Every week the Center for Ancient Studies sends a list of events related to the ancient world in the Philadelphia area to interested members.

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“The Way Things Should Have Been”: The Forging of Ancient Iran in the Qajar and Pahlavi Periods
Tuesday, 18 September 2018
12:00 PM
Khodadad Rezakhani , Princeton University
Penn Museum Classroom 2, University of Pennsylvania
At the beginning of the Qajar period (1793-1927), the understanding of ancient Iranian history was based on medieval historiographic sources such as the Shahnameh of Ferdowsi or the History of al-Tabari. With the introduction of Iran to Western historiography throughout the 19th century, an understanding of the history of pre-Islamic Iran was formed. Fascination with this history can be detected all around Qajar artistic and literary production, and was to dramatically affect the Iranian national identity at the beginning of the 20th century. This talk would discuss the intellectual exchanges that resulted in this fascination and their effect on the history of the late 19th and early 20th century Iran.
Sponsored by: Center for Ancient Studies


Grounds for Sculpture: Presentation and Reception with Tallur L.N.
Tuesday, 18 September 2018
6:00 PM
Tallur L.N.,
, Grounds For Sculpture
Join us for a special presentation and private reception with artist Tallur L.N., who will be visiting New Jersey from Karnataka, India. Tallur will share his artistic process as well as his plans for his forthcoming major exhibition at Grounds For Sculpture. His intriguing contemporary sculptures incorporate Hindu and Indian iconography in ways that balance the historic and contemporary, sacred and secular, local and global. Grounds For Sculpture is a 42-acre sculpture park and contemporary art museum located near Princeton, attracting 250,000+ visitors each year. This exhibition is part of a series of projects that affirm Grounds For Sculpture’s commitment to reflecting the diversity of both our region and the dynamic world around us. We are excited that this will be our first exhibition to feature an artist of Indian descent and artistic influence. We are looking for partnership, support and advisors as we move in this new direction. RSVP: Akshay Dargan adargan@groundsforsculpture.org
Sponsored by: South Asia Center, University of Pennsylvania


Views of Athens in America: Greek Revival Architecture and the Iconic Athenian Models
Tuesday, 18 September 2018
7:15 PM
Theodoros Koutsogiannis, The Collections of the Greek Parliament
Schermerhorn Hall 612, Columbia University
Sponsored by: Columbia University


Two Centuries of Silence: Abdulhossein Zarrinkoub and the Formation of Iranian National Identity
Wednesday, 19 September 2018
2:00 PM
Paul Sprachman, Rutgers
Towne Building Rm 307, University of Pennsylvania
Please join us for a talk by Rutgers Professor Emeritus, Paul Sprachman, on the work of Dr. Abdolhossein Zarrinkoub (1923-1999), one of the most prolific scholars of his generation. Professor Sprachman will specifically address Zarrinkoub's major work Two Centuries of Silence which discusses the period between the mid-7th and the mid-9th century when almost all traces of Iran's literary heritage was erased.
Sponsored by: Middle East Center, University of Pennsylvania, Near Eastern Languages & Civilizations, University of pennsylvania


A New Fragment of Sophocles' Tereus (fr. 583 + POxy. 5292): Some Methodological Considerations
Thursday, 20 September 2018
4:30 PM
Doug Olson, University of Minnesota
Cohen Hall 402, University of Pennsylvania
Our knowledge of Sophocles’ fragmentary Tereus has now been enriched by the publication of POxy. 5292, portions of which overlap with S. fr. 583 (preserved by Stobaeus). Among other things, the new material appears to confirm that the speaker of fr. 583 is Tereus’ wife Procne and to establish that she is onstage with the chorus, ruling out the possibility that the lines belong to the prologue. It also shows that the speech to which fr. 583 belongs was followed by the arrival of a Shepherd, seemingly bearing news for the queen. The implications of the papyrus have been considered at length by Patrick Finglass in a recent article. But Finglass’ larger interests have to do with methodology, and he closes his main discussion by expressing the hope that “sober reflection on what previous scholars have got wrong — and right — should assist future research on fragmentary drama”. Unfortunately, Finglass is rarely explicit about either his own working methods or what he believes can be learned from earlier scholarly conjectures regarding the text and action of the Tereus. My goal in this paper is to articulate a number of significant aspects of Finglass’ treatment of S. fr. 583+POxy. 5292, and to treat these as a basis for a series of remarks regarding the handling of fragmentary literary material generally.
Sponsored by: Department of Classical Studies, University of Pennsylvania


