Charles Brian Rose

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James B. Pritchard Professor of Archaeology
Curator-in-Charge, Mediterranean Section, University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology
President, Archaeological Institute of America
Contact Information
Office Address: 
Mediterranean Section, University Museum
Phone: 
(215) 898-4071
Email Address: 
roseb@sas.upenn.edu
Education: 

Ph.D. (Art History and Archaeology) Columbia University, 1987
M.A. (Art History and Archaeology) Columbia University, 1980
B.A. (Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology) Haverford College, 1978

Summary of Interests: 
Mediterranean archaeology
Roman art
Selected Publications: 

Dynastic Commemoration and Imperial Portraiture in the Julio-Claudian Period (1997).

English-language editor, Studia Troica, the annual journal of the Troy excavations.

Work in Progress: 

final publication of the architecture and architectural decoration of the Roman houses at Troy

Recent Courses: 
  • Roman Topography,
  • the Archaeology of Troy,
  • Augustan Rome,
  • Roman Republican sculpture, architecture, and coinage

Simon Richter

[image of Prof. Richter]
Professor of German
Contact Information
Office Address: 
743 Williams Hall
Phone: 
215-898-8606
Email Address: 
srichter@sas.upenn.edu
Office Hours: 
on leave Fall 2011 and Spring 2012

Simon Richter is Professor of Germanic Languages and Literatures and member of the Graduate Groups in Comparative Literature and Religious Studies and affiliated with the Programs in Cinema Studies and Women’s Studies.

Summary of Interests: 
18th-century literature
gender studies
the body
Selected Publications: 

Missing the Breast: Gender, Fantasy and the Body in the German Enlightenment

Laocoon's Body and the Aesthetics of Pain.

Unwrapping Goethe's Weimar: Essays in Cultural Studies and Local Knowledge (co-edited with Susanne Kord and Burkhard Henke), 1999.

The Literature of Weimar Classicism, volume seven of the Camden House History of German Literature (2005).

He has published articles in the areas of history of medicine, gay and lesbian studies, aesthetics, opera and literature, the process of digestion, German foodways, cinema studies, cultural studies and on authors such as Sophie von La Roche, Theresa Huber, Winckelmann, Lessing, Heinse, Eichendorff, Hegel, Max Frisch, Goethe, Moritz, Büchner, Schiller, Habermas, and Sophie Mereau.

Recent Courses: 
  • GRMN 001, “Water Worlds: From Noah to New Orleans,”
  • GRMN 257, "Nazi Cinema,"
  • GRMN 256, "The Devil's Pact in Literature, Music & Film,"
  • GRMN 550: “The German Connection: Hollywood and Berlin,
  • GRMN 630: “Religion, Literature, and the Bible in the German Enlightenment.”

Ann Kuttner

[image of Prof. Kuttner]
Associate Professor
Contact Information
Office Address: 
210 Jaffe Building
Phone: 
215-898-0897
Email Address: 
akuttner@sas.upenn.edu
Education: 

Ph.D. (1987) from the Group in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology at the University of California, Berkeley.
B.A. (1978) in Classical and Near Eastern Archaeology from Bryn Mawr College.

Summary of Interests: 
Hellenistic, Roman
Late Antique
Material culture
Recent Courses: 
  • Greek Art and Architecture (ARTH 220)
  • Hellenistic and Roman Art and Architecture (ARTH 221)
  • Roman Houses, Villas, and Palaces (ARTH 421)
  • The Age of Augustus (ARTH 421)
  • Undergraduate Seminar: ‘Classical’ Mythology & the Western Tradition (ARTH 301)
  • Proseminar: Self, Society and History: Roman Commemorative Art and Architecture
  • Seminar: Pergamon and Rome
  • Seminar:  Borderlines—Cultural competition and convergence in Hellenistic and Roman North Africa, Egypt, Anatolia and the Middle East
  • Seminar: Using Somebody Else's Story: Problems in Hellenistic and Roman Mythological Art
  • Seminar: Late Antique Art

Campbell Grey

[image of Prof. Grey]
Assistant Professor of Classical Studies
Contact Information
Office Address: 
262 Cohen Hall
Phone: 
(215) 898-6941
Email Address: 
cgrey@sas.upenn.edu
Education: 

Ph.D. (Classics), St John's College, Cambridge (2002)
M.Phil. (Ancient History), University of Sydney (1997)
B.A. (Ancient History and Archaeology), University of Auckland (1994)

Summary of Interests: 
Roman history
People & their environments
Marginal populations
Selected Publications: 

Constructing Communities in the Late Roman Countryside, Cambridge University Press (2011).

"Slavery in the Late Roman World", in K. Bradley and P. Cartledge, eds., The Cambridge World History of Slavery: The Ancient Mediterranean World, Cambridge University Press (2011), 482–509.

