Featured

Oct
31

6:00 pm
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Saul Perlmutter Stalking Dark Energy and the Mystery of the Accelerating UniverseThe Elon Musk Public Lecture Anatomy-Chemistry Building, Room 102, 3620 Hamilton Walk

The 1998 discovery that the universe's expansion is accelerating was not only unexpected, but also led to the postulation of a previously-unknown “dark energy” that forms almost three-quarters of the "stuff" of the universe. How was this discovery made? And what has been the progress since in understanding dark energy and the accelerating universe? Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor at University of California, Berkeley, will discuss these questions.



Nov
1

10:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Homecoming Weekend Events

Art History Matters

A celebration of the 20th anniversary of the naming of the Elliot and Roslyn Jaffe History of Art Building and the 55th anniversary of the History of Art Department

Art History Matters Panel Discussion

10:00 a.m. in the Rose Recital Hall, Room 419 in Fisher-Bennett Hall, 3340 Walnut Street

A panel of distinguished Penn alumni, faculty and friends will lead an interactive discussion around compelling questions such as: How can art history help us navigate our image-rich culture? Is art collecting more than an investment strategy? How many art historians does it take to change the world?

Panelists Include:
Kathy Sachs (CW’69, PAR’95)
Michael Rosenfeld (C’84)
Kimberly Michelle Brown (GR’04)
Michael J. Lewis (G’85, GR’89)
Matthew Ritchie (Practicing artist)

Penn Back Then

Saturday, November 1, 2014
Locust Walk

Alumni from all generations are invited to contribute notable Penn anecdotes and remembrances to Penn Back Then, a web-based audio scrapbook. Look for roving Penn Back Then recorders and tell them your best story. For past recordings, visit http://www.sas.upenn.edu/pennbackthen/.

For a listing of all the events and registration information click here.


Nov
1

11:00 am - 5:00 pm
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Treasures Sale and Show Penn Museum, 3260 South Street

Held to coincide with Penn Homecoming, the Treasures Sale and Show of jewelry and accessories from leading designers will also feature special lectures and tours at the museum. Treasures is organized by the Penn Museum’s volunteer Women’s Committee and proceeds support the museum's educational programs.

Penn alumna Karen Moustafellos, C’90, owner/designer of EnA Fine Jewelry, is one of this year’s presenters. EnA’s current catalogue features the Treasures Sale and Show, and 20% of all proceeds from the catalogue will benefit the Penn Museum.

See details at: http://wcpennmuseum.com/



Nov
2

11:00 am - 4:00 pm
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Treasures Sale and Show Penn Museum, 3260 South Street

Held to coincide with Penn Homecoming, the Treasures Sale and Show of jewelry and accessories from leading designers will also feature special lectures and tours at the museum. Treasures is organized by the Penn Museum’s volunteer Women’s Committee and proceeds support the museum's educational programs.

Penn alumna Karen Moustafellos, C’90, owner/designer of EnA Fine Jewelry, is one of this year’s presenters. EnA’s current catalogue features the Treasures Sale and Show, and 20% of all proceeds from the catalogue will benefit the Penn Museum.

See details at: http://wcpennmuseum.com/



Nov
11

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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James Serpell Why Did Early Humans Domesticate Wolves and Wildcats? A Novel Look at a Very Old QuestionPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.

The prevailing theory that the wild ancestors of dogs and cats gradually domesticated themselves by exploiting the ecological resources provided by early human villages relies on a number of erroneous assumptions. This talk will take a critical look at these assumptions and suggest an alternative view: That the domestication of wolves, wildcats, and many other domestic species was actually a consequence of misplaced human parental behavior.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. Contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email bryangm@pobox.upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 5–7 p.m.



Nov
18

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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Julie Ann Legate Mapping the Boundaries of Human LanguageKnowledge by the Slice Irvine Auditorium, Café 58

Human languages appear to differ tremendously. But looking past the surface cacophony, we find deep commonalities and strict limits on variation. Legate discusses the progress made towards answering the question: What is a possible human language?

Penn Arts and Sciences' Knowledge by the Slice lunchtime series offers educational talks led by insightful faculty experts. Did we mention there's pizza? So sit back, relax—and have a slice on us.

Can't make it to the lecture? Now you can watch Knowledge by the Slice live online! Visit Knowledge by the Slice Live to learn more, sign up for an email reminder, or view the lecture. You can also view past Knowledge by the Slice lectures here: www.sas.upenn.edu/slice.



Nov
20

5:30 pm
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Sherrilyn Ifill Matters of Race: Brown, Ferguson, and the Unfinished Civil Rights Agenda University of Pennsylvania Law School, 3400 Chestnut Street

The Honorable A. Leon Higginbotham Jr. Memorial Lecture

Sherrilyn Ifill is the seventh president and director-counsel of the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund, Inc. Among her successful litigation was the landmark Voting Rights Act case Houston Lawyers' Association vs. Attorney General of Texas. A critically acclaimed author, her book On the Courthouse Lawn: Confronting the Legacy of Lynching in the 21st Century reflects her lifelong engagement in and analysis of issues of race and American public life.



Dec
2

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Gwendolyn DuBois Shaw What is American Art?Penn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.

As we move toward an increasingly pluralistic society in the United States, one in which political and social parity is being achieved by greater segments of society, the idea that works of art should be discussed in separate groups based on a perception of a shared “identity” among the objects’ makers (blacks, women, queers), rather than on the works’ thematic or conceptual affinities, seems increasingly regressive. And yet, such practices persist. Prof. DuBois Shaw's talk will examine the contemporary art historical, curatorial, and critical strategies and tactics for using such markers as race, gender, sexuality, and regional identity to interpret art today.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. Contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email bryangm@pobox.upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 5–7 p.m.