Frontiers

Frontiers - Nature

  • January 2016

    Honing Their Research (Video)

    From heart valves to vapor deposition, Sharika Bamezai, C'18, and Eric Chen, C'18, ENG'17, present their research at the College of Arts and Sciences Undergraduate Research Poster Exhibit.

    Sharika Bamezai, C'18, discusses her research on "Hemodynamic Forces Regulate Heart Valve Development."



    Eric Chen, C'18, ENG'17, discusses his research on "Designing Tools for Physical Chemistry Research."

  • December 2015

    Holiday Shopping: Beyond Eeny, Meeny, Miney, Mo

    Sudeep Bhatia, assistant professor of psychology, studies how we make decisions—for better or worse.

    Cruiser bike or mountain bike? Red sweater or blue? At this time of year, many of us are deciding what to get that special someone. Sudeep Bhatia, an assistant professor of psychology, is investigating how your mind makes that choice—and how it can sometimes be fooled.

  • November 2015

    A More Efficient Memory (Video)

    VIPER scholar David Lim, C’16, E’16, is looking for ways to make computers work better.

    Each year, Penn Arts and Sciences undergraduates get a chance to talk about their research at the School’s Undergraduate Research Fair during Family Weekend. We asked David Lim, C’16, E’16, a student in the Vagelos Integrated Program in Energy Research (VIPER), about his work with Professor of Chemistry and VIPER Co-Faculty Director Andrew Rappe.

  • November 2015

    Watch and Learn (Video)

    Penn physics demonstration videos inspire classroom curiosity.

    Physics concepts come to life in a new series of videos released by the Department of Physics and Astronomy and Penn Online Learning. The collection covers a range of topics and includes both narrated and silent versions so teachers both inside and outside Penn can use them as an educational tool.

  • September 2015

    Stress Reduction for Plants

    Ruby O’Lexy, biology graduate student, is studying how plants deal with agricultural stresses like heavy metal toxicity.

    What happens when a plant is under stress? Plenty, it turns out. Ruby O’Lexy, a doctoral student in biology at Penn Arts and Sciences, is examining the ways plant cells communicate, and her research may help feed the world someday.

  • August 2015

    Hunting for Planets

    Assistant Professor of Physics and Astronomy Cullen Blake discusses the Pluto flyby and "Earth's twin."

    In July, NASA’s New Horizons space probe captured dazzling images of the dwarf planet Pluto and its moons during a 31,000-mile-per-hour flyby. Surprising even some experts, the pictures revealed a vast variety of geologic features from frozen plains to streams. In the scientific community these photographs are provoking as many questions as they are answering.

  • July 2015

    The Science of Rejuvenation

    Dee Luo, C'16, pushes the limits of personalized medicine.

    Each summer, Penn Arts and Sciences students pursue internships that often pave the way to their future career. To provide a unique perspective, we invited Dee Luo, a senior majoring in the Biological Basis of Behavior Program and minoring in Healthcare Management, to share her experience.

  • June 2015

    Big Data

    Patricia M. Williams Term Professor in Biology Junhyong Kim navigates the complex computations of single-cell genomics.

    While most scientists spend their time trying to accumulate as much data as possible, Junhyong Kim has the opposite problem—too much data to manage.

  • May 2015

    Industrial Complex

    Penn undergraduate named 2015 Society of Chemical Industry Scholar.

    This summer Alan Dai, a junior in the Vagelos Integrated Program in Energy Research (VIPER) will scale up his research experience to the industrial level. As the recently named Dupont Society of Chemical Industry Scholar, Dai will spend ten weeks at Dupont in Newark, Delaware learning to improve the manufacturing process of agricultural materials.

  • April 2015

    60-Second Lecture: The Origin of the Elements (Video)

    Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy Masao Sako takes us way back.

    Next time you take a sip from your water bottle, you might want to consider the fact that you are ingesting 14-billion-year-old molecules. It’s just one revelation from Associate Professor of Physics and Astronomy Masao Sako’s 60-Second Lecture Series entry The Origin of the Elements.