Featured

Jan
28

12:00 pm
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Luka Arsenjuk “First the movement, and then what moves”: On Eisenstein’s Idea of Cinema Fisher-Bennett Hall, 330

Arsenjuk will take up the question of movement in cinema by considering the case of Sergei Eisenstein. Eisenstein’s work can be read as an attempt to develop a conception of movement capable of providing movement with unity, while at the same time allowing it to develop an astonishing plurality of its forms. It is well known, for instance, how Eisenstein exploded the limits of the parallel and alternating movement of Griffith’s montage in order to push the cinematic fiction of movement towards greater dialectical and experimental possibilities. Through Eisenstein’s films, theoretical writings, and graphic art, the talk will consider his idea of movement and what it can still tell us about cinema more generally.

Luka Arsenjuk received his B.A. from the University of Ljubljana and his Ph.D. from the Program in Literature at Duke University. His interest is in the relationship between cinema, politics, and philosophy (aesthetics and critical theory). He has published essays on Jacques Rancière’s concept of politics, cinema as mass art, Eisenstein’s idea of intellectual montage, Alexander Kluge and the filming of Marx’s Capital, as well as on how to survive encounters with the specters of cinema. With Michelle Koerner, he co-edited an issue of Polygraph: An International Journal of Culture and Politics (Issue 21, Study, Students, Universities, 2009). Currently he is working on a book on the Soviet filmmaker and theorist Sergei Eisenstein.




Jan
28

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
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Julian Agyeman Beyond Green Environmentalism: E/quality of Life and Just SustainabilitiesPenn Humanities Forum Penn Museum, Rainey Auditorium, 3260 South Street

In our current world of climate change, environmental planning must consider social needs and welfare to offer a truly sustainable model of living. Co-founder of the historic Black Environment Network and author of numerous books and articles, Julian Agyeman charts the future of the global city through the topics of resource distribution, race, class, and space.

Julian Agyeman is Professor of Urban and Environmental Policy and Planning at Tufts University. He is an environmental social scientist whose expertise and current research interests are in the complex and embedded relations between humans and the environment, whether mediated by governmental institutions or social movements, and the effects of this on public policy and planning processes and outcomes, particularly in relation to notions of justice and equity.

Agyeman is co-founder, and editor-in-chief of Local Environment: The International Journal of Justice and Sustainability. With over 150 publications, his recent books include Cultivating Food Justice : Race, Class and Sustainability (MIT Press 2011), Introducing Just Sustainabilities: Policy, Planning and Practice (Zed Books 2013), and Incomplete Streets: Processes, Practices and Possibilities (Routledge 2014).



Feb
3

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Meredith Tamminga “Talk Like a Philadelphian”Penn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Philly folk have a unique way of speaking that extends far beyond “youse,” “jawn,” and “wit wiz or without?” Drawing on 40 years of intensive research conducted at Penn on the Philadelphia accent, Professor Tamminga will play recordings of speech of typical Philadelphians, identifying the words and sounds that make “Philly-speak” unique. She will cover some basic principles of how speech sounds are produced and measured, as well as how and why accents develop over time.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. Contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email bryangm@pobox.upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.



Feb
4

7:00 pm
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Films of Bradford Young: "Pariah" International House, 3701 Chestnut Street

New Black Cinematography
Films of Bradford Young

Penn Humanities Forum in collaboration with Cinema Studies and International House Philadelphia

Pariah (Dee Rees, 2011, 98 minutes)
Alike, a 17-year-old African American teenager, comes to terms with her identity as a butch lesbian and its impact on her family.

Award-winning cinematographer Bradford Young is known for expressive lighting, bold colors, and nuanced representations of dark skin tones on screen. Part of an exciting new wave of independent African American filmmaking, Young uses his stunning visuals to tell stories of family, violence, and diaspora across black communities from New York City to rural Mississippi.



Feb
5

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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Michael Horowitz From "The Interview" to Drone Wars: The International Politics of New TechnologiesKnowledge by the Slice Irvine Auditorium, Cafe 58

Michael Horowitz studies international conflict issues, especially military innovation by state and non-state actors, the role of leaders in international politics, and the intersection of religion and international relations. He spent 2013 at the Pentagon on a Council on Foreign Relations International Affairs Fellowship.

Penn Arts and Sciences' Knowledge by the Slice lunchtime series offers educational talks led by insightful faculty experts. Did we mention there's pizza? So sit back, relax—and have a slice on us.

Can't make it to the lecture? Now you can watch Knowledge by the Slice live online! Visit Knowledge by the Slice Live to learn more, sign up for an email reminder, or view the lecture. You can also view past Knowledge by the Slice lectures here.



Feb
8

2:00 pm - 4:00 pm
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Second Sunday Film Series: “Stilt Dancers of Long Bow Village” and “Guomen: A Village Wedding”Penn Humanities Forum Penn Museum, Rainey Auditorium, 3260 South Street

Local Color 2014-15 | In Association With the Penn Humanities Forum Theme of Color

Stilt Dancers of Long Bow Village (Richard Gordon, Carma Hinton, 1980)
Guomen: A Village Wedding (Gordon, Hinton, 2003)

James Chan presents two films from the Long Bow Village group, one about the rebirth of stilt dancing in a small village in China, joyfully practiced by very young children and elders, the second about folkloric marriage customs returning to Huang Cun village.

This event is free with musuem admission.



Feb
11

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
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Krishnendu Ray Colorful Food: The Asian-American Chef and Ethnic-Haute CuisinePenn Humanities Forum Penn Museum, Rainey Auditorium, 3260 South Street

Ethnic-haute is the improbable joining of two seemingly separate food worlds, across class and restaurant cultures. It is also the basis for many of today's urban culinary success stories. Food studies scholar Krishnendu Ray describes the cosmopolitan phenomenon of Asian chefs who are changing the palates, tastes, and aesthetics of contemporary dining.



Feb
19

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
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David Suzuki The Challenge of the 21st Century: Setting the Bottom Line in the AnthropoceneLevin Family Dean's Forum University Museum, Harrison Auditorium

A scientist, broadcaster, author, and environmental activist, David Suzuki argues that humans are biological beings with an absolute dependence on clean air, water, soil, and sunlight for our survival and well-being, and that we need to rediscover our place in the world so that we and the rest of life can continue to flourish.

Suzuki is Companion to the Order of Canada and a recipient of UNESCO's Kalinga Prize for science, the United Nations Environment Program medal, the 2012 Inamori Ethics Prize, the 2009 Right Livelihood Award, and UNEP’s Global 500. Suzuki is Professor Emeritus at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver and holds 28 honorary degrees from universities around the world. He is familiar to television audiences as host of the CBC science and natural history television series The Nature of Things, and to radio audiences as the original host of CBC Radio's Quirks and Quarks, as well as the acclaimed series It's a Matter of Survival and From Naked Ape to Superspecies. In 1990, with Tara Cullis, he co-founded The David Suzuki Foundation to “collaborate with Canadians from all walks of life including government and business, to conserve our environment and find solutions that will create a sustainable Canada through science-based research, education and policy work.”  His written work includes more than 54 books, 19 of them for children. Suzuki lives with his wife and family in Vancouver, B.C.

About the Levin Family Dean’s Forum
The Levin Family Dean’s Forum is a celebration of the arts and sciences. Initiated in 1984, the Forum presents leading intellectual figures who exemplify the richness of the liberal arts. It also recognizes outstanding undergraduate and graduate students for their academic achievement and intellectual promise. The Levin Family Dean’s Forum is made possible by a generous gift from Stephen A. Levin, C’67, in honor of his son Eric T. Levin, C’92, and Andrew Levin, C'14.

 



Feb
25

5:00 pm - 6:30 pm
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David M. Eagleman The Kaleidoscopic Brain of SynesthesiaPenn Humanities Forum Penn Museum, Rainey Auditorium, 3260 South Street

Imagine a world of magenta Tuesdays, wavy green symphonies, tastes that have shapes, and words that have taste. Called synesthesia, this human perceptual condition in which information between the senses is blended has long fascinated scientists and laypeople alike. Neuroscientist and New York Times bestselling author David Eagleman presents new findings from his research into the behavioral, neurological, and genetic characteristics of synesthetes.



Mar
4

7:00 pm
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Films of Bradford Young: "Mississippi Damned" International House, 3701 Chestnut Street

New Black Cinematography
Films of Bradford Young

Penn Humanities Forum in collaboration with Cinema Studies and International House Philadelphia

Mississippi Damned (Tina Mabry, 2009, 120 minutes)
Three sisters in a small, rural Mississippi town endure cycles of family dysfunction that include alcoholism, illness, and even murder.

Award-winning cinematographer Bradford Young is known for expressive lighting, bold colors, and nuanced representations of dark skin tones on screen. Part of an exciting new wave of independent African American filmmaking, Young uses his stunning visuals to tell stories of family, violence, and diaspora across black communities from New York City to rural Mississippi.



Mar
18

7:00 pm
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Films of Bradford Young: "Middle of Nowhere" and "The Door" International House, 3701 Chestnut Street

New Black Cinematography
Films of Bradford Young

Penn Humanities Forum in collaboration with cinema Studies and International House Philadelphia

Middle of Nowhere (Ava DuVernay, 2012, 97 minutes)
Medical student Ruby learns to live another life when her husband is imprisoned.

The Door (Ava DuVernay, 2013, 9 minutes)
Fifth in fashion brand Miu Miu's "Women's Tales" series, The Door follows five African American women whose strong bond helps one overcome a deep depression following divorce.

Award-winning cinematographer Bradford Young is known for expressive lighting, bold colors, and nuanced representations of dark skin tones on screen. Part of an exciting new wave of independent African American filmmaking, Young uses his stunning visuals to tell stories of family, violence, and diaspora across black communities from New York City to rural Mississippi.