Every week the Center for Ancient Studies sends a list of events related to the ancient world in the Philadelphia area to interested members.

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The long life of phrenitis: ancient ideas on the localisation of mental life and health
Thursday, 21 March 2019
4:30 PM
Chiara Thumiger, University of Warwick
Cohen Hall 402, University of Pennsylvania
Phrenitis is one of the most prominent mental diseases (with our explicit categorisation) in ancient medicine, and a disease label that will survive, through varying anatomic localizations and etiologies, through to the psychiatry of the nineteenth century. One of the aspects of its ‚robustness‘ – its ability to persist through time - is its relationship with a key topic in ancient medicine and philosophy, that of the localization of the mental faculties. In this paper I shall introduce the disease and its most common manifestations in ancient medicine, and then move to the topic of its localization between chest and head and the debates it engendered in ancient science. To conclude, I shall offer some observations about the technical status of this disease in ancient discourses, and make a hypothesis towards explaining the long life of phrenitis as diagnosed disease in our medical tradition. Chiara Thumiger is a classicist and historian of ancient science. On the medical side of her research, her interests lie in the area of history of psychiatry and history of the representations of, and ideas about the body and mental health. As a classicist, she has worked on Greek tragedy, ancient views about the self and literary characterization, and ancient animals. She has a strong commitment to bringing these two areas of study, the literary and the cultural-historical in close dialogue with one another. She is the author of A History of the Mind and Mental Health in Classical Greek Medical Thought, Cambridge University Press 2017, and has recently edited Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine. From Celsus to Paul of Aegina (co-edited with P. Singer), Brill, 2018. Currently, she is working on a monograph about the ancient disease phrenitis and its afterlife in the Western medical tradition, and completing a volume on the topic of ‘holism’, ‘connectionism’ and ‘localisation’ in ancient medicine and its reception (Ancient Holisms. Contexts, Forms and Heritage).
Sponsored by: Department of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania


Undergraduate Humanities Forum Research Conference: The Stuff We Carry
Friday, 22 March 2019
9:00 AM
Williams Hall 623 , University of Pennsylvania
Join us as the Wolf Humanities Center's 2018-2019 Undergraduate Research Fellows present their research on Stuff at our 20th Annual Undergraduate Conference. =Conference Program= http://wolfhumanities.upenn.edu/events/stuff-we-carry One session is ancient-world-focused: “Politics, Identity, and Ethics: An Integrated Approach to a Bioarchaeological Collection” by Fiona Jensen-Hitch (Anthropology, English; CAS 2019)
Sponsored by: Wolf Humanities Center, Penn


For Sale or Sailors? Developing a Methodology to Categorize Galley Wares Recovered from Ancient Shipwrecks
Friday, 22 March 2019
12:00 PM
Kris Trego, Bucknell University
Penn Museum Classroom 2, University of Pennsylvania
Sponsored by: AAMW, Penn


Carving Classics: Gustav III's Marble Muses and the Making of the Past in the 18th Century
Friday, 22 March 2019
1:30 PM
Aleksander Musial, Princeton University
Cohen Hall TBA, University of Pennsylvania
Contact: mvl@sas.upenn.edu
Sponsored by: UPenn Classical Reception Research Seminar


The Lyre as a Symbolon: An Ingoldian Reading of Materiality and Ritual in the Homeric Hymn to Hermes
Friday, 22 March 2019
4:30 PM
Manon Brouillet, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales
Carpenter Library B21, Bryn Mawr College
Sponsored by: Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, Bryn Mawr College


