Every week the Center for Ancient Studies sends a list of events related to the ancient world in the Philadelphia area to interested members.

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Recent Archaeological Excavations in Afghanistan
Saturday, 28 November 2020
1:00 PM
Noor Agha Noori, Director, Archaeological Institute of Afghanistan
Virtual,
Recent archaeological explorations seem to affirm that Afghanistan is the emerging place of many civilizations in South and Central Asia. This land was also the confluence of many trade goods along what would become known as the silk road. Due to the significant geographical location, many empires attempted to occupy the area which left significant influence on local cultures, religions, art, trade, customs, and politics. This amalgamation of cultures opened new ways for connecting people from different parts of the word furthering Afghanistan’s position as a place of exchange. As early as the bronze age, and perhaps earlier, archaeology sites in Afghanistan show evidence of the export of raw materials, most notably lapis lazuli and tin, were exported to Mesopotamian, Egyptian, and Indus Valley civilizations. Recent archaeological explorations in Afghanistan resulted have resulted in very important and exciting discoveries which have shed light on hereto previously understudied periods of Afghan history. Of particular significance are the recent survey and excavations of sites like site of Mes Aynak and Topdara. In this presentation Mr. Noor Agha Noori will discuss recent and ongoing archaeological activities and their contribution to the history of the region. Bio: Mr. Noor Agha Noori is the Director of Archaeological Institute of Afghanistan (AIA) since 2017. He holds an M.Phil. in Archaeology from Hazara University, Pakistan. After his studies he worked with different International Archaeological missions such as the Italian Archaeological Mission and British Archaeological team. He started his career with Archaeology Institute of Afghanistan as a Field Archaeologist at Mes Aynak Archaeological site in Logar Province of Afghanistan. In 2012 he joined National Museum of Afghanistan as Assistant Curator and later served National Museum as Acting Chief curator. Beside other duties at National Museum, Mr. Noori play a key role in organizing the International Exhibitions on Bactrian Treasure and objects from Mes Aynak. He has played a key role in sorting, labeling, cataloguing, and databasing Afghan antiquities. He has also participated in an archaeology outreach program for school boys in Afghanistan. Mr. Noori has worked as the head of excavation for the Archaeology Institute of Afghanistan (AIA) and the field director of the Mes Aynak Archaeological Project (MAAP). As field director he was able to introduce new and advanced Archaeological excavation and recording systems. Currently, Mr. Noori is the Director of the Archaeology Committee of Afghanistan which is the only committee working on the policy level for archaeological matters in the country. He is a board member for both the India-Afghanistan Foundation (IAF) and the Kabul Historic Garden Trust (KHGT). The latter is responsible for the management and preservation of Historic Gardens in Kabul. Mr. Noori has represented Afghanistan in various academic national and international conferences and workshops. He has written and published various articles about Afghanistan’s cultural heritage. Event information: https://www.archaeological.org/event/recent-archaeological-excavations-in-afghanistan/
Sponsored by: Archaeological Institute of America


The Transmission of Omission: Understanding Japan’s 14th-15th Centuries Through Altered Histories
Monday, 30 November 2020
5:15 PM
Thomas D. Conlan, Princeton
Virtual,
Event information: https://www.english.upenn.edu/events/2020/11/30/thomas-d-conlan-princeton-transmission-omission-understanding-japan%E2%80%99s-14th-15th
Sponsored by: Department of English, Penn


For the Welfare of the Whole People: Heritage Stewardship in Indigenous and Black Communities
Wednesday, 2 December 2020
4:00 PM
Virtual,
Local descendant communities and Indigenous nations continue to be at the center of heritage preservation efforts. While their methods are not always recognized by academic or governmental organizations, they employ innovative, culturally appropriate ways of caring for and keeping alive their heritage in all its manifestations. This panel is comprised of leading Indigenous and Black activists, scholars, and community organizers, providing a renewed focus on contemporary conservation practices, history telling, and ways of being in the world. Panelists: - Erik Denson, Lead Instructor, Diving With a Purpose Maritime Archaeology Program - Frandelle Gerard, Executive Director, Crucian Heritage and Nature Tourism - Octavius Seowtewa (A:shiwi), Zuni Cultural Resources Advisory Team - Judy Dow (Winooski Abenaki), Executive Director, Gedakina Moderator: - Reno Keoni Franklin (Kashia Band of Pomo Indians), Tribal Historic Preservation Officer, Estom Yumeka Maidu Tribe Event information and LIVE video: https://vimeo.com/480805303
Sponsored by: Wenner-Gren Foundation, Archaeological Research Facility, UC Berkeley, Society of Black Archaeologists, Indigenous Archaeology Collective, Cornell Institute of Archaeology and Material Studies, SAPIENS


