Events

Mar
30

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
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David Yokum Goldstone Forum: Tales of Psychological Science from City Hall to Oval Office Claudia Cohen Hall, Terrace Room, 249 South 36th Street

There is currently a unique attempt, emerging from within government itself, to integrate the insights and experimental methods from the psychological sciences directly into day-to-day governance. David Yokum, a founding fellow of President Obama’s Social and Behavioral Sciences Team, will talk about the latest work emerging from the front lines, most notably a new initiative, The Lab @ DC, from the District of Columbia Government. As part of exploring the unique roles that social scientists can play in experiment-based policy-making, he’ll touch on examples ranging from a randomized controlled trial of police body-worn cameras to a “form-a-palooza” that aims to systematically improve every government form based on psychological insights. He will also describe a novel effort underway to integrate open science principles and political process.

About the Speaker

David Yokum, J.D., Ph.D. is director of The Lab @ DC in the Executive Office of the Mayor of the District of Columbia Government. David was previously a founding member of the White House’s Social and Behavioral Sciences Team and director of its scientific delivery unit, housed at the U.S. General Services Administration. David’s expertise draws on the cognitive foundations of judgment and decision-making and, in particular, how that knowledge and associated methodologies can be extended into applied settings. His work has been published in journals such as Health Affairs and the Journal of Empirical Legal Studies and received media coverage from outlets such as NPR, The New York Times, and The Wall Street Journal. David earned a Ph.D. in psychology at the University of Arizona (UA), a law degree from the UA James E. Rogers College of Law, a Master’s degree in bioethics and medical humanities from the University of South Florida, and a B.S. in biology from Birmingham-Southern College.



Mar
30

5:00 pm
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Rita Barnard Learning from Mandela 3401 Walnut Street, Center for Africana Studies

Nelson Mandela is one of the most revered figures of our time.  A "life-loving man” by his own description, he committed himself to a compelling political struggle, faced the death penalty, and endured a prison sentence that entailed the sacrifice of a third of his life to his cause. During these long years, he became the world’s best-known prisoner, a symbol of his own people’s demand for liberation, and a galvanizing icon for millions of all around the world who yearned for a politics of moral conviction. Mandela was never uncontroversial: some have labelled him a sell-out, others a terrorist. But the qualities of leadership he displayed are inspiring to remember in our dark times.

The Center for Africana Studies presents this brief screening and a talk on the life and legacy of humanitarian and freedom fighter, Nelson Mandela. Professor Barnard will discuss Mandela’s style and character—a leader of dignity, courage, consistency, flexibility, and magnanimity. 

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Apr
4

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Nancy Steinhardt How Chinese Architecture Became Modern, 1927-1977Penn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

From 1927, when the first group of Chinese architects trained abroad returned home, to 1977, the year Mao Zedong died, Chinese architecture transformed from buildings like the Forbidden City to a modern building system inspired by Western architecture. France, the United States, the Soviet Union, Taiwan, and Japan are all part of this story that takes place during the war-torn 1930s and 1940s, through the Soviet advisors of the 1950s and the Cultural Revolution of 1966-1976. Sun Yat-sen and Mao were central to China’s drive toward modernism in this tumultuous half-century.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe 



Apr
5

11:55 am - 12:00 pm
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Etienne Benson Caring About "the" Environment: A Very Brief History60-Second Lecture Stiteler Plaza, 37th and Locust Walk

Penn Arts and Sciences professors squeeze a wealth of knowledge into just one minute as the 60-Second Lectures return this spring. Stop by Stiteler Plaza on Wednesdays in April for quick and innovative talks on science, art, technology, and society.

Watch the livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS.

See past lectures online at www.sas.upenn.edu/60second

Rain Location: Houston Hall, Bistro

 



Apr
12

11:55 am - 12:00 pm
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Lauren Sallan Bringing Dead Fishes Back to Life60-Second Lecture College Green, Locust Walk

Penn Arts and Sciences professors squeeze a wealth of knowledge into just one minute as the 60-Second Lectures return this spring. Stop by Stiteler Plaza on Wednesdays in April for quick and innovative talks on science, art, technology, and society.

Watch the livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS.

See past lectures online at www.sas.upenn.edu/60second

Rain Location: Houston Hall, Bistro

 



Apr
19

11:55 am - 12:00 pm
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Guobin Yang Understanding the Success of China's Super App60-Second Lecture Stiteler Plaza, 37th and Locust Walk

Penn Arts and Sciences professors squeeze a wealth of knowledge into just one minute as the 60-Second Lectures return this spring. Stop by Stiteler Plaza on Wednesdays in April for quick and innovative talks on science, art, technology, and society.

Watch the livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS.

See past lectures online at www.sas.upenn.edu/60second

Rain Location: Houston Hall, Bistro



Apr
26

11:55 am - 12:00 pm
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James Aguirre Finding the First Galaxies in the Universe by Looking Where They Aren't60-Second Lecture Stiteler Plaza, 37th and Locust Walk

Penn Arts and Sciences professors squeeze a wealth of knowledge into just one minute as the 60-Second Lectures return this spring. Stop by Stiteler Plaza on Wednesdays in April for quick and innovative talks on science, art, technology, and society.

Watch the livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS.

See past lectures online at www.sas.upenn.edu/60second

Rain Location: Houston Hall, Bistro



May
5

9:00 am - 5:00 pm
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DCC Annual Conference: Citizenship on the Edge: Sex/Gender/RaceCivil Discourse at Penn Arts and Sciences Irvine Auditorium, Amado Recital Hall, 3401 Spruce Street
  • Although privileges and protections provided by the state are never entirely secure, there are those whose gender, sexual, and racial positioning give them an especially precarious hold on both the legal and symbolic rights of citizenship.  In its 2017 Annual Conference, “Citizenship on the Edge: Sex/Gender/Race,” Penn DCC examines the struggles of vulnerable groups to gain or maintain their status as full citizens, recognizing at the same time that the edge they inhabit can be a cutting edge.  Participating Scholars include Erez Aloni (Whittier Law School), Mishuana Goeman (UCLA), Samantha Majic (John Jay College of Criminal Justice), Paul Mepschen (Universiteit Van Amsterdam), Charles Mills (Northwestern University), Michael Rembis (University at Buffalo), Tracy Robinson (University of the West Indies at Mona), and Kimberly Theidon (Tufts University).

Organized by the Penn Program on Democracy, Citizenship and Constitutionalism.