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Oct
25

8:45 am - 5:00 pm
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Dirk Krueger Macroeconomic Measurement, Theory, Prediction, and Policy: A Colloquium Honoring the Legacy of Lawrence R. Klein Steinberg Hall-Dietrich Hall, Room 350, 3620 Locust Walk

Sessions will focus on Macroeconomic Theory and Measurement and Macroeconomic Policy as well as presentations that describe “Klein’s Legacy as Embodied in the Penn Institute for Economic Research,” “Klein’s Legacy as Embodied in The International Economic Review,” and “Klein’s Legacy in Historical Perspective.”

See http://economics.sas.upenn.edu/ to register.

Professor Emeritus Lawrence R. Klein, the Benjamin Franklin Professor of Economics at Penn and recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences in 1980, died October 20, 2013.



Oct
25

9:30 am - 8:00 pm
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Penn Film and Media Pioneers V Fisher-Bennett Hall, 401

Learn about cutting edge research.
Hear from recent graduates who are pursuing media careers.
Discuss the current state of the film and media industry with filmmakers, producers, and other industry leaders.
 
Program

9:30-10:30 a.m. | Breakfast

10:30 a.m.-12:00 p.m. | Fieldwork
Elliot Wolf, Moderator
Karen Beckman
Peter Decherney
Sandra Ristovska

12:00-1:00 p.m. | Lunch

1:00-2:30 p.m. | The Business of Art
Theresa Picciallo, Moderator
Gregory Quinn
Meta Mazaj
Monica Aguirre Diez Barroso

2:30-2:45 p.m. | Musical Interlude
Courtney Cilman, with Mike Machaby on the guitar

2:45-4:15 p.m. | Screens: Big and Small
Augie Bernstein, Moderator
Christopher Bremble
Linda Simensky
Maria Zuckerman

4:15-5:15 p.m. | Keynote
Howard Gordon

6:00 p.m. | Screening | 200 College Hall
Boulevard (2014)



Oct
29

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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Michael Weisberg Public (Mis)Understanding of EvolutionKnowledge by the Slice Irvine Auditorium, Café 58

What do we know about what the public thinks about evolution? What don’t we know yet? And why? Associate Professor of Philosophy Michael Weisberg offers some possible explanations.

Penn Arts and Sciences' Knowledge by the Slice lunchtime series offers educational talks led by insightful faculty experts. Did we mention there's pizza? So sit back, relax, and have a slice on us.

Can't make it to the lecture? Now you can watch Knowledge by the Slice live online! Visit Knowledge by the Slice Live to learn more, sign up for an email reminder, or view the lecture. You can also view past Knowledge by the Slice lectures here: www.sas.upenn.edu/slice



Oct
30

4:00 pm
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John Bosco Lourdusamy Tea and Technology: The Case of Colonial India Van Pelt Library, Conference Room Class of '55, 2nd Floor, 3420 Walnut Street Philadelphia, PA 19104

This lecture is centred on a recently-initiated historical research project on the introduction of technologies related to tea plantations in colonial India—an area very rarely researched in the realm of history of technology. It provides a summary of the distinguishing features of this set of technologies and the broad themes of the project. To start with, this set of technologies has the unusual dimension of having been produced in the west but to be used almost entirely in colonies (unlike in such cases as the railways, textiles, iron, and steel). It was also one of the most difficult to be taken to the final place of use considering the location of the plantations and nature of the terrain. This made demands on other areas of technology like civil engineering (though they were not exclusively driven by demands of tea plantations alone). Within its own domain, tea was the crop which probably had the maximum room for the role of technology, from the clearing of forests to the packing of the tea. This wider ensemble is also related to another peculiarity of tea in which culture (plantation) and processing (factory) processes happen within close proximity and in the same locality, unlike most other crops. The relation between labor and technology has also been important in the case of tea due to the inevitability of labor in certain processes where there is special value for manual work (even to this day). Also discussed will be the roles of individuals and associations that articulated the need, made the demands, and facilitated the flow of technology and the indigenization processes thereafter. Lourdusamy will place and analyze these processes within the broader theoretical discussions on the transfer of technology under colonialism, arguing that the colony had a far greater say in the transfer process due to certain peculiarities in the case of tea, which could account for the greater and faster rate of indigenization.