The Afterlife of Chinese Yuan Dynasty Bronzes in Japan
Wednesday, 2 December 2020
6:00 PM
Pengliang Lu, Associate Curator of Chinese Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Virtual ,
The Yuan dynasty (1271-1368) was a key era for the production of “later Chinese bronzes,” a category that received relatively scant attention in comparison to ancient Chinese bronzes. These bronzes actually played a more significant role in China than is currently understood. Interestingly, Japan is a treasure-trove of Yuan bronzes. Since the thirteenth century, Chinese bronzes were exported to Japan and widely used in flower arrangements, incense, and tea ceremonies. Through textual materials and extant examples of bronzes in various public and private collections, this talk will explore how they were appreciated in Muromachi and Edo Japan. Event information and registration link: http://burkecenter.columbia.edu/lectures-symposia/afterlife-chinese-yuan-dynasty-bronzes-japan
Sponsored by: Mary Griggs Burke Center for Japanese Art, Columbia University


You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument
Wednesday, 2 December 2020
6:00 PM
Caroline Randall Williams,
Virtual ,
Monuments can be more than buildings or structures. Caroline Randall Williams—author of the powerful New York Times Opinion piece “You Want a Confederate Monument? My Body Is a Confederate Monument,” which grabbed international attention as a reckoning in the movement to dismantle systemic racism—joins us for this year's Annual Howard C. and Elizabeth Watts Petersen Lecture. Members are welcome to attend a pre-lecture discussion on Monuments from 5–5:45 pm on December 2. Tickets for this lecture are $5 and can be purchased from this link: https://www.penn.museum/calendar/542/you-want-a-confederate-monument Caroline Randall Williams is a catalyst. She makes change possible by bringing art and joy into the room in such a way that the grit of real challenge and limits may become eclipsed by analysis, innovation, and skill. She is an award-winning poet, young adult novelist, and cookbook author as well as an activist, public intellectual, performance artist, and scholar.
Sponsored by: Penn Museum


On Sublimity: A Text in Need of Context
Thursday, 3 December 2020
12:00 PM
Malcolm Heath, University of Leeds
Virtual, Zoom ,
For more information and Zoom link, visit the Classics Dept. website: https://as.nyu.edu/classics/events.html or contact: Greta Gualdi gg1967@nyu.edu or Figen Geerts ffg219@nyu.edu
Sponsored by: The NYU Department of Classics


My Own Flesh and Blood: Stratified Parental Compassion and Law in Korean Slavery
Thursday, 3 December 2020
12:00 PM
Sun Joo Kim , Harvard University
Virtual,
This lecture investigates the relationship between human emotions and slavery in Chosŏn Korea (1392–1910) by examining the legislative processes as well as private practices concerning the status of the offspring of a yangban man and his slave-status concubine. The legislative discussions and decisions on the topic at the royal court often subscribed to the Confucian emotional norms expected of parents. When yangban fathers manumitted their slave-status children, they recorded their feelings in the same affective language expressed in the legal discourses. Yet because slaves were among the yangban’s most valuable possessions and yangban elites regarded the maintenance of social hierarchy as the key for social order, legal paths for manumission were narrowly defined and emotional norms did not always dictate parents’ actions. By exploring the larger legal framework related to slavery, together with specific cases, this lecture seeks to provide a deeper understanding of the historical impact and practices of emotional politics in relation to slavery. It finds that the yangban fathers’ very primordial human emotion towards their own children was stratified by social and economic conditions and selectively applied. Registration required: please register via the following link: https://upenn.zoom us/meeting/register/tJwtd-
Sponsored by: Korean Studies Program, Penn