Troy and Gordion: The Historiography of Excavation at Two Legendary Sites in Anatolia
Thursday, 20 September 2018
6:00 PM
C. Brian Rose, University of Pennsylvania
ISAW Lecture Hall, New York University
I have had the good fortune to direct or co-direct excavations at two legendary sites in Turkey -- Troy and Gordion, and the fieldwork that I have conducted there over the course of the last 25 years has continually required me to assess the most effective strategies for presenting them to the public and the scholarly community. In this talk I attempt to place my own work at these sites in historiographic perspective -- highlighting the positive and negative aspects of the projects, with a focus on the extent to which regional, national, and global developments have shaped our research agendas. I also reflect on the discipline of archaeology in Turkey and the Near East at the end of the talk. C. Brian Rose (BA, Haverford College; MA and PhD, Columbia University) is James B. Pritchard Professor of Mediterranean Archaeology and Curator-in-Charge of the Mediterranean Section of the University Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at the University of Pennsylvania. Since 1988 he has been Head of Post-Bronze Age excavations at Troy, and between 2004 and 2007 he directed a survey project in the Granicus River Valley that focused on recording and mapping the Graeco-Persian tombs that dominate the area. In 2013 he became director of the Gordion Excavations in central Turkey. His research has concentrated on the political and artistic relationship between Rome and the provinces (Dynastic Commemoration and Imperial Portraiture in the Julio-Claudian Period, Cambridge, 1997), and on the monuments of Troy during the Classical periods (The Archaeology of Greek and Roman Troy, Cambridge, 2014). He served as president of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) between 2007 and 2011, and received the AIA's Gold Medal in 2015. He has been a Trustee of the American Academy in Rome since 2001, and currently serves as Chair of the Executive Committee of the Board of Trustees. Registration is required at isaw.nyu.edu/rsvp Admission to lecture closes 10 minutes after scheduled start time. Reception to follow.
Sponsored by: Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at NYU , AIA Society: Philadelphia


The Dionysian Poetics of Seneca’s Oedipus
Thursday, 20 September 2018
7:30 PM
Jeri Debrohun, Brown University
Faculty House , Columbia University
Seneca augments the Sophoclean kernel of his Oedipus, from the start, not only with a Bacchic dimension generally but also, more specifically, with allusions to the tragedy of Agave and Pentheus as it was presented in Euripides’ Bacchae. In his final scenes, Seneca vividly stages the culmination of the multilayered nightmarish effects he has created, over the tragedy’s course, by adding Dionysiac and underworldly dimensions to the Apollonian foundation of Oedipus’ story as it was made most famous by Sophocles. For the dramatic finále of Oedipus, Seneca employs tragic contaminatio, blending elements from the closing scenes of Euripides’ Bacchae with those of his primary model, Sophocles’ Oedipus Tyrannus. Through a kind of allusive metamorphosis, the Bacchus-inspired madness of the earlier tragedy’s mother and son pair is partially and temporarily transferred to the figures of Jocasta and Oedipus, thus further ensuring that Seneca’s characters both meet their required fates.
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Graduate Program, Columbia University