Co-sponsored with History & Sociology of Science and Penn Libraries.



Oct
30

6:00 pm
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Michael McFaul Confronting Putin’s Russia: Long-Term Economic and Foreign Policy ImplicationsThe Browne Center Anspach Lecture College Hall, 200

2014-2015 Rena & Angelius Anspach Lecture

Michael McFaul was U.S. ambassador to the Russian Federation from January 2012 to February 2014. Prior to becoming ambassador, he served for three years as special assistant to President Obama and senior director for Russia and Eurasian Affairs at the National Security Council.

McFaul is currently a professor of political science, Peter and Helen Bing Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and senior fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Affairs, all at Stanford University. He also works as an analyst for NBC News. He has authored several books, including Advancing Democracy Abroad: Why We Should, How We Can; Transitions To Democracy: A Comparative Perspective with Kathryn Stoner; Power and Purpose: American Policy toward Russia after the Cold War with James Goldgeier; and Russia’s Unfinished Revolution: Political Change from Gorbachev to Putin. His research interests include American foreign policy, great power relations, and the relationship between democracy and development.


Question? Contact Eileen Doherty-Sil, dohertye@sas.upenn.edu



Oct
31

6:00 pm
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Saul Perlmutter Stalking Dark Energy and the Mystery of the Accelerating UniverseThe Elon Musk Public Lecture Anatomy-Chemistry Building, Room 102, 3620 Hamilton Walk

The 1998 discovery that the universe's expansion is accelerating was not only unexpected, but also led to the postulation of a previously-unknown “dark energy” that forms almost three-quarters of the "stuff" of the universe. How was this discovery made? And what has been the progress since in understanding dark energy and the accelerating universe? Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor at University of California, Berkeley, will discuss these questions.



Oct
31

6:00 pm
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Saul Perlmutter Stalking Dark Energy and the Mystery of the Accelerating UniverseThe Elon Musk Public Lecture Chemistry 102

The 1998 discovery that the universe's expansion is accelerating was not only unexpected, but also led to the postulation of a previously-unknown “dark energy” forming almost three-quarters of the "stuff" of the universe. How was this discovery made? And what has been the progress since in understanding dark energy and the accelerating universe?

Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter, an astrophysicist at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor at University of California, Berkeley, will discuss these questions.



Nov
1

10:00 am - 12:00 pm
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Homecoming Weekend Events

Art History Matters

A celebration of the 20th anniversary of the naming of the Elliot and Roslyn Jaffe History of Art Building and the 55th anniversary of the History of Art Department

Art History Matters Panel Discussion

10:00 a.m. in the Rose Recital Hall, Room 419 in Fisher-Bennett Hall, 3340 Walnut Street

A panel of distinguished Penn alumni, faculty and friends will lead an interactive discussion around compelling questions such as: How can art history help us navigate our image-rich culture? Is art collecting more than an investment strategy? How many art historians does it take to change the world?

Panelists Include:
Kathy Sachs (CW’69, PAR’95)
Michael Rosenfeld (C’84)
Kimberly Michelle Brown (GR’04)
Michael J. Lewis (G’85, GR’89)
Matthew Ritchie (Practicing artist)

Penn Back Then

Saturday, November 1, 2014
Locust Walk

Alumni from all generations are invited to contribute notable Penn anecdotes and remembrances to Penn Back Then, a web-based audio scrapbook. Look for roving Penn Back Then recorders and tell them your best story. For past recordings, visit http://www.sas.upenn.edu/pennbackthen/.

For a listing of all the events and registration information click here.