Events

Jul
18

6:00 pm
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Jane Dmochowski Remote Sensing: The Earth's Increasingly Helpful PhysicianPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

In 1858, by combining the inventions of the camera and the hot air balloon, French photographer and balloonist Gaspar Felix Tournachon revealed the world from a perspective never seen before by the human eye: from up above. As airplanes and satellites took to the skies, and photographic technology improved rapidly during the last century and a half, the black-and-white photos of the early days evolved into the detailed, beautiful, and informative microwave, multispectral, and hyperspectral “remote sensing” images of today.

Dmochowski will talk about how these images can act as the Earth’s “physician,” indicating what the planet’s health is today by detecting oil spills, determining soil-moisture content, monitoring vegetation growth, observing ocean circulation, and much more.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Aug
15

6:00 pm
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James Aguirre Watching the Hidden Evolution of GalaxiesPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

The galaxies seen in the universe today are the result of a long process of formation and evolution. It is a remarkable fact that by using the finite speed of light, one can view galaxies as they were in the past, and the very expansion of the universe provides a way to measure the distance to them, together providing 3-D snapshots of galaxies changing over time. The most detailed and comprehensive picture of the universe comes from visible light, but much of the story of galaxy formation is only available if we are able to look at infrared and radio wavelengths. Aguirre will discuss his work on new instruments to view this heretofore invisible process and how it is linked to the larger evolution of the universe.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Sep
12

6:00 pm
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Dustin Brisson Re-Invasion of Lyme Disease in the Northeastern United StatesPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Lyme disease appears to have re-emerged in the late 1900s after hundreds of years of near-complete absence. In this talk, Dustin Brisson will share his research exploring how and why Lyme disease has recently and rapidly returned to be the most prevalent vector-borne disease in North America.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Sep
26

6:00 pm
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Marie Gottschalk Dismantling the Carceral State: Law, Order, and Criminal Justice Reform in the Age of TrumpPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Marie Gottschalk studies the origins and politics of mass incarceration, focusing on the idea of a “carceral state” with millions of people who are in prison, on probation, or on parole.

Gottschalk specializes in American politics, criminal justice, health policy, race, the development of the welfare state, and business-labor relations. She was one of the 30 academics, historians, activists, and politicians included in Ana DuVernay’s 13th, a Netflix documentary about mass incarceration that refers to the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery but left an exploitable loophole: “except as punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.”

She’s the author of Caught: The Prison State and the Lockdown of American Politics and The Prison and the Gallows: The Politics of Mass Incarceration in America, which won the 2007 Ellis W. Hawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Oct
24

6:00 pm
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Camille Charles The Real Record on Racial AttitudesPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Issues of race and racial division have been prominent features of social organization and culture in the United States from as far back as the historical record goes. As a leading scholar in American race relations, Charles maps the major divisions of, and trends in, U.S. racial attitudes and documents both significant progressive changes as well as substantial enduring frictions and conflicts that continue to make race such a fraught terrain. She will tackle the conceptually broad and analytically powerful record, which is a strong caution against glib generalities that attempt to reduce an enormously multifaceted social phenomenon to simplistic catch phrases like "racist America," "the end of racism" or, more recently, "post-racial America."

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Nov
14

6:00 pm
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Fatemeh Shams Where Is "Home"? Displacement and Exile in Persian Literary TraditionPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Although terms such as "displacement" and "exile" have been more recurrent in the wake of the ongoing refugee crisis across the world, the constant search of "home" has been always present in various literary traditions, including Persian literature. In this talk, Shams will explore various meanings and representations of "home" throughout the classical and modern literary traditions in an attempt to understand the notion of "exile" and "displacement" as a mental and physical mode of existence.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Dec
5

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Masao Sako Unseen Objects in Our Solar SystemPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Masao Sako will discuss his research on searching for new objects in the solar system. He will describe efforts to discover objects beyond the orbit of Neptune, some of which contain valuable information about the complicated dynamical history of the system. Dr. Sako will also discuss why astronomers think that there is a massive previously-unseen planet out there, called Planet Nine, and how it might be found.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe