Frontiers

Frontiers - Society

  • December 2008

    Doctors Without Modems?

    Technology Historian Nathan Ensmenger checks the pulse of the e-health revolution.

    From shopping and bill-paying to media consumption and socializing, Americans engage in dozens of routinized, Internet-mediated activities every day. And while the wired world may still skew young, Internet usage is becoming steadily more prevalent across all demographic lines.

  • December 2008

    Plugging the Pipeline

    Graduate student Arielle Kuperberg explores the impact of motherhood on graduate education for women.

    As if graduate school wasn’t hard enough, more and more women are juggling post-baccalaureate study with taking care of kids. That’s the finding of Ph.D.

  • November 2008

    What Just Happened?

    Making Sense of the 2008 Presidential Election in Real Time

    On November 5, 2008, faculty members from the Department of Political Science participated in a lively, open discussion of the historical results — and significance — of the 2008 Presidential election.

    This interactive video presentation of the event features panelists’ introductory remarks and their answers to some audience questions.

    Panelists:

  • October 2008

    The Spirit of Collegiality

    Sociologist Melissa Wilde offers a new explanation for the revolutionary transformation of the Roman Catholic Church.

    Many Catholics believe that continuity and change come to their church t

  • October 2008

    An Uncertain Revolution

    Sociologist Jason Schnittker's new study shows that the rise of a genetic model of mental illness has not increased tolerance.

    New research by Associate Professor of

  • October 2008

    A Crisis of Malnutrition

    Undergraduate Lavanya Madhusudan explores the connection between malnutrition and women’s welfare in India.

    In a class on health policy in South Asia, Health and Societies major Lavanya Madhusudan, C’09, was singularly affected by a documentary about the malnutrition of females in India. The film described the plight of girls from a village near the city of Bangalore, where Madhusudan was born.

  • September 2008

    Election Q&A with Don Kettl

    Political scientist Don Kettl answers questions about the candidates' experience and the challenges they face.

    Don Kettl, the Robert

  • September 2008

    Optimism and Paranoia

    PIK Professor John Jackson talks about the new reality of race in America.

    In his new book, Racial Paranoia: The Unintended Consequences of Political Correctness, Richard Perry University Associate Professor of Communication and Anthropology John L.

  • August 2008

    Luxurious Citizens

    Graduate student Jo Cohen studies the relationship between consumption and citizenship in 19th-century America.

    From “buy American” campaigns to appeals in Chevrolet ads to “refuel Ame

  • August 2008

    Dangerous Passage

    Undergraduate Kojo Minta explores the forces behind human trafficking in Africa.

    Last year, thousands of illegal immigrants from Africa attempted to enter