Between Heritage and Destruction: The Case of the Murujuga Petroglyphs
Thursday, 3 December 2020
12:30 PM
Jose Antonio Gonzalez Zarondona, Columbia University
Virtual ,
Located in the Dampier Archipelago of Western Australia, Murujuga is the single largest archaeological site in the world. It contains an estimated one million petroglyphs, or rock art motifs, produced by the Indigenous Australians who have historically inhabited the archipelago. To date, there has been no comprehensive survey of the site’s petroglyphs or those who created them. Since the 1960s, regional mining interests have caused significant damage to this site, destroying an estimated 5 to 25 percent of the petroglyphs in Murujuga. Today, Murujuga holds the unenviable status of being one of the most endangered archaeological sites in the world and has been nominated to be included in the World-Heritage List by UNESCO. In this Penn Cultural Heritage Center talk, Dr. José Antonio González Zarandona will speak in detail about the history of Murujuga, drawing from his forthcoming book Murujuga: Rock Art, Heritage, and Landscape Iconoclasm, published by Penn Press. Dr. José Antonio González Zarandona is currently a Fellow in the Italian Academy for Advanced Studies in America at Columbia University. He is based in Melbourne at the Alfred Deakin Institute for Citizenship and Globalisation, and for the last ten years he has been researching iconoclasm and heritage destruction in Australia, the Middle East, Mexico, and Myanmar. Murujuga: Rock Art, Heritage, and Landscape Iconoclasm is his second book; he is also the author of several articles on the destruction of cultural heritage by the Islamic State. Additionally, in 2018 and 2019 he was a Visiting Fellow at Forensic Architecture. This event is free to registered guests. Event information and registration link: https://www.penn.museum/calendar/555/between-heritage-and-destruction?fbclid=IwAR35OtbeNygnJczzNwOAbhw44ZPQMFbvFm8ytxy1yj3yn--dMWCTR1yE9qw
Sponsored by: Penn Cultural Heritage Center


Disobedient Allusions: Middle Irish Receptions of the Classics
Thursday, 3 December 2020
1:00 PM
Claudio Sansone, University of Chicago
Virtual,
Part of “Bad Intertextuality in Premodern Literary Cultures: An International Workshop” For more information and Zoom link, contact: del.maticic@nyu.edu
Sponsored by: NYU Department of Classics, Center for Ancient Studies, Institute for the Study of the Ancient World


Epictetus, Caesar, and the Animals
Thursday, 3 December 2020
4:30 PM
Kate Meng Brassel, University of Pennsylvania
Virtual, Zoom,
Abstract: This paper argues that Epictetus’ “On Freedom” (IV, 1) departs from conventional Stoic writings and confronts Roman politics with an Aesopic stance against authority. Standardly, Stoicism, especially Roman Stoicism, has been seen as largely apolitical with its signature focus on the self regardless of political status. Although potential moral equality for all might be democratizing in theory, as a matter of practice the elite Stoic was no boundary-smasher. For example, while at one time Seneca—advisor to Nero—asserted the moral equality of masters and slaves (Ep. 47, 1), he also counselled an elite peer to devote himself to virtue and leave the nitty gritty to hopeless “mules” (Brev. Vit. 18). At the other end of the socioeconomic spectrum—perhaps at one time even across a room from that advisor—was Epictetus, a former slave to Nero’s secretary. Throughout, Epictetus’ diatribes noticeably use terms for “slave” (andrapodon, doulos) to address interlocutors, who are identifiable within the Roman imperial elite. With his guiding emphasis on the free exercise of volition, it might seem natural to read the invocation as merely a lively interpretation of the famous Stoic maxim “every fool is a slave.” But Epictetus’ own real political position between the enslaved and the elite requires that further attention be paid, especially in the case of the virtuosic “On Freedom” (IV, 1), the longest and most stylistically varied diatribe, which focuses acutely on what constitutes true freedom. In recent scholarship, Epictetus’ rhetoric of slave and free has been downplayed as largely accommodatable to the Roman Stoics’ putative indifference to political gains and losses. The density of allusions to Caesar and other wielders of Roman imperium are, on that view, simply ways for the philosopher to make his point through social satire, failing to participate in serious political questions. But in “On Freedom,” Epictetus engages another mode of discourse that runs in subversive parallel to his proclaimed disavowals of politics: animal simile. While Stoics typically use animals to illuminate poor, impulsive behavior, in this diatribe Epictetus uses animals elaborately to illuminate a spectrum of political choices, ranging from the slavish to the radical and democratic. The exceptional use of animal stories engages an alternative wisdom discourse—fable—associated with Aesop, himself traditionally a slave. Plato had exerted himself hard to dissociate from the Aesopic. But Epictetus here subtly reestablishes the identity of philosophy and traditional wisdom, of logos and legein. Fables are reinvested with the responsibility of providing a radical framework to otherwise apparent clichés. Like the fabulists, Epictetus uses animals to avoid making explicit statements about human power, while, in fact, making those statements—and devastatingly. His diatribe presents not merely nice variations on Stoic themes, but articulates sharp anti-Roman critiques from a unique figure at the crossroads of freedom and enslavement, moral and political. Zoom Registration Link: https://upenn.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJcof-iqqz0iG9IwXVpw6TVDLnYQZHkGvBvm After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the Zoom meeting. PLEASE CHECK YOUR SPAM FILTER if you do not get an email in your inbox. You need only register ONCE for the semester.
Sponsored by: Department of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania


Applied Ancient Studies: Reaching out to Non-traditional and Under-served Communities
Thursday, 3 December 2020
5:30 PM
Virtual, Zoom,
Welcome and Introduction: Peter Meineck Associate Professor of Classics in the Modern World, Department of Classics, NYU Panelists: Pam Crabtree- Community Archaeology and Indigenous Populations Professor, Department of Anthropology, NYU Nancy Sorkin Rabinowitz- Prison Education Programming Professor of Comparative Literature Emerita, Hamilton University Desiree Sanchez- Greek Drama for Refugees Executive Artistic Director, Aquila Theatre Jessica L. Adler, with members of The Warrior Chorus- Working with Veterans on Honor Associate Professor of History, Florida International University This event will take place online via Zoom. Registration is free and required at: https://nyu.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_0WnjGqTOTeisfDYjaSW8cA For more information, contact the NYU Center for Ancient Studies at ancient.studies@nyu.edu or 212.992.7978
Sponsored by: NYU Center for Ancient Studies


The Shosoin Treasury: Three Perspectives
Thursday, 3 December 2020
6:00 PM
Yukio Lippit, Harvard University
Virtual,
Followed by a roundtable discussion with Michael Como (Columbia), Bryan Lowe (Princeton), David Lurie (Columbia), and Matthew McKelway (Columbia) Free to registered guests. Registration link to follow. Event information: http://www.keenecenter.org/events_current.html
Sponsored by: Donald Keene Center of Japanese Culture, Columbia University


Mummies with Painted Portraits from Roman Egypt and Personal Commemoration at the Tomb
Thursday, 3 December 2020
6:00 PM
Chris Hallett, University of California, Berkeley
Virtual,
This lecture is free and open to the public, but registration is required at: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1pIQNdRs2acmNRhYETwO-9dhcr-BbGL00IAun7hCf21c/viewform?edit_requested=true This lecture will take place online; a Zoom link will be provided via a confirmation email to registered participants. Please check https://www.ifa.nyu.edu/index.htm for event updates.
Sponsored by: NYU Institute of Fine Arts


Chinese Frontiers and Central Eurasia: Art, Archaeology and History at the Turn of the Common Era
Friday, 4 December 2020
9:00 AM
Virtual,
Online Conference organized by Fanghan Wang (ISAW) and Shujing Wang (NYU Shanghai & ISAW Alumna) The contact between Han China and Central Eurasia had been drastically intensified around the turn of the Common Era when the so-called Silk Road network took shape. The northern frontiers of Han China, as important nodes of the network, were the prominent arenas in which diverse cultural, economic, and socio-political interactions took place among the people who lived a pastoral, agricultural or mixed mode of life. This workshop intends to revisit this interconnectivity with special attention to the complexity of interregional communication and the interactions in frontier region. Introducing new material/textual discoveries and reassessing current scholarship, this workshop highlights a variety of interlocked factors of the frontier process, such as ecological impacts, material exchanges, cultural encounters, and socio-political transformations. Within an interdisciplinary framework, this workshop also stimulates conversations of researchers from different scholarly circles on various issues surrounding the study of frontiers. This conference will take place online; a Zoom link will be provided via confirmation email from Eventbrite to registered participants. Registration is required at: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/chinese-frontiers-and-central-eurasia-at-the-turn-of-the-common-era-registration-128655466965 For event schedule and information: https://isaw.nyu.edu/events/conference-chinese-frontiers
Sponsored by: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU


Discussion with Dan Hicks
Friday, 4 December 2020
12:00 PM
Dan Hicks, University of Oxford, Pitt Rivers Museum
Virtual,
Please join us for a discussion with Dan Hicks about his forth coming book "The Brutish Museums: The Benin Bronzes, Colonial Violence and Cultural Restitution." Dan Hicks, Professor of Contemporary Archaeology, University of Oxford; Curator, Pitt Rivers Museum; and Fellow, St. Cross College, Oxford; to discuss his forthcoming book, The Brutish Museums: The Benin Bronzes, Colonial Violence and Cultural Restitution. Event information and registration link: https://www.brynmawr.edu/events/join-archaeology-discussion-dan-hicks
Sponsored by: Bryn Mawr Archaeology


Distant Views: Visualising Central European Cities in Late Medieval and Early Modern Sources
Friday, 4 December 2020
1:00 PM
Zoë Opačić , Birkbeck, University of London
Virtual,
About the lecture: Byzantine Emperor Constantine dressed as Charles IV Luxembourg of Bohemia is shown Passion relics in the heart of 14th-century Prague. Christ is crucified on the outskirts of medieval Vienna and while Mary and Elisabeth’s affectionate encounter takes place on Seilergasse, the pilgrims to Emmaus lose their way by the Spinnerin am Kreuz. These curious elisions of time and place occur on a series of depictions of Central European cities, which have emerged in the 15th century and marked a moment of deeper self-knowledge and nascent civic pride. The lecture will explore this phenomenon of visual laudes urbium and trace its diverging strategies, roots and meanings on a series of outstanding painted panels, manuscripts, maps, models – and a coffee table. It will be argued that these recognisable and accurate depictions are also images of self, of the known microcosm, identifiable by its walls, towers and landmarks, but equally captured in the moment of continuous architectural reinvention. Zoë Opačić is a senior lecturer in the history and theory of architecture at Birkbeck College (University of London) and a fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London. She specializes in European medieval art and architecture, especially in Central Europe. Her current project is a comparative study of the development of medieval cities focusing on Prague, Vienna and Cracow. Since January 2020, she is a visiting fellow at the Max Weber Institute (University of Erfurt), working on DFG-funded collaborative project “Religion and Urbanity: Reciprocal Formations.” Event information: https://web.sas.upenn.edu/global-medieval-studies/calendar-of-events/
Sponsored by: Faculty Working Group in Global Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies


Virtual Global Guide Tour: Mexico & Central America Gallery
Friday, 4 December 2020
2:30 PM
Virtual,
What better way to learn about the culture of another place than to speak to someone who grew up there? Join us for a thought-provoking tour of the Mexico & Central America Gallery by a guide who grew up in the region. See incredible artifacts from the Maya and Aztec civilizations in context with the contemporary cultures from this part of the world. Through the Global Guides Program, the Museum offers gallery tours led by Philadelphians who grew up in countries around the world. In addition to sharing historical information about the artifacts on display, the guides combine personal experiences and stories to interpret objects from their countries of origin. This event is free to registered guests. Event information and registration link: https://www.penn.museum/calendar/595/virtual-global-guide-tour
Sponsored by: Penn Museum


Bones, Poems and Texts: Violence against Jews in the Plague Year of 1348
Friday, 4 December 2020
3:00 PM
Susan Einbinder, University of Connecticut
Virtual,
Susan Einbinder is professor of Hebrew & Judaic Studies and Comparative Literature at the University of Connecticut. She is the author of Beautiful Death: Jewish Poetry and Martyrdom from Medieval France (Princeton 2002), No Place of Rest: Jewish Literature, Expulsion and the Memory of Medieval France (UPenn Press, 2009) and After the Black Death: Plague and Commemoration Among Iberian Jews (UPenn Press, 2018) where she uncovers Jewish responses to plague and violence in fourteenth-century Iberia. These responses include a medical text by the Jewish physician Abraham Caslari; epitaphs on the tombstones of twenty-eight Jewish plague victims in Toledo; and a liturgical lament written by Moses Nathan, a survivor of an anti-Jewish massacre that occurred in Tàrrega, Catalonia, in 1348. Professor Einbinder's comparative approach encompasses literary and historical as well as scientific genres. Event information and registration link: https://events.temple.edu/bones-poems-and-texts-violence-against-jews-in-the-plague-year-of-1348
Sponsored by: Department of Spanish and Portuguese, Temple


