a meta-poetic tendency and a self-reflexive attitude in the poetry of the first century of Abbasid poets. “What and why is poetry?”, these are the types of questions the Abbasid poets asked themselves with the same persistence and urgency their modern successors did. This approach to the poetry of the Abbasid age serves to refresh our sense of what is “modernist” or “poetically new” and detach it from chronology. Dr. Fakhreddine is Assistant Professor of Arabic literature at the University of Pennsylvania. Her work focuses on modernist movements or trends in Arabic poetry and their relationship to the Arabic literary tradition. Dr. Fakhreddine holds an MA in English literature from the American University of Beirut and a PhD in Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations from Indiana University, Bloomington. 
5:30pm
Fisher - Bennett Hall Room 244, 3340 Walnut Street Philadelphia PA, 19104
Feb
22
Dr. Blake Atwood Please join us for a talk on Persian literature organized by the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. The talk is entitled "The Little Devil's Democracy: How Video Technology Changed the Movie Culture in Iran" will be delivered by Dr. Blake Atwood. The lecture is scheduled to take place on February 22 at 5 pm in the Class of 1955 Room (Room 241) of Van Pelt Library. This talk is open to Penn faculty, students, and staff only.
5:00pm
Class of 1955 Room (Room 241) Van Pelt Library.
Feb
24
Director of Penn in Washington, Dr. Martinez and Jake Gutman, Penn Alum, Carnegie Endowment Join the Middle East Center for a lunch workshop on internship and career opportunities in Washington, D.C that utilize a major or minor in Modern Middle East studies. Guest Speakers include: Dr. Martinez, Director of Penn in Washington Dr. Martinez advises several hundred Penn students a year on finding internships in Washington, D.C. and has written, “Washington Internships: How to Get Them and Use Them to Launch Your Public Policy Career,” (Penn Press, February 2009). More recently she has published, “Internships Everywhere: Opportunities Outside the Beltway.” Dr. Martinez teaches several classes about policymaking in the United States and is a pre-major advisor in the College of Arts and Science at Penn. Jake Gutman, Penn Alum, Carnegie Endowment Jake is a junior fellow in the Democracy and Rule of Law program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace in Washington, DC. Prior to joining Carnegie he was a research associate studying the Muslim Brotherhood at Queen’s University Belfast in Northern Ireland. Gutman has had previous experiences at the U.S. Department of State and NBC News Washington Bureau. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from the University of Pennsylvania in Political Science and Modern Middle Eastern Studies. LUNCH WILL BE PROVIDED
12:00pm
Arch Building, Room 108 (3601 Locust Walk)
Feb
29
Dr. Claudia Yaghoobi Please join us for a talk on Persian literature organized by the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations. The talk is entitled "Representation of Sigheh Women in Iranian Cultural Imaginary: Sadegh Chubak’s Sang-e Sabur" will be delivered by Dr. Claudia Yaghoobi. The lecture is scheduled to take place on February 29 at 5 pm in the Class of 1955 Room (Room 241) of Van Pelt Library. This talk is open to Penn faculty, students, and staff only.
5:00pm
Class of 1955 Room (Room 241) Van Pelt Library
Mar
2
Richard Wike, PEW Research Center Richard Wike, Director of Global Attitudes Research Pew Research Center, will discuss the results of Pew Foundation studies regarding attitudes of Middle Eastern nations and people of the United States. “What They Think of Us,” is a part of a lecture series called Iran, The Middle East and ISIS, that addresses the continuing crisis in the Middle East by explaining its historical origins and examining regional attitudes of the United States, as well as focusing on the challenges posed by Iran and the terrorist group ISIS. Visiting scholars will evaluate potential threats to America and the world along with considering prospects for the future. Because of the rapidly changing conditions in the Middle East the lecture topics are subject to change. All Six lectures are free and open to the public and will be on the Blackwood Campus of Camden County College. For more information on the lecture series click here. This event was organized in partnership with the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility (CCLR) at Camden County College. CCLR focuses on the needs and interests of educators and the community at large. Its goal is to create an informed citizenry through exploration of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and issues critical to a democratic society. Citizens have the opportunity to meet scholars, scientists, government officials and business leaders to explore historical and current issues and discuss societal problems and their solutions. Learn more about CCLR here.
