Events

Jan
23

6:00 pm
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Herman Beavers Geography and the Political Imaginary in the Novels of Toni MorrisonPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Professor Beavers' talk will focus on one of the most important figures in American letters, Toni Morrison, and will be based on his forthcoming book, Geography and the Political Imaginary in the Novels of Toni Morrison. He will touch on how black men perform manhood in her novels, the spatial relations Southern migrants experience in New York City, the role black women play in the establishment of spaces of resistance, how race figures into the transition from indentured labor to paid labor and the relationship between precariousness and placemaking.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Click HERE to see a complete listing of all of the Spring 2018 Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafés.



Jan
30

6:00 pm - 7:30 pm
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Rt. Hon. David Miliband Refugees and the Political Crisis of our TimeThe Browne Center Anspach Lecture Claudia Cohen Hall, Room 17, 249 South 36th Street

David Miliband is President and Chief Executive of the International Rescue Committee (IRC), which employs 16,000 people around the world and works in 40 countries where lives and livelihoods are shattered by conflict and disaster. From 2007-2010 Miliband served as the UK’s Foreign Secretary, where he was responsible for a global network of diplomats in more than 160 countries. He established a distinctive voice for an internationalist Britain, from the war in Afghanistan to the Iranian nuclear program to engagement with the world’s emerging powers.  He has taught at MIT and Stanford University.

Questions? Contact Eileen Doherty-Sil, dohertye@sas.upenn.edu.



Feb
6

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Jonathan Heckman After the Higgs Boson: What's next for fundamental physics at the Large Hadron Collider?Penn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Professor Heckman is a theorist working at the interface of particle physics and string theory and in particular how to "connect strings to things." His work aims at addressing what is the structure of Nature at the shortest distance scales. Recently there has been much excitement about the discovery of the Higgs boson. But what is the Higgs boson and what comes next? Come learn what physicists hope to understand about fundamental particles and interactions from the Large Hadron Collider.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Click HERE to see a complete listing of all of the Spring 2018 Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafés.



Feb
20

6:00 pm
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Jennifer Houser Wegner Love Hurts: Heartbreak in the Ancient WorldPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

A Penn alumna who earned her B.A. in Egyptology from Penn of Arts and Sciences, Jennifer Houser Wegner has worked in Egypt since 1990 and has participated in fieldwork at Giza, Bersheh, Saqqara and Abydos. She is a co-author of Akhenaten, Tutankhamun and the Amarna Period: Revolution and Restoration, and most recently she co-authored The Sphinx that Traveled to Philadelphia: The Story of the Colossal Sphinx in the Penn Museum.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Click HERE to see a complete listing of all of the Spring 2018 Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafés.



Feb
23

12:30 pm - 4:30 pm
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2018 Grad Ben Talks Irvine Auditorium, Cafe 58, 3401 Spruce Street

Grad Ben Talks

Please join us for an afternoon of TED Talk-style presentations by Penn Arts and Sciences graduate students representing the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and professional master's programs.

Judges select winners in each of the four categories for a $500 cash prize.  There will also be a $500 cash prize for the overall Audience Choice Winner, selected by online votes.

The event is open to the Penn community and the general public.  And there's plenty of delicious food throughout the day!

Click HERE for more information.



Mar
13

6:00 pm
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Regina Baker Poverty in the American SouthPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

As a sociologist, Regina Baker studies inequality, social stratification and families, particularly in the South. Although poverty and uneven development exist everywhere, this part of the country has seen a disproportionate share of the nation’s socioeconomic problems. For decades, poverty there has been the highest and most persistent, and the Great Recession only made things worse. In this talk, Dr. Baker will discuss the latest findings from her research, which looks at the role of demographic, economic and racial factors that influence poverty, as well as the uncertainty of future safety nets for America's most vulnerable populations. 

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Click HERE to see a complete listing of all of the Spring 2018 Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafes. 



Mar
20

6:00 pm
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Dawn Teele Nudging Women to RunPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Dawn Teele studies the economic and psychological factors that drive women to seek political office. In a new research project, "Nudging Women to Run," Teele, along with scholars at Rutgers University, Yale University and the University of California, Berkeley, surveyed alumnae of women's campaign-training programs and is in the process of designing experimental innovations to encourage women to launch political campaigns. A leading authority on women and politics, Dr. Teele's research examines the causes and consequences of voting-rights reform, forms of bias in politics and social-science methodology. 