We Once Were a Numerous People: Long-term Legacies of Smallpox and Cultural Survival on the Northern North American Great Plains
Sunday, 24 March 2019
2:00 PM
Kacy Hollenback, Southern Methodist University
Eastchester Public Library , Eastchester, NY
Contact between Old World and New World populations resulted in the exchange of ideas, technologies, and practices that dramatically changed world cultures. The Columbian Exchange also resulted in the spread of invasive species, including catastrophic Old World epidemic diseases like influenza, measles, and smallpox. The impacts on peoples in the Americas was disaster. In some areas fifty to eighty percent of the population died. Archaeology has contributed to our understanding of the spread of such epidemics. However, there has often been a focus on when and where disease outbreaks occurred and how many people were affected. Less attention has been given to what life was like for survivors. How did these individuals put their lives and societies back together after devastation? Using theoretical assumptions from the anthropology of disaster and technology, the social impacts of smallpox on survivors can be explored. Such an approach is important, especially in areas with no written record. This presentation explores how the Hidatsa, a group of earthlodge villagers in North Dakota visited by Lewis and Clark and home of Sacajawea, responded to the smallpox epidemics of the 18th and 19th centuries. Specifically, how did individuals maintain or modify daily practice in light of these catastrophic events? This is an important topic to consider because the decisions and actions of those who endured these processes resulted in culture change and cultural survival for Native American Nations today. Kacy Hollenback is Assistant Professor with the Department of Anthropology at Southern Methodist University, and holds her degrees from the University of Arizona. Her areas of specialization include anthropological archaeology and hazards and disaster research, especially the long-term legacies of disaster. Her regional expertise is Northern Plains archaeology and anthropology, and she also maintains interests in the American Southwest. Her current publication project is, with Sarah Trabert, Archaeological Narratives of the North American Great Plains: From Ancient Pasts to Historic Resettlement (in progress).
Sponsored by: Archaeological Institute of America Society: Westchester


Vicious Character Traits as Rational Mistakes: The Early Stoic Explanation of the Diversity of Moral Error
Monday, 25 March 2019
10:00 AM
Simon Shogry, University of Oxford
Philosophy Hall 716,
=Commentators= Natalie Hejduk (Columbia), Anna Schriefl (Bonn) This paper investigates the early Stoic explanation of the diversity of moral error. Why does one vicious agent love money and pursue a life dedicated to the acquisition of wealth, while another seeks political office or sexual pleasure at all costs? Like Aristotle, the early Stoics hold that as a result of differences in upbringing and past experience, vicious agents differ in their character traits. But in light of their psychological monism, the early Stoics cannot adopt an Aristotelian strategy of identifying these character traits as conditions of non-rational spirit or appetite, habituated tendencies for desires and feelings centered on bodily pleasure and social standing that arise independently of reason. Stoic psychology recognizes no such non-rational parts of the adult human mind, and so must understand character traits as states of reason. In this paper, I call attention to two hitherto neglected dimensions of the psychological functioning of vicious character traits that are recorded in our Stoic sources – both of which the early Stoics regard as a kind of intellectual or rational mistake. The first is that vicious character traits control which action-guiding (or ‘hormetic’) appearances the agent forms. For instance, when offered a glass of Merlot at breakfast, only the lover of wine forms the thought that gulping it down is an appropriate practical response. Second, vicious character traits inhibit the agent’s access to evidence she would ordinarily have that would undermine her confidence in the truth of her occurrent action-guiding appearance: she fails to notice genuine conflicts between her existing cognitive commitments and the advisability of the action she is presently considering. In this presentation, I will focus on the second of these rational mistakes brought on by vicious character traits and explore its connection to larger themes in Stoic moral psychology.
Sponsored by: Columbia University’s Division of Humanities, Classical Studies Program, Philosophy Department


Museum and Nation: Architecture, History and Statehood in the United Arab Emirates
Monday, 25 March 2019
12:00 PM
Kishwar Rizvi, Yale University
Jones Hall 202, Princeton University
Kishwar Rizvi is Chair of the Middle East Studies Council at Yale University and Professor of Islamic Art and Architecture. Her recent publications include The Transnational Mosque: Architecture and Historical Memory in the Contemporary Middle East (University of North Carolina Press, 2015), which received the 2017 Charles Rufus Morey best book award from the College Art Association. She is also the editor of the anthology, Affect, Emotion, and Subjectivity in Early Modern Muslim Empires: New studies in Ottoman, Safavid, and Mughal art and culture, editor, (Brill, 2017). Her earlier publications include The Safavid Dynastic Shrine: History, religion and architecture in early modern Iran (British Institute for Persian Studies, I. B. Tauris, 2011) and the anthology, Modernism and the Middle East: Architecture and politics in the twentieth century (University of Washington Press, 2008), which was awarded a Graham Foundation publication grant. Professor Rizvi’s fieldwork includes research in several parts of the Middle East, including Turkey, Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the United Arab Emirates. Current projects include research on contemporary museums in the Gulf as well as a new book on the Safavid ruler, Shah Abbas, and global early modernity. *Light lunch served.
Sponsored by: Program in Near Eastern Studies, Princeton, The Sharim and Bijan Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Iran and Persian Gulf Studies


Octagonal Churches and Their Functions in Late Antiquity
Monday, 25 March 2019
4:30 PM
Mark Johnson, Brigham Young University
McCormick Hall 106, Princeton University
The talk is based on material from my recent book, San Vitale in Ravenna and Octagonal Churches in Late Antiquity. During the third to sixth centuries C.E. large numbers of Christian churches were built throughout the Roman Empire and its heirs. A small number of these buildings were constructed with an octagonal plan, raising the question of why this plan type was chosen in these cases and how the type related to the particular functions for which they were used. The talk explores the various purposes for which these churches were constructed and how form and functions were combined in the culminating building of the type, the church of San Vitale in Ravenna. Mark J. Johnson, earned his Ph.D. in art history in 1986 at Princeton University. He is the author of The Roman Imperial Mausoleum in Late Antiquity (2009), The Byzantine Churches of Sardinia (2013) and San Vitale in Ravenna and Octagonal Churches in Late Antiquity (2018) and one of the co-editors of Approaches to Byzantine Architecture and Its Decoration. Studies in Honor of Slobodan Ćurčić (2012). His other publications have focused on the art and architecture of Late Antiquity and on the Norman period in Southern Italy. He is currently Professor of Ancient and Medieval Art at Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah, where he has taught since 1987.
Sponsored by: Committee for the Study of Late Antiquity, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University, Program in the Ancient World


The Umm an-Nār Mortuary Landscape at Dahwa, Sultanate of Oman​
Tuesday, 26 March 2019
12:00 PM
Kimberly D. Williams, Temple University
Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center , Washington, DC
The geographic focus of the lecture is the Batinah coast of Oman. It is a region critical to understanding the role of human-environmental interactions during the Early Bronze Age. The rare site of Dahwa is a large industrial settlement that was used intensively for copper smelting. This lecture will report the findings from the excavation of the large monumental tomb and bone pit at the Dahwa site. The excellent preservation of these mortuary contexts allows detailed reconstruction of the mortuary ritual and study of the material culture interred. Importantly, this preservation creates an opportunity to use the Dahwa site as a case study for the development of digital cultural heritage management techniques for future study, data dissemination, exploration, and tourism. Kimberly D. Williams is a mortuary archaeologist/bioarchaeologist whose current research is focused on the mortuary and landscape archaeology in Southeastern Arabia. Her current and future work focuses on questions about prehistoric mortuary ritual, funerary landscape formation and use, interred material culture, and archaeological human skeletal remains all recovered via survey and excavation. *Please be sure to register for the free event by sending an RSVP email to: rsvp@sqcc.org with the subject: "Oman Archaeology - Full Name".
Sponsored by: Sultan Qaboos Cultural Center, AIA Society: Washington D.C.