7:00pm
Civic Hall, the Connector Building, Blackwood Campus, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Mar
16
Dr. Erika Gilson, American Association of Teachers of Turkic Languages About the Lecture:After briefly talking about alphabets and writing systems, Dr. Erika Gilson, will present the Turkic languages in history, their geographic spread, and principal linguistic markers, as well as the alphabets used for Turkic languages in history. Focusing next on the quest for a Common Alphabet, Dr. Gilson will discuss some of its historic background, namely the 1926 Baku Conference, and the 1991 International Symposium on Contemporary Turkic alphabets, and summarize the current state and discussions relating to alphabet matters amongst the Turkic peoples.  About the Speaker:Erika Gilson taught Turkish and Ottoman Turkish for the Near Eastern Studies department at Princeton University for 26 years before retiring in 2014. Committed to teaching Middle Eastern languages, she was a founding member of the National Council of Less Commonly Taught Languages (NCOLCTL) and the American Association of Teachers of Turkic Languages. She received the A. Ronald Walton Award for Distinguished Service in the Field of Less Commonly Taught Languages in 2008 and the Jere L. Bacharach Service Award from the Middle East Studies Association in 2012. Gilson is currently working on a database to study the effectiveness of writing as an enabling activity for language learning and on the Turkic Notations in Afanasii Nikitin's Voyage Beyond the Three Seas. She has a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.
5:30pm
Fisher - Bennett Hall Room 244, 3340 Walnut Street
Mar
17
Emily Feldman (International Reporter) Priya Ramchandra and Farzana Shah (Pulitizer Fellows 2015) Reporting from northern Iraq and Germany, Emily Feldman looks at how Iraq's Yazidi community is recovering after an attempted genocide at the hands of ISIS fighters in the summer of 2014.  Her reporting has focused on the fate of the estimated 5,000 Yazidis ISIS kidnapped and enslaved, most of whom suffered severe trauma and sexual abuse.  With local authorities overwhelmed by their own battle against the same militants, Yazidis do not have the support they need to treat survivors and secure the release of the remaining captives - matters they are largely taking into their own hands.  Her publications for this project include BBC World Service, Mashable, Al Jazeera America. Emily is based in Istanbul.  Lunch will be provided
12:00pm
Arch Building, Room 108 (3601 Locust Walk)
Mar
21
Anemona Hartocollis, New York Times New York Times journalist, Anemona Hartocollis, has been chosen as the National Resource Centers’ Global Distinguished Lecturer for 2016. In her talk she will discuss her experience following a group of migrants and refugees from the Greek Island of Kos to Denmark. She will explore the struggles, hopes and desires of people she met along the way and ponder the unknown outcomes of this mass exodus from the Middle East and North Africa. Ms. Hartocollis was born in Lausanne, Switzerland and grew up in Topeka, Kansas. She received her bachelor’s degree from Harvard University. Hartocollis has won awards from the Newswomen’s Club of New York Front Page Award, the New York State AP Writing Contest, the Society of Silurians and the Deadline Club of New York Award, among others. Before coming to work as a journalist for the Times, Hartocollis was a reporter and feature writer for the Daily News in New York, Newsday, The Philadelphia Inquirer and the Detroit News. She is the author of Seven Days of Possibilities: One Teacher, 24 Kids and Music that changed their Lives Forever
6:30pm
Widener Lecture Room, Penn Museum 3260 South St, Philadelphia, PA 19104
Mar
23
Dr. Ian Lustick, University of Pennsylvania Ian Lustick, Professor, Bess W. Heyman Chair, Department of Political Science University of Pennsylvania, will explore how the media's disproportionate focus on terrorism in the region leads us astray from vital understanding of the region.  Specific questions will be considered about the important long-run consequences of the War on Terror. He will also try to answer the questions: What international relations theory has to say about Iran, Hezbollah, and nuclear weapons?  Is ISIS an Islamic Movement or is it a cross between the mafia and the Gestapo? “How Much of the Middle East is a Terrorist Problem?” is a part of a lecture series called Iran, The Middle East and ISIS, that addresses the continuing crisis in the Middle East by explaining its historical origins and examining regional attitudes of the United States, as well as focusing on the challenges posed by Iran and the terrorist group ISIS. Visiting scholars will evaluate potential threats to America and the world along with considering prospects for the future. Because of the rapidly changing conditions in the Middle East the lecture topics are subject to change. All Six lectures are free and open to the public and will be on the Blackwood Campus of Camden County College. For more information on the lecture series click here. The event was organized in partnership with the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility (CCLR) at Camden County College. CCLR focuses on the needs and interests of educators and the community at large. Its goal is to create an informed citizenry through exploration of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and issues critical to a democratic society. Citizens have the opportunity to meet scholars, scientists, government officials and business leaders to explore historical and current issues and discuss societal problems and their solutions. Learn more about CCLR here.
7:00pm
Civic Hall, the Connector Building, Blackwood Campus, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Mar
30
Harleen Gambhir, Institute for Study of War Harleen Gambhir, Counterterrorism Analyst, Institute for the Study of War will attempt to answer the questions: What is ISIS doing outside of Iraq and Syria? What threat does ISIS pose to the United States? How has ISIS changed the face of terrorism? “Isis’s Global Strategy and Operations,” is a part of a lecture series called Iran, The Middle East and ISIS, that addresses the continuing crisis in the Middle East by explaining its historical origins and examining regional attitudes of the United States, as well as focusing on the challenges posed by Iran and the terrorist group ISIS. Visiting scholars will evaluate potential threats to America and the world along with considering prospects for the future. Because of the rapidly changing conditions in the Middle East the lecture topics are subject to change. All Six lectures are free and open to the public and will be on the Blackwood Campus of Camden County College. For more information on the lecture series click here. The event was organized in partnership with the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility (CCLR) at Camden County College. CCLR focuses on the needs and interests of educators and the community at large. Its goal is to create an informed citizenry through exploration of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and issues critical to a democratic society. Citizens have the opportunity to meet scholars, scientists, government officials and business leaders to explore historical and current issues and discuss societal problems and their solutions. Learn more about CCLR here.
7:00pm
Civic Hall at the Connector Building, Blackwood Campus, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Apr
6
Dr. Mahyar Entezari, University of Pennsylvania Mahyar Entezari, Lecturer and Coordinator of the Persian Language Program, Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilization, University of Pennsylvania, will examine the role that the historical memory of pre-Islamic Persia has played in Iranian politics and society from the late nineteen to the early twenty-first century. “Ancient Persia in Modern Iran: Nationalism, Nation-Building, and National Identity,” is a part of a lecture series called Iran, The Middle East and ISIS, that addresses the continuing crisis in the Middle East by explaining its historical origins and examining regional attitudes of the United States, as well as focusing on the challenges posed by Iran and the terrorist group ISIS. Visiting scholars will evaluate potential threats to America and the world along with considering prospects for the future. Because of the rapidly changing conditions in the Middle East the lecture topics are subject to change. All Six lectures are free and open to the public and will be on the Blackwood Campus of Camden County College. For more information on the lecture series click here. The event was organized in partnership with the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility (CCLR) at Camden County College. CCLR focuses on the needs and interests of educators and the community at large. Its goal is to create an informed citizenry through exploration of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and issues critical to a democratic society. Citizens have the opportunity to meet scholars, scientists, government officials and business leaders to explore historical and current issues and discuss societal problems and their solutions. Learn more about CCLR here.
7:00pm
Civic Hall, the Connector Building, Blackwood Campus, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Apr
7
Dr. Jacob Mundy, Colgate University About the Film Learn more about what many have dubbed, “the forgotten occupation”, at the Middle East Center screening of the short documentary, “Life is Waiting”. The film is based on the contested territory of Western Sahara. Forty years after its people were promised freedom by departing Spanish colonialists, Western Sahara remains Africa’s last colony. While the 1991 UN-brokered ceasefire put an end to armed hostilities in the area, the Sahrawi people have continued to live under the Moroccan armed forces' rigid occupation. This film explores the diverse cultures of resistance that have developed within Sahrawi communities in Western Sahara and the hope kept alive through large and small acts of rebellion. Pre-Screening Talk and Discussion with Special Guest Dr. Jacob Mundy Dr. Jacob Mundy will provide the audience with an in depth explanation of thegeo-political context that surrounds the region. After the screening he will then lead a discussion about the film where audience members will have a chance to examine a more critical look at the conflict.   About Jacob Mundy Jacob Mundy is an Assistant Professor of Peace and Conflict Studies at Colgate University where he also contributes to courses on Middle Eastern and African studies. He holds a PhD from the University of Exeter's institute of Arab and Islamic Studies where he completed a dissertation on the international dimensions of Algeria's civil conflict of the 1990s. He is coeditor of The Post-Conflict Environment (University of Michigan Press, 2014) and coauthor of Western Sahara: War, Nationalism, and Conflict Irresolution (Syracuse University Press, 2010). His monograph, Imaginative Geographies of Algerian Violence: Conflict Science, Conflict Management, Antipolitics, will be published by Standford University Press in 2015.
5:30pm
Stitler Hall B-26, 208 South 37th Street, Philadlephia PA
Apr
13
Kelsey Rice From the 18th -19th century Turkic intellectual life in the South Caucasus was based around the courts of the various khanates that ruled the region. Intellectuals, who were typically court functionaries, religious teachers, and elite merchants, organized themselves into literary assemblies, where they shared poetry and music and engaged in philosophical debates. By the late nineteenth century the oil boom in Baku re-centered commerce and culture in the region, and wealth and intellectual capital left the mountainous khanates for the Caspian seaside city. A new, literate, bourgeois population appeared in the cities of the region. Many members of this class were reform-minded, and founded enlightenment societies as one of the primary means to mobilize efforts of cultural reform. The legacy of the literary assemblies of the past loomed large in the work of these enlightenment societies, whose members viewed cultural figures from the mid-century as elder statesmen in the project of reforming culture. This presentation traces the dramatic cultural shifts in the nineteenth century South Caucasus, revealing the continuities and changes that occurred in this period of intense cultural production and debate. About the Speaker: Kelsey Rice is a PhD candidate in the Department of History at the University of Pennsylvania. In the academic year 2014-2015 she conducted research in Baku, Azerbaijan and Istanbul, Turkey for her dissertation "Crossroads Intellectuals: Literary Assemblies and Enlightenment Societies in Late 19th and Early 20th Century Azerbaijan" with the support of American Councils for International Education and the Social Science Research Council.
12:00pm
NELC Conference Room, 847 Williams Hall 255 South 36th Stree Philadelphia PA
Apr
13
David Motadel (London School of Economics) At the height of the Second World War, German troops encountered large Muslim populations in North Africa, the Balkans, the Crimea and the Caucasus. Nazi officials saw Islam as a powerful force and one hostile to the same enemies as Germany – the British Empire, the Soviet Union, and Jews. The paper will not only discuss Berlin’s attempts to promote Nazi Germany as a patron of Islam, but also show that the realities on the ground were often very complex: In the first weeks after Hitler’s invasion of the Soviet Union, thousands of Muslims, specifically prisoners of war, were executed by SS squads on the assumption that their circumcision proved that they were Jewish. In North Africa, the Balkans, and the Eastern front, German soldiers were confronted with heterogeneous Muslim populations, including Muslim Roma and Jewish converts to Islam. Historians interested in Nazi Germany’s relations with the Islamic world have so far predominantly focused on the collaboration of prominent figures like the Mufti of Jerusalem. The paper will show that the history of Nazi Germany’s engagement with Islam was far more complex than that. More generally, it will contribute to our broader understanding of the politics of religion in the Second World War. David Motadel will take up an Assistant Professorship in International History at the London School of Economics (LSE) this summer. He studied history at the University of Freiburg (2002-2005) and completed his MPhil (2006) and PhD (2010) in history at the University of Cambridge, where he was a Gates Scholar. He subsequently took up a Research Fellowship in History at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge (2010-15). He has held visiting positions at Harvard (2007-8), Yale (2009-10), and Oxford (2011-12), and he is currently a Chancellor's Fellow at the University of Edinburgh (2015-16). Motadel is the author of 'Islam and Nazi Germany's War (Harvard University Press, 2014), which was awarded the Fraenkel Prize, and the editor of 'Islam and the European Empires' (Oxford University Press, 2014). He regularly writes on history and current affairs for newspapers and magazines; his essays and reviews have appeared in The New York Times, The Times Literary Supplement, and The London Review of Books, among others.
5:30pm
Stiteler Hall B21, 208 South 37th Street
Apr
13
Dr. Brian Spooner, University of Pennsylvania Brian Spooner, Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, will focus on how Iran became one of the states of the Modern Middle East, how it differs from the rest of the Islamic world, why it had a revolution when it did, and how the post-revolutionary regime is changing. “Iran’s Place in the Modern World,” is a part of a lecture series called Iran, The Middle East and ISIS, that addresses the continuing crisis in the Middle East by explaining its historical origins and examining regional attitudes of the United States, as well as focusing on the challenges posed by Iran and the terrorist group ISIS. Visiting scholars will evaluate potential threats to America and the world along with considering prospects for the future. Because of the rapidly changing conditions in the Middle East the lecture topics are subject to change. All Six lectures are free and open to the public and will be on the Blackwood Campus of Camden County College. For more information on the lecture series click here. The event was organized in partnership with the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility (CCLR) at Camden County College. CCLR focuses on the needs and interests of educators and the community at large. Its goal is to create an informed citizenry through exploration of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and issues critical to a democratic society. Citizens have the opportunity to meet scholars, scientists, government officials and business leaders to explore historical and current issues and discuss societal problems and their solutions. Learn more about CCLR here.
7:00pm
Civic Hall, the Connector Building, Blackwood Campus, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Apr
20
Dr. Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, University of Pennsyvania Firoozeh Kashani-Sabet, Professor of History University of PennsylvaniaRevolution, war and politics have transformed the ways in which Iranian women have grappled with questions of empowerment, inclusion and identity.  Through a discussion of popular culture in post-revolutionary Iran, this talk will address the seeming contradictions and challenges in the lives of contemporary Iranian women. “A Contradiction in Terms?: Women, Politics, and Revolution in Iran,” is a part of a lecture series called Iran, The Middle East and ISIS, that addresses the continuing crisis in the Middle East by explaining its historical origins and examining regional attitudes of the United States, as well as focusing on the challenges posed by Iran and the terrorist group ISIS. Visiting scholars will evaluate potential threats to America and the world along with considering prospects for the future. Because of the rapidly changing conditions in the Middle East the lecture topics are subject to change. All Six lectures are free and open to the public and will be on the Blackwood Campus of Camden County College. For more information on the lecture series click here. The event was organized in partnership with the Center for Civic Leadership and Responsibility (CCLR) at Camden County College. CCLR focuses on the needs and interests of educators and the community at large. Its goal is to create an informed citizenry through exploration of humanities, social sciences, natural sciences and issues critical to a democratic society. Citizens have the opportunity to meet scholars, scientists, government officials and business leaders to explore historical and current issues and discuss societal problems and their solutions. Learn more about CCLR here.
7:00pm
Civic Hall, the Connector Building, Blackwood Campus, Blackwood, NJ 08012
Jun
20
Abeer Aloush (UPENN) About the Workshop: Current reading devices allow multiple readers to read the same text together, annotate the text, and share their annotations. The resulting practice is referred to as social reading. This new literacy practice violates many readers expectations of what it means to read based on a shared print culture (Baron, 2013). This presentation frames social reading in terms of a new participatory culture (Jenkins, 2009) in which interpretive practices long associated with the individual become a collaborative, group activity. The impact of social reading has stirred much academic controversy. In this workshop, Arabic instructors will discuss how to expand the vocabulary of new learners and build a thread of reading based on natural visual interpretation. Students can produce intensively Arabic threads in a minimal time to practice the language. The workshop will show different models of using meta-reading at a variety of levels: Elementary and Intermediate; Some digital examples will be shared as well. About the Presenter: Abeer Aloush has a PhD from SUNY, The University at Albany; her degree is informed by the interdisciplinary field of Culture Studies, Comparative Literature and Linguistics. She specializes in the identity struggle of minorities in France and Egypt and she is interested in analyzing different phenomena related to integration, multiculturalism, citizenship, alterity, bilingualism, duality and identity struggle. She is also interested in the sociolinguistics to explain the phenomenon of Franco-Arab hip-hop of the second generation to parent Muslim immigrants as acoustically violent affirmation of visibility. Dr. Aloush is a formal scholar at Oxford Brooks University where she attended two years ago a field research to study the problematic conditions of Muslim immigrants in the French slums. Also, she has a Post-graduate degree in Digital Humanities from University of Victoria, British Columbia with specialty on Teaching Second Language through Games and Digital Curation. Also, Dr. Aloush has a Certificate from University of Pennsylvania in Instruction through Technology and Online Teaching and she has an MA in Translation from Cairo University. She has an extensive experience in teaching Arabic through applying new teaching methodologies and technology. Before University of Pennsylvania, she used to work at Columbia University and NYU. She teaches since six years all levels of Arabic at University of Pennsylvania (from elementary to advanced) and teaches Media and Reading in Social Sciences courses as well. Also, she established teaching Arabic online at Penn since 2012 where she receives students from other universities as well. She designed and developed the online teaching by creating a virtual environment of learning in the purpose of excelling in Arabic. Since 2010 and to present, she is serving as a representative of the Critical Language Scholarship for the area of New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania and a reader/juror for the committee of selection. She represents CLS in all the critical languages (i.e. Arabic, Chinese, Pashtu, Japanese, Farsi, Panjabi, Urdu, Bengali, Indonesian, Azerbaijani, Hindi and Russian). Since 2013, Dr. Aloush is an OPI evaluator of FLAS and the Arabic Lead of Fulbright Foreign Teaching Language Assistants. She is certified for Teaching Languages for Purposes by the National Language Center located at University of Hawaii through the project she designed for Law students called "Legal Arabic for Courts and Ethics".  She works on NA (Needs analysis) to offer Arabic for different purposes such as law, medical, IT, banking, and so forth. She offers continuously monthly workshops and talks to train other instructors at University of Pennsylvania  and other universities on teaching through the use of technology, teaching online and Digital Humanities. She represents University of Pennsylvania in national and international conferences to share new applied methodologies in teaching Arabic. Her last project is entitled “Multicultural and Interactive Arabic  Digital Edutainment.” The envisaged project provides a schematic overview of alternatives to edutainment for learning the Arabic language. The project will expand the experience of personal growth through requiring conscious reflection on language by trying to push the boundaries of digital gaming.  It will expand to other language as a second phase to train learners on Hebrew, Persian, Old Turkish (Ottoman).
1:00pm
Fisher - Bennett Hall, Room TBA, 3340 Walnut Street Philadelphia PA, 19104