Contriving Scarcity in Early Modern Art and Law
Friday, 4 December 2020
3:30 PM
Shira Brisman, University of Pennsylvania
Virtual ,
Event information and zoom link: https://arth.sas.upenn.edu/events/virtual-colloquium-shira-brisman-contriving-scarcity-early-modern-art-and-law
Sponsored by: History of Art Department, Penn


The Goddess Isis and the Kingdom of Meroe
Friday, 4 December 2020
4:10 PM
Solange Ashby , University of Nebraska-Omaha
Virtual, Zoom,
Event information: http://classics.columbia.edu/events/2020/12/4/classics-colloquium-solange-ashby-university-of-nebraska-omaha
Sponsored by: Columbia University Department of Classics


Homer, Aristotle, and the Nature of Compassion
Friday, 4 December 2020
4:30 PM
Douglas Cairns, University of Edinburgh
Virtual, Zoom,
Open to the public. Registration Link: https://brynmawr-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMpcOuqrzwoGdGUE--eqjoC12xlU5kkP7rU
Sponsored by: Bryn Mawr Classics Department


Monday, 7 December 2020
5:00 PM
Leah Kronenberg, Boston University
Sponsored by: Department of Classics at Rutgers


Excavations at Aphrodisias
Monday, 7 December 2020
6:00 PM
Roland R.R. Smith, University of Oxford
Virtual,
This lecture is free and open to the public, but registration is required at: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSeK34Xr4F3WhAZ53k6heApRPM-u2W-TZsaFFGsfGU5wlzosDA/viewform This lecture will take place online; a Zoom link will be provided via a confirmation email to registered participants. Please check https://www.ifa.nyu.edu/index.htm for event updates.
Sponsored by: NYU Institute of Fine Arts


Origin and Cultural Embedment of the “Stepped Monuments” of Central Anatoli
Thursday, 10 December 2020
1:00 PM
Lorenzo d'Alfonso, ISAW
Virtual, Zoom ,
Lorenzo d'Alfonso is Professor of Western Asian Archaeology and History at ISAW. He earned his MA in Ancient Civilizations from the University of Pavia (1997) and his PhD in Ancient Anatolian and Aegean Studies from the University of Florence (2002). Since then he has worked as a post-doctoral fellow and adjunct professor at the Universities of Mainz, Konstanz, and Pavia. His main research interests concern the social, juridical, and political history of Syria and Anatolia under the Hittite Empire and during its aftermath (16th-7th centuries BC). On these themes he has published a monograph on the judicial procedures of the Hittite administration in Syria (2005), a website of textual references (The Emar Online Database), more than 30 articles in volumes and journals, and co-edited two volumes. From 2006 to 2009 he was the director of an archaeological survey in Southern Cappadocia, and since 2010 he has concentrated his efforts on the site of Kinik Höyük (Niğde, Turkey). Professor d'Alfonso began offering seminars in the spring of 2012. Registration is required and will open on October 1st, 2020. Please check isaw.nyu.edu for event updates.
Sponsored by: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World


Intrepid Women Travelers in Greece
Friday, 11 December 2020
4:30 PM
Mary Norris,
Virtual, Zoom,
Open to the public. Registration Link: https://brynmawr-edu.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJYuceisrjItH9eDGztKtfzfdit0AqAVtHVn
Sponsored by: Bryn Mawr Classics Department


Ensembles and Assemblages: Uncovering the Egyptian Collection at the Barnes Foundation
Saturday, 12 December 2020
3:30 PM
Carl Walsh, Barnes Foundation
Virtual,
*ARCE-PA members will receive an email with the instructions for the ZOOM lecture log-on. Please make sure that we have your correct email address on record. We will require pre-registration for those individuals who are NOT ARCE-PA members. * If you are an ARCE member but are not affliated with ARCE-PA, please reach out to us at info@arce-pa.org. *For those of you are ARCE-PA Friends (non-ARCE members, Penn Museum Members, Penn Staff & Faculty, and Students), we have a $10 registration fee. Once you register, then you will receive an email with the instructions for the ZOOM lecture log-on. The cost for the lectures is $10. Please pay and register by 5pm the Friday evening before the Saturday lecture. Please follow the instructions on the home page for registration and payment details: http://www.arce-pa.org/
Sponsored by: American Research Center in Egypt, Pennsylvania Chapter