Old wine in new bottles: Towards a new history of Roman viticulture in Late Republican and Early/High Imperial Italy
Friday, 21 September 2018
11:00 AM
Dimitri Van Limbergen, University of Ghent
Italian Academy 5th Floor, Columbia University
There is still a widespread view that Rome’s expanding economic influence over the Mediterranean in the Late Republic (ca. 250-30 BC) triggered a dramatic change in Italy’s wine industry. This bouleversement allegedly entailed a shift from 1) extensive mixed vine plantations to more profitable intensive vineyards, 2) subsistence farms to commercial ‘villa’ estates equipped with presses, 3) and free peasants to imported slaves in the agricultural workforce. The massive shipment of these wines to external markets could be traced through the widespread occurrence of Italian amphorae across the Mediterranean. When from Augustus onwards (27 BC-AD 14), Italy’s speculative vineyards lost their monopoly to the emancipating provinces, the country’s proto-capitalist villa-and-slave viticulture gradually fell into decline in the course of the 1st-2nd century AD, thus propelling Italian agriculture into a deep crisis. Over the years, many of the textual and archaeological data used in the construction of this metanarrative have proven to be discordant, or at least inconclusive, and this orthodox view has rightfully been criticized for its overly schematic approach (boom vs. bust), its one-sided focus on external markets, and its application of too unsophisticated ‘substitution’ or ‘entspezialisierung’ scenarios. In spite of all this, it has proven resilient in recent scholarship, perhaps because of its convenient simplicity, or because of its resemblance to modern-day economic systems. But above all, this shows the current lack of a sound alternative explanatory framework. In this talk, I discuss how we can use the ancient source material (amphorae, presses, villas) to draft a new biography of Roman viticulture in Late Republican and Early/High Imperial Italy. To this purpose, I focus on the role of domestic urban market developments, population trends, environment and climate, and the much-neglected survival of traditional vine agroforestry systems (arbustum) in Italy. In the end, these building blocks should stimulate us to start thinking differently about what happened to Rome’s wine business between the mid-third century BC and the end of the second century AD.
Sponsored by: The Center for the Ancient Mediterranean (CAM), Columbia University


Graduate Student Publishing
Friday, 21 September 2018
12:00 PM
Lauren Ristvet & Robert Ousterhout, University of Pennsylvania
Penn Museum Classroom 2, University of Pennsylvania
This week's AAMW colloquium will be a professionalization talk given by Professors Lauren Ristvet and Bob Ousterhout on the ins and outs of publishing for graduate students. They will give a brief presentation, after which there will be ample time for discussion, so please come armed with questions or send them to me (jsigmier@sas.upenn.edu) or Sami (slindgr@sas.upenn.edu) so that we can pass them along to the presenters ahead of time!
Sponsored by: Department of Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World, University of Pennsylvania


Grappling with Hercules: The Heroic Male Nude and the Embodied Viewer around 1600
Friday, 21 September 2018
3:30 PM
Kendra Grimmett, University of Pennsylvania
Jaffe Building 113, University of Pennsylvania
Sponsored by: Department of History of Art, University of Pennsylvania


Faceless Hierarchy and Early Maya States
Friday, 21 September 2018
4:10 PM
Timothy Pugh, Queens College & The Graduate Center, CUNY
Schermerhorn Extension 951, Columbia University
Sponsored by: Department of Anthropology, Columbia University


Theopompus' Homer: Epic Parody in Greek Comedy
Friday, 21 September 2018
4:30 PM
Matthew Farmer, Haverford College
Carpenter Library B21, Bryn Mawr College
Tea at 4 p.m., Quita Woodward Room, Old Library
Sponsored by: Greek, Latin, and Classical Studies, Bryn Mawr College


"Harm is what befell me, when I was but a child!": Commemorating Children in Greco-Roman Egypt
Friday, 21 September 2018
5:00 PM
Lissette Jimenez, San Francisco State University
Gilman Hall Room 50 , Johns Hopkins University
Textual, archaeological, and visual material culture have offered valuable clues to the experiences and characteristics of lived childhoods in Greco-Roman Egypt. In particular, child mummies and their accompanying funerary goods indicate how children were perceived and commemorated in death during the later stages of Egyptian history. In particular, funerary images of children preserved in mummy masks, portraits, and painted shrouds from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods illustrate the social realities of childhood in Egypt. Iconographic representations of clothing, hairstyles, jewelry, and inscriptions demonstrate not only the social status ascribed to young individuals, but also the special attention given to the commemoration of deceased children as individuals, mourned and celebrated after death by their families and wider communities. More specifically, these funerary images of children reveal how children’s bodies were utilized as symbolic foci in mortuary practice to mitigate tears in the social fabric caused by premature death. This lecture will provide further insight into the lives and deaths of children and how they were perceived by adults in Greco-Roman Egypt.
Sponsored by: AIA Society: Baltimore