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Click HERE to see a complete listing of all of the Spring 2018 Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafés.



Mar
21

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
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Mugmabi Jouet American Exceptionalism: What Divides Americans From the World and From Each OtherLevin Family Dean's Forum Annenberg Center for the Performing Arts, Zellerbach Theatre, 3680 Walnut Street

Headshot

Why has modern America become so polarized? Mugambi Jouet's thought-provoking 2017 book, Exceptional America: What Divides Americans From the World and From Each Other, traces these social changes to "American exceptionalism," a storied idea that is widely misunderstood as American superiority. It has instead meant that American society is an exception compared to other nations due to unique dimensions of its history, politics, law, culture, religious beliefs, economic attitudes, and race relations. While exceptionalism once was a source of strength, it may also be an Achilles heel. Modern-day Americans are likelier than other Westerners to clash over a host of fundamental issues, from mass incarceration to universal health care, reproductive rights, climate change, and beyond.

An expert on American government, politics, and culture, Mugambi Jouet is a Thomas C. Grey Fellow at Stanford Law School. He has been interviewed by the media many times, including on National Public Radio, C-SPAN, and international outlets. A global citizen who was raised in Paris and has lived in France, Kenya, Mexico, the Netherland and the United States, Jouet has traveled extensively internationally. 

The Levin Family Dean's Forum is a celebration of the arts and sciences. Initiated in 1984, the Forum presents leading intellectual figures who exemplify the richness of the liberal arts. It also recognizes outstanding undergraduate and graduate students for their academic achievement and intellectual promise. The Levin Family Dean’s Forum is made possible by a generous gift from Stephen A. Levin, C’67, in honor of his sons Eric T. Levin, C'92, and Andrew Levin, C'14.

Free and open to the public. Doors open at 4:00 p.m. 



Apr
10

6:00 pm
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Bethany Wiggin Nikhil Anand Richard Pepino Howard Neukrug Water, Water EverywherePenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

In presentations and a panel discussion, a quartet of Penn researchers with diverse backgrounds will share their research and thoughts about water. Nikhil Anand and Bethany Wiggin will present their work on Mumbai and Philadelphia as two chapters in a global story about trade, water and empire; the creation of port infrastructure and the loss of historic wetlands; and the responses of contemporary communities to changing waters, including those rising as a result of climate change. And with the recent crisis in Flint, Michigan, as a backdrop, Richard Pepino will discuss his investigation of the risk of lead service lines contributing to childhood lead poisoning in Philadelphia. Howard Neukrug, Director of the new Water Center at Penn, will offer a brief introduction to the panel.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Click HERE to see a complete listing of all of the Spring 2018 Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafés.



May
4

9:00 am - 5:00 pm
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DCC Annual Conference: States of Religious FreedomCivil Discourse at Penn Arts and Sciences

What is religious freedom? Can it truly be universal? What are the rights of religious minorities when set against a nation's popular majority? And when religious liberties seemingly conflict with gender and sexuality rights, which should prevail if the conflict cannot be resolved?  

In its 2018 Annual Conference, The Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy will address these challenging questions and disucss how the U.S. accomodates, or hinders, religious expression, culture, and the practice of religious freedom.

This year's panelists will include: Lori G. Beaman (University of Ottawa), W. Cole Durham (Brigham Young University), R. Marie Griffith (Washington University in St. Louis), Nadia Marzouki (Harvard Kennedy School), Daniel Philpott (University of Notre Dame), and Winifred Sullivan (Indiana University at Bloomington).

Co-sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Department of Religious Studies.

For additional information, please visit www.sas.upenn.edu/dcc



Jun
12

6:00 pm
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Projit Mukharji Who Do You Think You Are? Modern Identities Between Genes and Rebirths, India c. 1950's - 1980'sPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

What makes us who we are? Is it our genes? Or is it in fact our memories? Projit Bihari Mukharji will discuss how, in newly-independent India two new sciences, genetics and parapsychology, both tried to answer this question in their distinctive ways. At the time both the disciplines were themselves also struggling to define their identities. Even as the quests for disciplinary identities were interlaced with the quest to define human identities scientifically, their political resonances with identity politics and nation-building were too obvious to ignore. As scientists, their methods and their questions moved between these various levels; scientific questions about human identity also became questions about the identity of science itself.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Click HERE to see a complete listing of all of the Spring 2018 Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafés.