Graduate Division

Spotlight

It Takes a Village to Make a Movie (Video)

Ph.D. Candidate Helena de Llanos’ dissertation jumps from the page to the screen.

Listening to Cyborgs (Video)

Doctoral candidates Roksana Filipowska and Maria Murphy create a series of workshops that explore sound technologies and their impact on our daily lives.

When Earthworms Are Earth Savers

Emma Harrison, a doctoral candidate in earth and environmental science, examines the role of these natural excavators in topsoil stability.

Redefining Affirmative Action

A. Rahman Ford examines affirmative action policies on a global scale—while fighting for his health at home.

You Say You Want a Revolution. Then What?

Teece fellow Doğa Kerestecioğlu, a Ph.D. candidate in sociology, is studying how national revolutions turn into national governments.

Welcome to the Graduate Division of Penn's School of Arts and Sciences.

The Graduate Division consists of some 33 graduate programs. Disciplinary strength is at the heart of Penn's excellence in research and graduate training. Equally important, however, is the spirit of interdisciplinary collaboration that pervades all of our programs.

News

  • Spafford Wins NEH Fellowship to Study Japan’s Warrior Houses

    David Spafford, assistant professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, has been awarded a fellowship from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to study the corporate warrior house in Japan from 1450 to 1650. He is researching the social functions of the warrior house, exploring in particular practices and ideas about family identity, survival, and legacy.

  • Study Finds Well-Being Necessary Part of Public Policy Agenda

    “Well-being can and should drive public policy, from the most local to the most international levels.”

  • People More Likely to Defer Making Decisions the Longer They Wait

    Would you rather eat an apple or a banana? Read Moby Dick or A Tale of Two Cities? Is a cup or a mug holding that coffee?

    How quickly the decision gets made matters. That’s because the longer someone takes to draw a conclusion, the more likely that person will disengage from the process altogether and simply never decide.