Frontiers

Frontiers - Nature

  • April 2004

    Bird’s-Eye View of the Amazon Airborne Archaeologist Challenges the Myth of a Pristine Wilderness

    In the office of a typical archaeologist, you would expect to find things like stone tools, pottery fragments, and maybe even a few Wooly Mammoth bones. But Clark Erickson is no typical archaeologist. Oversize rolls of aerial photographs are stacked into tubular pyramids on a desk and worktable in his University Museum office.

  • April 2003

    Celestial Fossils Found

    Penn researchers discover of three of the faintest and smallest objects ever detected beyond Neptune.

    When we think of our solar system, we normally picture the Sun ringed round by nine planets and assorted moons, comets, and asteroids. It wasn't until 1992 that astronomers started to discover planetesimals, giant ice-crusted rocks adrift just beyond Neptune in a region known as the Kuiper Belt.

  • April 2003

    La Difference

    Smaller portions may explain the “French paradox" of rich foods and a svelte population.

    Just 7 percent of French adults are overweight, as compared with 22 percent of Americans, and proportionally far fewer people die of heart disease in France. For more than a decade, American dieters and scientists have wondered--not with a little envy--how the French get away with eating rich sauces, buttery croissants, and creamy cheeses and still remain thinner and healthier.