Summer Courses





People and Power in Modern Mexico

Term: 
Summer 2013
Online: 
No
Subject Area: 
HISTORY (HIST)
Course Number: 
HIST 233 910
Schedule: 
Tuesday 5:30pm-8:40pm
Schedule: 
Thursday 5:30pm-8:40pm
Day(s): 
Tuesday
Day(s): 
Thursday
Instructor: 

GILLINGHAM, PAUL JAMES

Primary Program: 
School of Arts and Sciences
Course Description: 

This seminar introduces the history of revolution and authoritarianism in Mexico from c.1880 – c.2000. It applies multidisciplinary approaches to primary sources ranging from cartoons to declassified intelligence to consider the relationships between people and power, investigating the three central questions of modern Mexican history: Why was there a major social revolution? How did that popular revolution mutate into a successful authoritarian state? And how did Mexicans with profound experience of mass mobilization coexist with that authoritarianism, and with the skewed economy it oversaw? In debating these questions the course aims not just to trace the course of modern Mexican social, cultural and political history, but also to think about a more general problem: Why people rebel, and why they do not rebel.

Syllabus: 

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