Metz, S. E., Weisberg, D. S., & Weisberg, M. (in press). Non-scientific epistemic criteria sustain counter-scientific beliefs. Cognitive Science.

Weisberg, D. S., Landrum, A. R., Metz, S. E., & Weisberg, M. (in press). No missing link: Knowledge predicts acceptance of evolution in the United States. BioScience. (project registration)

Weisberg, D. S. & Friend, S. (in press). Embracing non-fiction: How to extend the DISTANCING-EMBRACING model [Comment on Menninghaus et al. (in press)]. Behavioral and Brain Sciences.

Kibbe, M. M., Kreisky, M., & Weisberg, D. S. (in press). Young children distinguish between different unrealistic fictional genres. Psychology of Aesthetics, Creativity, and the Arts.

Sobel, D. M., Erb, C. D., Tassin, T., & Weisberg, D. S. (2017). The development of diagnostic inference under uncertainty. Journal of Cognition and Development, 18(5), 566-576.

Panero, M. E., Weisberg, D. S., Black, J., Goldstein, T. R., Barnes, J. L., Brownell, H., & Winner, E. (2016). No support for the claim that literary fiction uniquely and immediately improves theory of mind: A reply to Kidd and Castano's commentary on Panero, Weisberg, Black, Goldstein, Barnes, Brownell, & Winner (2016). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 112(3), e5-e8.

Hopkins, E. J. & Weisberg, D. S. (2017). The youngest readers' dilemma: A review of children's learning from fictional sources. Developmental Review, 43, 48-70.

Panero, M. E.*, Weisberg, D. S.*, Black, J.*, Goldstein, T. R., Barnes, J. L., Brownell, H., & Winner, E. (2016). Does reading a single passage of literary fiction really improve theory of mind? An attempt at replication. (* = joint first authors) Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 111(5), e46-e54.

Weisberg, D. S. (2016). How fictional worlds are created. Philosophy Compass, 11(8), 462-470.

Hopkins, E. J., Weisberg, D. S., & Taylor, J. C. V. (2016). The seductive allure is a reductive allure: People prefer scientific explanations that contain logically irrelevant reductive information. Cognition, 155(3), 67-76.

Weisberg, D. S.*, Hirsh-Pasek, K.*, Golinkoff, R. M., Kittredge, A. K., & Klahr, D. (2016). Guided play: Principles and practices. (* = joint first authors) Current Directions in Psychological Science, 25(3), 177-182.

Hopkins, E. J., Smith, E.D., Weisberg, D. S. & Lillard, A. S. (2016). The development of substitute object pretense: The differential importance of form and function. Journal of Cognition and Development, 17(2), 197-220.

Weisberg, D. S. & Gopnik, A. (2016). Which counterfactuals matter? A response to Beck. Cognitive Science, 41(1), 257-259.

Weisberg, D. S. (2016). Imagination and child development. In A. Kind (Ed.), Routledge Handbook of Philosophy of Imagination (pp. 300-313). New York: Routledge.

Weisberg, D. S., Taylor, J. C. V., & Hopkins, E. J. (2015). Deconstructing the seductive allure of neuroscience explanations. Judgment and Decision Making, 10(2), 429-441.

Ridge, K. E., Weisberg, D. S., Ilgaz, H., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. M. (2015). Supermarket speak: Increasing talk among low-socioeconomic status families. Mind, Brain, and Education, 9(3), 127-135.

Weisberg, D. S., Kittredge, A. K., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Golinkoff, R. M., & Klahr, D. (2015). Making play work for education. Phi Delta Kappan, 96(8), 8-13.

Weisberg, D. S. (2015). Advanced review: Pretend play. WIREs Cognitive Science, 6(3), 249-261.

Weisberg, D. S., Ilgaz, H., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Golinkoff, R. M., Nicolopoulou, A, & Dickinson, D. K. (2015). Shovels and swords: How realistic and fantastical themes affect children's word learning. Cognitive Development, 35, 1-14.

Weisberg, D. S. (2014). The development of imaginative cognition. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplements, 75, 85-103.

Sobel, D. M. & Weisberg, D. S. (2014). Tell me a story: How children's developing domain knowledge affects their story construction. Journal of Cognition and Development, 15(3), 465-478.

Weisberg, D. S., Hirsh-Pasek, K., Golinkoff, R., & McCandliss, B. D. (2014). Mise en place: Setting the stage for thought and action. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 18(6), 276-278.

Weisberg, D. S., Zosh, J. M., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. M. (2013). Talking it up: An analysis of the role of play in language development. American Journal of Play, 6(1), 39-54.

Weisberg, D. S. & Gopnik, A. (2013). Pretense, counterfactuals, and Bayesian causal models: Why what is not real really matters. Cognitive Science, 37(7), 1368-1381.

Weisberg, D. S., Sobel, D. M., Goodstein, J., & Bloom, P. (2013). Young children are reality-prone when thinking about stories. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 13(3-4), 383-407.

Weisberg, D. S. (2013). Distinguishing imagination from reality. In M. Taylor (Ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the Development of Imagination (pp. 75-93). New York: Oxford University Press.

Weisberg, D. S., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. M. (2013). Guided play: Where curricular goals meet a playful pedagogy. Mind, Brain, and Education, 7(2), 104-112.

Weisberg, D. S., Hirsh-Pasek, K., & Golinkoff, R. M. (2013). Embracing complexity: Rethinking the relation between play and learning: Comment on Lillard et al. (2013). Psychological Bulletin, 139(1), 35-39.

Weisberg, D. S. & Leslie, A. M. (2012). The role of victims' emotions in preschoolers' moral judgments. Review of Philosophy and Psychology, 3(3), 439-455.

Buchsbaum, D., Bridgers, S., Weisberg, D. S., & Gopnik, A. (2012). The power of possibility: Causal learning, counterfactual reasoning, and pretend play. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B, 367, 2202-2212.

Weisberg, D. S. & Sobel, D. M. (2012). Young children discriminate improbable from impossible events in fiction. Cognitive Development, 27(1), 90-98.

Weisberg, D. S. & Bloom, P. (2009). Young children separate multiple pretend worlds. Developmental Science, 12(5), 699-705.

Weisberg, D. S. (2009). The vital importance of imagination. In M. Brockman (Ed.), What's Next? Dispatches on the Future of Science (pp. 145-154). New York: Vintage Books.

Weisberg, D. S. & Goodstein, J. (2009). What belongs in a fictional world? Journal of Cognition and Culture, 9(1), 69-78.

Weisberg, D. S. (2008). Caveat lector: The presentation of neuroscience information in the popular media. The Scientific Review of Mental Health Practice, 6(1), 51-56.

Weisberg, D. S., Keil, F. C., Goodstein, J., Rawson, E., & Gray, J. R. (2008). The seductive allure of neuroscience explanations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 20(3), 470-477.
Full stimulus set available at SSRN.

Weisberg, D. S. & Bloom, P. (2007). Why do some people resist science? Science and Public Affairs. 22.

Bloom, P. & Weisberg, D. S. (2007). Childhood origins of adult resistance to science. Science, 316(5827), 996-997.

Skolnick, D. & Bloom, P. (2006). What does Batman think about SpongeBob? Children's understanding of the fantasy/fantasy distinction. Cognition, 101(1), B9-B18.

Skolnick, D. & Bloom, P. (2006). The intuitive cosmology of fictional worlds. In S. Nichols (Ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretense, Possibility, and Fiction (pp. 73-86). New York: Oxford University Press.