"Civil War? What Civil War? Usurpers in the Historia Augusta", in C. Damon, B. Breed and A. Rossi, eds., Citizens of Discord: Rome and its Civil Wars, Oxford University Press (2010), 87–101.

"Contextualizing Colonatus: The Origo of the Late Roman Empire," JRS 97 (2007) 155-175.

Work in Progress: 

"Modeling Mobility: Wall Stones as Proxies for Movement around a Roman Landscape in Tuscany", (co-authored with J. Mathieu, A. Arnoldus-Huyzendfeld, A. Pattachini, and M. Ghisleni).

Recent Courses: 

(Undergraduate) Ancient Rome; Structures of the Roman Empire; Disasters in the Ancient Mediterranean World

(Graduate) Problems in Roman History; Roman Law; Ancient Economies

Karen Detlefsen

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Associate Professor of Philosophy and Education
Contact Information
Office Address: 
466 Cohen Hall
Phone: 
(215) 898-5560
Email Address: 
detlefse@phil.upenn.edu
Office Hours: 
On leave 2011-12
Summary of Interests: 
Early Modern Philosophy
Philosophy of Biology
Women in Philosophy
Selected Publications: 

“Explanation and Demonstration in the Wolff-Haller Debate Surrounding Generation.” In The Problem of Generation in Early Modern Philosophy: From Descartes to Kant, edited by Justin Smith. Series: Cambridge Studies in Philosophy and Biology (2006).

“Atomism, Monism, and Causation in Margaret Cavendish's Natural Philosophy.” Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy. Vol. 3, 2005.

“Supernaturalism, Occasionalism, and Preformation in Malebranche.” Perspectives on Science, 11 (4), Winter 2003, pp. 443-483.

“Diversity and the Individual in Dewey's Philosophy of Democratic Education.'' Educational Theory, 48 (3), Summer 1998, pp. 309-329

Work in Progress: 

I am currently working on a project on the relation between the life sciences and metaphysics in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Specifically, I am tracing the evolution of the concepts of mechanism, teleology, individuation, and laws in the metaphysics of Descartes, Malebranche, Leibniz, Albrecht von Haller, and Caspar Friedrich Wolff as each tries to explain the generation of new organisms. I am also working on a number of papers on early modern women philosophers, including Margaret Cavendish, Anne Conway, Mary Astell, and Émilie Du Châtelet.

Rita Copeland

[image of Prof. Copelandt]
Sheli Z. and Burton X. Rosenberg Professor of Humanities
Contact Information
Office Address: 
720 Williams Hall
Phone: 
(215) 898-6836
Email Address: 
rcopelan@sas.upenn.edu
Education: 

Ph.D. (Comparative Literature) University of California, Berkeley
M.A. (Comparative Literature), University of California, Berkeley
B.A. (Comparative Literature), University of California, Berkeley

Summary of Interests: 
Medieval literataure
Literary theory
History of rhetoric
Selected Publications: 

The Cambridge Companion to Allegory, ed. with Peter Struck (2010).

Medieval Grammar and Rhetoric: The Language Arts and Literary Theory, AD 300 to 1475, ed. with Ineke Sluiter (2009).

Pedagogy, Intellectuals, and Dissent in the Later Middle Ages: Lollardy and Ideas of Learning (2001).

Criticism and Dissent in the Middle Ages (1996).

Rhetoric, Hermeneutics, and Translation in the Middle Ages: Academic Traditions and Vernacular Texts (1991; rpt. 1995).

See also the information at: New Medieval Literatures.

Work in Progress: 

Currently I am working on representations of the intellectual in pre-modern Europe, from late antique rhetorical culture to late medieval university cultures and
heretical communities.

Recent Courses: 

(undergraduate) History of Literary Theory (Ancient to Modern); Ancient and Medieval Epic and Romance; Prison Narratives from Ancient to Modern.
(graduate) Chaucer's Classicisms; Piers Plowman; Introduction to Literary Theory Medieval Education; Premodern Rhetorics

Other Professional Activity: 

I work across a number of fields and periods, including: medieval literature (English, Latin, French); intellectuals, learning, and literacy in medieval Europe; literary theory from ancient to early modern; the history of rhetoric from ancient to early modern. Usually my teaching combines my interests in antiquity and the Middle Ages-or how the Middle Ages understood antiquity.  I am also a co-editor and co-founder of the Medieval Cultures Series (University of Minnesota Press), and co-editor and co-founder of the annual New Medieval Literatures (see information at Brepols).

Deven M. Patel

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Associate Professor
Contact Information
Office Address: 
814 Williams Hall
Phone: 
215-898-7475
Email Address: 
devenp@sas.upenn.edu

Prof. Patel teaches in the Department of South Asia Studies. His focus is on the intersection of language, literature, and culture in a south Asia.

Education: 

Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley
B.A. Columbia University

Summary of Interests: 
Sanskrit language & literature
Indian literature
Indian philosophy
Selected Publications: 
Text to Tradition: The Naiṣadhīyacarita and Literary Community in South Asia.  Columbia University Press, 2014.   
 
Interview with Critical Margins:

Āndhraśabdacintāmaṇi: A Grammar of Telugu Language in Sanskrit [co-authored with R.V.S. Sundaram], Central Institute of Indian Languages, 2016. 
 
Kavirājamārgam: The Way of the King of Poets  [co-authored with R.V.S. Sundaram], Jawarharlal Nehru University (Kannada Language Chair) and Manohar Publishers, 2017.  
 
Recent Courses: 
  • SAST 004 401India's Literature: Love, War, Wisdom and Humor
  • SAST 006 401Hindu Mythology
  • SAST 150 401Introduction To Indian Philosophy
  • SAST 324 401Sanskrit Literature and Poetry
  • SAST 334 401A Survey of Sanskrit, Pakrit,& Classical Tamil Literature in Translation
  • SAST 713 401Literary Theory, Aesthetics, and Comparative Literature in South Asia
  • SKRT 460 001Sanskrit: 1st Year
  • SAST 480 301Readings in Sanskrit Literature

Heather Sharkey

[image of Prof. Sharkey]
Associate Professor
Contact Information
Office Address: 
835 Williams Hall
Phone: 
215-746-0176
Email Address: 
hsharkey@sas.upenn.edu

Heather J. Sharkey is a historian in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.

Education: 

Ph.D., Princeton University
M.Phil., University of Durham in England
B.A., Yale University

Summary of Interests: 
Islamic world
modern Middle East
Muslim, Christian, Jewish rela
Selected Publications: 

Living with Colonialism: Nationalism and Culture in the Anglo-Egyptian Sudan (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2003).

American Evangelicals in Egypt: Missionary Encounters in an Age of Empire (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008).

American Missionaries and the Middle East: Foundational Encounters, eds. Mehmet Ali Doğan and Heather J. Sharkey (Salt Lake City: University of Utah Press, 2011).

Unexpected Consequences of Christian Missions in the Middle East, Africa, and South Asia, ed. Heather J. Sharkey (Syracuse: Syracuse University Press, forthcoming).

For further publications, see CV publications page.

Work in Progress: 

Identity and Community in the Modern Middle East, in preparation for Cambridge University Press.

Recent Courses: 
  • Introduction to the Middle East
  • The People of Modern Egypt
  • North Africa: History, Culture, Society
  • Nationalism and Communal Identity in the Middle East
  • Muslim, Christian and Jewish Relations in the Middle East
  • Iraq, Eqypt, Algeria: Case Studies From the Arab World
  • The Middle East through Many Lenses
  • Migration and the Middle East
  • Food in the Islamic Middle East: History, Memory, Identity

Joseph E. Lowry

[image of Joseph Lowry]
Associate Professor
Contact Information
Office Address: 
837 Williams Hall
Phone: 
215-898-7469
Email Address: 
elowry@sas.upenn.edu

Joseph Lowry is an Associate Professor in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations.

Summary of Interests: 
Islamic law
Arabic literature
classical Islamic thought
Recent Courses: 
  • Intro to the Qur'an (NELC 130)
  • Intro to Islamic Law (NELC 238)
  • Islamic Intellectual Tradition (NELC 437)
  • Approaches to Islamic Law (NELC 638)
  • Intro to Reading the Qur'an in Arabic (ARAB 333)
  • Intro to Classical Islamic Texts (ARAB 436)
Brief Biography: 

Joseph Lowry is a specialist in Islamic law, Arabic literature, and classical Islamic thought. He is the author, among other works, of Early Islamic Legal Theory: the Risala of Muhammad Ibn Idris al-Shafi'i (E. J. Brill, 2007) and the editor (with D. Stewart and S. Toorawa) of Law and Education in Medieval Islam: Studies in Memory of George Makdisi (E. J. W. Gibb Memorial Trust, 2005) and (with D. Stewart) of Essays in Arabic Literary Biography II: 1350-1850 (Harrasowitz, 2009).

Dan Ben-Amos

[image of Prof. Ben-Amos]
Professor of Folklore and Asian and Middle Eastern Studies
Contact Information
Office Address: 
835 Williams Hall
Phone: 
(215) 898-5857
Email Address: 
dbamos@sas.upenn.edu

Dan Ben-Amos is a specialist in folklore and folklife, trained in the comparativist tradition in Jerusalem and at Indiana University at Bloomington. He is the editor of a series of translations of folklore classics, primarily by European scholars. He has published many articles on folklore theory and the history of the field.

Education: 

Ph.D., 1967, Indiana University
M.A., 1964, Indiana University, M.A.
B.A., 1961, Hebrew University of Jerusalem. B.A.

Summary of Interests: 
Jewish folklore
African folklore
Prose Narrative
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