From chaos to chaos: Janus’ Speech in Fasti 1 and the Gates of War
Tuesday, 26 March 2019
4:30 PM
Francesca Romana Berno, Sapienza University of Rome
East Pyne 010, Princeton University
In this paper, starting from the identity between Janus and Chaos that Ovid postulates, I shall analyze the god’s dialogue with the poet in the first book of the Fasti. I intend to prove that the world’s primeval tendency to entropy increase does not vanish with the transition from chaos to cosmos, but remains active on multiple levels in the Fasti, where it plays an even greater role than in the Metamorphoses. First of all, the entropic tendency is embedded in the very appearance of the two-faced god, recalling monstrous, disturbing figures. Secondly, I shall highlight the god’s affinity with Propertius’ Vertumnus (Prop. 4.2), a god who takes all possible shapes without holding on to any one in particular. This affinity shows that, far from emphasizing Janus’ ‘static’ and reassuring role as a god of beginnings, Ovid underscores the god’s unsteady, dynamic features (Janus is the protector of gates and transitions). Finally, various passages in the god’s speech point to the difficult, laborious nature of Janus’ role as guarantor of peace.In my view, this must be explained in terms of the Romans’ fear of a new civil war, a fear which even the text’s propaganda tone cannot soothe. In this regard, an Ovidian image plays a crucial role: the gates of the temple of Janus in Rome, famously closed in times of peace (as in 27 BCE under Augustus). Ovid’s text seems to offer two contrasting explanations of the gates’ function. While they initially appear to defend Peace, they are then said to trap War inside the building, preventing conflict from spreading. I shall argue that the god himself seems to transition from a rather optimistic view, based on his experience as a peaceful king, to a pessimistic one, connected with Rome’s recent history.
Sponsored by: Department of Classics at Princeton University


Domestication, Demography, and Settlement: Alternative Mathematics for Early Agriculture
Wednesday, 27 March 2019
6:00 PM
Dorian Q. Fuller, University College London
ISAW Lecture Hall, New York University
=Rostovtzeff Lecture Series= Feeding Civilizations: A Comparative Long-Term Consideration of Agricultural and Culinary Traditions across the Old World An activity that all humans and all societies share is the cooking, preparation and sharing of food. And while food is a biological necessity it is heavily framed by cultural traditions and social constructs. It is well-known that cooking separates Homo sapiens and its immediate ancestors from all other primates, and this involvement with easier to digest cooked foods afforded us larger brains, smaller guts, and a new focus for the evolution of technology and techniques—for getting, preparing, storing, and serving food. A subfield of archaeology, archaeobotany, has concerned itself with the recovery of material traces of plants, an essential component of all dietary diversity, providing evidence both of what people ate, where it came from—field or forest—but also how it was transformed into the artefacts we call prepared foods, drinks or meals. As recognized by Levi-Strauss, the raw, the cooked, and the rotten provide a potent framework through which to view cultural constructions of the social and natural world. These lectures will explore how agricultural production and cooking traditions both underpinned the possibility of civilization and also helped to characterize the regionally distinct forms that civilization took across the Old World, especially in China, Mesopotamia, Egypt, southern India, and parts of sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, the lecture series will explore how plants were transformed through domestication into the basis of agricultural economies and how plant products were turned into the food products that both supported large human populations and underpinned social differentiation. The term civilization is used in two senses: first, in the sense common in English anthropological literature as relating to cities, states, and hierarchical or complex societies; and, second, in a Francophone (Maussian) sense of defining regional constellations of cultural patterns that transcend individual polities but unite regional networks societies. This lecture will reconsider the origins of agriculture based on recent empirical evidence that tells us both how grain crops were domesticated and how slowly this process unfolded, in West Asia, East Asia, parts of Africa, and India. Archaeobotany is providing a growing evidence base for the ways in which plants became adapted as crops through morphological changes, which were in turn tied to shifts in human practices. The co-evolution was slow, however, and it will be argued that the more revolutionary shift towards agricultural economies was substantially later (a few millennia) than the start of domestication itself. Agricultural economies can be defined as those systems in which wild foraging came to make a much reduced or even marginal caloric contribution to diet, and efforts at food production began to take place at a landscape scale. Different regional trajectories, however, differed in terms of the nature of landuse due to fundamental differences in the potential of crop yields, and the diversity of the initial crop package. This meant that some regions, such as West Asia based on wheat, barley, and pulses or the Yangtze based on flooded rice and fish, were able to sustain denser populations, while other regions, like savannas in Africa or India or the northern Chinese steppe were more prone to agricultural expansion through population dispersal and regional infilling. Thus from the starting point of domestication we can trace variations in productive capacity that underpinned the demographic processes that led to the emergence of cities across parts of the Old World. Dorian Fuller grew up in San Francisco, California. He took his B.A. at Yale University, majoring in Anthropology and Organismal Biology (1995). He received a British Marshall scholarship to study for an M.Phil. in Archaeology at Cambridge University (1997). He then received his Ph.D. from Cambridge with a dissertation on “The Emergence of Agricultural Societies in South India: Botanical and Archaeological Perspectives” (2000). He became a Lecturer at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London, in 2000, where he has taught on archaeobotany, environmental archaeology, Nubia, and Asia. He was promoted to Reader (2009) and then Professor of Archaeobotany (2012). He has carried out archaeological fieldwork in India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Myanmar, Thailand, China, Turkey, Iraq, Morocco, Ethiopia, and Sudan and archaeobotanical laboratory analyses even more widely. He co-authored Trees and Woodlands in South India: Archaeological Perspectives (2008) and has published more than 300 articles and chapters. He received a European Research Council Advanced Investigator Grant on “comparative pathways to agriculture” (2013-2018) and several major grants from the UK Natural Environment Research Council. *Registration is required at isaw.nyu.edu/rsvp
Sponsored by: Roger and Whitney Bagnall, ISAW, NYU


Leadership Lessons from Rome: An Experiment in Applied Classics
Thursday, 28 March 2019
4:30 PM
Emma Dench, Harvard University
Cohen Hall 402, University of Pennsylvania
Each year the Graduate Group in Ancient History at Penn hosts a weeklong visit by a distinguished ancient historian. This year’s Hyde Visitor is Professor Emma Dench, who is McLean Professor of Ancient and Modern History and of the Classics and Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at Harvard University. She is the author of From Barbarians to New Men: Greek, Roman, and Modern Perceptions of Peoples from the Central Apennines (Clarendon Press, Oxford, 1995), Romulus' Asylum: Roman Identities from the Age of Alexander to the Age of Hadrian (Oxford University Press, 2005), and Empire and Political Cultures in the Roman World (Cambridge University Press 2018. In her Hyde Lecture, Professor Dench will talk about “Leadership Lessons from Rome: an experiment in applied Classics.” How could ancient Rome possibly help us, with its mad emperors, tight hierarchies and snail-pace communications? Is it a valid exercise to look for lessons in antiquity, and, if so, what kinds of lessons are worth pursuing? Emma Dench reflects on a year-long experiment co-teaching an MBA elective course at Harvard Business School with Frances Frei (UPS Professor of Technology and Operations Management) in 2015-16, and on how Rome helps her in her current “day job” as Dean of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. PLEASE FIND THE POSTER ATTACHED
Sponsored by: Graduate Group in Ancient History at Penn


King Richard III: The Resolution of a 500-year-old Cold Case
Thursday, 28 March 2019
6:00 PM
Turi E. King, University of Leicester
Penn Museum ,
When the Grey Friars project began to excavate beneath a car park, most thought the chance of finding the remains of Richard III were slim to none. Turi King oversaw the planning of the excavation and the subsequently revealing DNA and genetic analysis of the skeletal remains. Additional info at http://aiaphiladelphia.blogspot.com/


Pilgrimage to an Imagined West: Antiquity and the Early Ballets Russes
Thursday, 28 March 2019
6:00 PM
Lynn Garafola, Columbia University
ISAW , New York University
“We were all revolutionists in those days ... fighting for the cause of Russian art,” Serge Diaghilev, the founder and longtime director of the Ballets Russes, told American critic Olin Downes in 1916. “We have tried, ... to build up an art expressive in every phase of the Russian temperament.” Raised in Perm at the foot of the Ural Mountains, Diaghilev began his artistic journey in the Russian heartland, and the early years of the Ballets Russes were filled with its sounds, stories, and images. But the Mediterranean world also beckoned, and its call led to the creation of several ballets set in antiquity, in the imagined heart of the West. This talk will explore the idea of antiquity in the Ballets Russes as an assertion of Western identity amid the exotic splendors of Russianness. *Registration is required at isaw.nyu.edu/rsvp
Sponsored by: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU


The Changing Images of the Third Princess from the Tale of Genji
Thursday, 28 March 2019
6:00 PM
Masako Watanabe, Independent Scholar
Schermerhorn Hall 807, Columbia University
A particular episode from the 34th chapter of the Tale of Genji known as “New Herbs” describes one of the critical moments in the life of Hikaru Genji. The young noble, Kashiwagi, catches a glimpse of Genji’s young wife, the Third Princess. This incident develops into an illicit love affair – Kaoru is born, the Third Princess becomes a nun and Kashiwagi falls ill and dies. The lecture will introduce the transformation of images of the Third Princess by examining pictorial examples from the Edo period.
Sponsored by: COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY, Japanese Art Society of America (JASA)


The Palace of Sans-Souci in Milot, Haiti (c. 1806-1813): The Untold Story of the Potsdam of the Rainforest.
Thursday, 28 March 2019
6:30 PM
Gauvin Alexander Bailey, Queen's University
Barnes Foundation Comcast Auditorium, Philadelphia
24th Annual Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Art - Keynote Lecture One of the most dramatic and least-studied neoclassical buildings in the Western Hemisphere, King Henry I Christophe’s opulent palace in Haiti towers over the agricultural town of Milot. Construction began circa 1806, less than a decade after Haitian independence, under Henry I, the Americas’ first black king. This massive structure was built to demonstrate Haiti’s capacity to stand up to a world in which most global powers were still monarchies or empires. Although a UNESCO World Heritage Site and a major tourist attraction in the 1940s and '50s, the building has never been the subject of concentrated scholarly study. It is therefore the source of much mythmaking and speculation, having been attributed to imprisoned French workers, Prussian volunteer soldiers, renegade Napoleonic generals, and re-enslaved Africans—among others. Using unpublished archival sources and a photographic survey undertaken in 2017, this lecture will examine the circumstances, influences, and builders of this extraordinary monument to show its position at the nexus of a global network of cultures at the dawn of Caribbean and Latin American independence, from France, Prussia, Spain, Great Britain, to the Kingdom of Dahomey and including figures as varied as Duke Leopold of Lorraine, Toussaint Louverture, Napoléon Bonaparte, George III, and Frederick the Great. *For more information and to register for the event, click https://www.barnesfoundation.org/whats-on/graduate-student-symposium-history-of-art-keynote-lecture-2019
Sponsored by: Penn History of Art, Barnes Foundation


24th Annual Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Art
Thursday, 28 March 2019
6:30 PM
Multi-speakers, N/A
Barnes Foundation Comcast Auditorium, Philadelphia
24th Annual Graduate Student Symposium on the History of Art =Conference Program= https://www.barnesfoundation.org/whats-on/graduate-student-symposium-history-of-art-2019 One presentation is the antiquity focused: -”Form as Function in Roman Retrospective Statuary,” Daniel Healey, Princeton University
Sponsored by: Penn History of Art, Barnes Foundation


Pro Marcello without Caesar: Grief, Exile and Death in Cicero Ad Familiares 4
Thursday, 28 March 2019
7:30 PM
Roy Gibson, Oxford
Faculty House , Columbia University
Book 4 of the Ad Familiares is invisible, non-existent, in the chronological editions and translations of Cicero’s correspondence that are most widely used in the Anglophone world. In this paper, I argue that the anonymous editor of Ad Familiares 4 has artfully compiled a unit that delivers a striking storyline and a cluster of thematic connections and developments that are both coherent and meaningful. All of Cicero’s correspondents in Ad Familiares 4 are united by the contemporaneous experience of exile or residence in Greece and the eastern Mediterranean after the outbreak of civil war in 49. The attempt by Cicero to obtain from Julius Caesar the pardon of Marcellus forms the central plank of the book. The optimism for the political future of Rome generated by the securing of his pardon is extinguished in the editor’s non-chronological scheme - twice: first by the death of Cicero’s beloved daughter Tullia in early 45; and then by the suspicious death of Marcellus himself. Grief, philosophy and consolation are recurring themes in the book, even before the demise of Tullia. These motifs are given both new force by her death and depth by the fusing of Cicero’s despair over Tullia with the anguish of the senatorial correspondents for the extinction of the res public.
Sponsored by: Columbia University Department of Classics


Interconnections in the Ancient World
Friday, 29 March 2019
9:00 AM
Adam DiBattista, UCLA
Center for Historical Analysis , Rutgers
Modern views of the ancient world often divide cultures into singular categories like the Egyptians or the Greeks, ignoring the role played by interaction and exchange in shaping these cultures. This distorts our view of the ancient world and reinforces outdated ideas about “cultural evolution.” This seminar examines how the highly interconnected world of the Late Bronze Age Aegean and Near East (ca. 1500-1100 BCE) fostered an environment of experimentation and internationalism. We will examine how the subsequent breakdown of Bronze Age society (ca. 1200-1000 BCE) led to widespread destruction and instability. However, it also created new opportunities for the creation of cultural identities in subsequent periods. We will then trace the legacy of Bronze Age internationalism into the Early Iron Age and so-called Orientalizing periods of Ancient Greece (1100-600 BCE). Here we see how the intellectual and material world of Homer was shaped by foreign individuals like Phoenician merchants and Anatolian kings. This seminar will complicate more monolithic views of the ancient world which has ramifications for the entire notion of the Western intellectual tradition.
Sponsored by: Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis


Ovidius Philosophus: An International Conference on Philosophy in Ovid and Ovid as a Philosopher
Friday, 29 March 2019
10:00 AM
Multi-speakers,
Schermerhorn Hall 612, Columbia University
Friday, March 29, 2019 10:00 AM - Saturday, March 30, 2019 7:00 PM =Conference Program= http://classics.columbia.edu/events/2019/3/29/ovidivs-philosophvs-an-international-conference-on-philosophy-in-ovid-and-ovid-as-a-philosopher *For more information, please contact Katharina Volk (kv2018@columbia.edu) or Gareth Wlliams (gdw5@columbia.edu).
Sponsored by: Columbia University Department of Classics, Center for the Ancient Mediterranean, Heyman Center and Society of Fellows in the Humanities, University Seminar in Classical Civilization


AAMW Lunch Talk: Valéria Kulcsár (University of Szeged/Penn)
Friday, 29 March 2019
12:00 PM
Valéria Kulcsár , University of Szeged/Penn
Penn Museum Classroom 2, University of Pennsylvania
Sponsored by: AAMW at Penn


Sappho in Imperial Greek Literature
Friday, 29 March 2019
4:30 PM
Ewen Bowie, Oxford University
Carpenter Library B21, Bryn Mawr College
*PLEASE NOTE: The Colloquium Tea will be in the London Room, Old Library.
Sponsored by: Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, Bryn Mawr College


Bronze-vessel Casting Industry and Regional Center of the Huai River Valley during the Shang (ca. 1400–1200 BC)
Friday, 29 March 2019
4:30 PM
Xiaolin He, Wuhan Universithy/Harvard
Faculty House , Columbia University
For details PLEASE FIND THE POSTER ATTACHED
Sponsored by: The Tang Center for Early China, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultuires, Columbia, The Columbia University Seminars, Columbia University


The Filologos and the Antiquarius
Friday, 29 March 2019
4:45 PM
Multi-speakers,
Dickinson Hall 211, Princeton University
Studying Language and Objects in Renaissance Europe. A 2- Day Interdisciplinary Workshop Organized by: Lillian Datchev, Mateusz Falkowski, Anthony Grafton, and Nigel Smith =Keynote Speaker= Elisabeth Décultot, University of Halle-Wittenberg “Between Antiquarianism and Philology: The Emergence of Art History in the 18th Century” =Workshop Schedule= https://renaissance.princeton.edu/wp-content/uploads/sites/11/2019/02/SCHEDULE.-Filologos-and-Antiquarius-Workshop.pdf
Sponsored by: Center for Collaborative History, Art and Archaeology Department, Classics Department, Hellenic Studies, Committee for the Study of Late Antiquity


Ancient Judaism Regional Seminar
Sunday, 31 March 2019
11:30 AM
Multi-speakers,
Bingham Hall Comparative Literature Library, Yale University
Ancient Judaism Regional Seminar at Yale from 3/31-4/1. The Ancient Judaism Regional Seminar is an annual event that brings together faculty and graduate students with the aim of enhancing graduate training in Ancient Judaism by providing opportunities for doctoral students to share dissertation research and build academic networks among faculty and students in the Northeast Corridor. =Presenters= James Nati (Yale) — “What was the Aramaic Levi Document?” Elena Dugan (Princeton) — “The Hidden Face of the Codex Panopolitanus Book of the Watchers: A Biography of Enoch” Meira Wolkenfeld (YU) — “Discernment through Scent in Palestinian and Babylonian Texts” Pratima Gopalakrishnan (Yale) — “Work and Maintenance in the Babylonian Talmud” Erez DeGolan (Columbia) — “Public Joy in Ancient Rabbinic Literature” Dov Kahane (JTS) — “The World has been Given to the Fools: Rabbinic Anxiety in the Sasanian Context” Yoni Nadiv (Yale)— “Digital Applications for the Study of the Babylonian Talmud” Jill Stinchcomb (Penn) — “Riddling Authority with the Queen of Sheba” Shlomo Zuckier (Yale) — “Now, It’s Personal: Sacrifice as Human-Divine Interaction in Rabbinic Literature” *As a reminder, the Yale Judaic Studies Program will cover the cost of a shared hotel room, conference meals, and economy travel expenses for all presenters. For those who are not presenting but would like to attend, we will cover the cost of meals at the conference as well as a reimbursement of $50 for travel expenses. Please submit travel receipts to Renee Reed (renee.reed@yale.edu).
Sponsored by: Yale Judaic Studies Program


Ovid and Art, A Symposium
Thursday, 4 April 2019
1:00 PM
multi-speakers,
Hemmerdinger Hall 102, New York University
KEYNOTE SESSION “The Metamorphosis in the Garden” by Alessandro Barchiesi, NYU =Conference Program= http://as.nyu.edu/ancientstudies/news.html *Enter at 31 Washington Place for wheelchair access **This event is free and open to the public, but an RSVP is required. RSVP at: https://goo.gl/forms/VqSyeb0UHYjDEB3K3
Sponsored by: The NYU Center for Ancient Studies, Department of Art History, NYU, Grey Art Gallery


King Richard III: The Resolution of a 500 Year-Old Cold Case
Monday, 8 April 2019
6:15 PM
Turi King, University of Leicester
Penn Museum , University of Pennsylvania
When the University of Leicester Archaeology Service in England undertook the Grey Friars project, it was thought that the chances of finding the remains of Richard III were slim to none. Nevertheless, Dr. Turi King, with her background in both archaeology and genetics, was approached by the lead archaeologist to oversee the DNA analysis in case skeletal remains that were a “good candidate” to be former monarch were found. In her lecture, Dr. King will speak about the Grey Friars project, from the early stages of planning the dig, through to the excavation and the results of various strands of analysis, particularly the genetics, carried out on the remains. Dr. Turi King is Professor of Public Engagement, as well as Reader in Genetics and Archaeology at the University of Leicester, and Director of the Forensic and Ancient Biomolecules (FAB) Group. *Reception with speaker to follow.
Sponsored by: The AIA Philadelphia Society