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Isidore of Seville and a Copyist, from Etymologies
France (southern Fr?), c.1250 (Schoenberg MS ljs184, f.1r)

                                                                                  Medieval Events

 

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                                                                                          Fall 2015

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, September 9, 2015 - 5:00pm to 9:00pm

Van Pelt Library, 6th Floor

 

Med/Ren Welcome Back Reception with a Roundtable on “Periodization and the Premodern”

 

 

 

 

Wednesday, October 7th, 5pm

Van Pelt Library, Class of ’78 Pavilion 

 

Sara Lipton, Professor of History, State University of New York at Stony Brook

“What’s in a Nose?  On the Origins, Dissemination, and Effects of Medieval Anti-Jewish Caricature”

Wine and cheese reception to follow talk

In this paper I examine the visual sources for the earliest anti-Jewish caricatures, the contexts in which they first appeared, and the means by which they gradually came to shape medieval Christian -- and eventually modern European -- perceptions of and attitudes toward Jews.  I argue that art had an under-appreciated place in the development of western anti-Semitism.

From Sara Lipton's website:

My work focuses on religious identity and experience, Jewish-Christian relations, and art and culture in the high and later Middle Ages (11th–15th centuries). I am interested in the relationship between formal knowledge and lived experience, particularly as manifested in the interplay of text and image, and as mediated through the figure of the Jew. I recently completed a book called Dark Mirror: The Medieval Origins of Anti-Semitic Iconography (Metropolitan Books, 2014). Dark Mirror examines how changes in Christian devotion, thought, and politics affected the visual representation of the Jew. It explains the emergence of the iconographically identifiable Jew around the year 1080 and brings theoretical coherence to the dizzying proliferation of images of Jews in subsequent centuries. My current project, "The Vulgate of Experience: Art and Preaching in the High Middle Ages (1180–1300)," explores why and to what effect Christendom invested so much in worshiping the ineffable Word through the material thing.

Organized by the faculty workshop in Medieval Studies and co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program, Art History, Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, Romance Languages, and the Center for Ancient Studies.

 

 

 

 

Thursday, October 15th, 4:30-6:00PM  

Fisher-Bennett Hall, room 401

Lecture by Professor Susan Crane, Columbia University

 

Wednesday, Octover 21st, 5PM

English Department Grad Lounge (Fisher-Bennett Hall 330)

Dianne Mitchell, Department of English, University of Pennsylvania

 

 

Wednesday, October 28th, 5pm

Van Pelt Library, Class of ’78 Pavilion 

 

Julian Weiss, Professor of Medieval and Early Modern Spanish, King’s College London

"Josephus in Early Modern Spain: 1492 and the Death and Life of Jews"

 

On March 27, 1492, a few days before the Edict that expelled the Jews from Spain, the royal chronicler Alfonso de Palencia (1423-1492) published his Castilian translations of two works by the famous Jewish historian Flavius Josephus, The Jewish War and Against Apion Palencia’s volume, Guerra judaica con los libros contra Appion, thus exemplifies the tension between two facets of Josephus’s writing:  his fierce critique of Jewish sectarianism and stubborn resistance to Imperial order and his eloquent defence of their enduring religious and cultural traditions. This paper explores the cultural and political significance of these Spanish translations in the light of the events leading up to 1492 and it considers whether Palencia appropriated this Romanized Jewish historian in order to open up a space for religious minorities in the new imperial order ushered in by the Catholic Monarchs. Besides reading Palencia’s translations against other contemporary texts by and about Jews and conversos, I focus upon a famous episode of Jewish ‘cannibalism’; consider the marginalia of sixteenth-century readers found in extant copies of the 1492 edition; and speculate on the implications of later Spanish versions for Sephardic identity in exile.

 

Organized by the faculty workshop in Medieval Studies and co-sponsored by the Jewish Studies Program, Art History, Classical Studies, Comparative Literature, Romance Languages, and the Center for Ancient Studies.