Global Guide Tour: Middle East Galleries
Saturday, 22 September 2018
2:30 PM
Penn Museum , University of Pennsylvania
What better way to learn about the culture of another place than to speak to someone who grew up there? Through the Global Guides Program, the Museum offers gallery tours led by immigrants and refugees. In addition to sharing historical information about the artifacts on display, the guides combine personal experiences and stories to interpret objects from their countries of origin. *Free with Museum Admission
Sponsored by: Penn Museum


The Digital Restoration Initiative: Reading the Invisible Library
Sunday, 23 September 2018
2:00 PM
W. Brent Seales, University of Kentucky
Penn Museum , University of Pennsylvania
Digital restoration projects using non-invasive methods for reading the invisible library of Homeric manuscripts, Herculaneum material, and Dead Sea scrolls, have culminated in the reading of the text from within a damaged scroll unearthed at En- Gedi, hailed as one of the most significant discoveries in biblical archaeology of the past decade.
Sponsored by: Penn Museum, Archaeological Institute of America, Philadelphia Society


After Galen, Before Galenism: Medical Knowledge in the Early Middle Ages
Monday, 24 September 2018
3:30 PM
Meg Leja, Binghamton University
Cohen Hall 337, University of Pennsylvania
Although Galen’s status as an eminent medical authority was well known to intellectuals in early medieval Europe, this period so often labelled the “Dark Ages” lacked access to Latin translations of almost all of Galen’s writings. Few codices of any Latin medical writings survive from before the year 800, but we see a surge in the copying and production of medical manuscripts over the ninth century, within the climate of political and educational reforms carried out by Charlemagne and his successors. Even here, however, the lack of a Galenic theoretical framework has encouraged stereotypes regarding the irrational, unsystematic, and unintelligible nature of early medieval medicine—especially when set against the (roughly contemporaneous) development of Galenism in the Arabic court of Baghdad. This talk reassesses the continued dynamism of Carolingian medicine by highlighting how new experiments in religious thought offered a framework for humoral knowledge that, while it was not centered on Galenic philosophy, nevertheless established a rational basis for practice. It brings the extant medical texts from the ninth century into dialogue with Carolingian literature focused on the care of the soul and thereby suggests a way of reading medical writings as initiatives deeply implicated in the Carolingian pastoral project.
Sponsored by: Department of History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania


Vernacular Roman-ness in Byzantium
Monday, 24 September 2018
4:30 PM
Anthony Kaldellis, The Ohio State University
Scheide Caldwell House Room 103 , Princeton University
In most scholarship on Byzantium, the Roman aspects of its civilization are confined to the upper echelons of state power and court ideology. The culture of the majority, by contrast, is defined by popular Orthodoxy and the vernacular Greek language. This talk will look at aspects of vernacular Greek in Byzantium, which was called the Romaic language, and show that the idea of a Roman people went all the way down the social scale. In some ways it was stronger on the street than in the elite literature; the later, it turns out, actually down plays Roman-ness of the Byzantines. Anthony Kaldellis is a professor of Classics and chair of the Department of Classics at The Ohio State University. He has published monographs on many aspects of Byzantine history and culture, as well as many translations of Byzantine texts.
Sponsored by: Seeger Center for Hellenic Studies, Princeton University, Center for Collaborative History, Princeton University, Committee for the Study of Late Antiquity, Princeton, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University, Department of Classics, Princeton


Paleontology and Connoisseurship
Monday, 24 September 2018
5:30 PM
Carlo Ginzburg, University of California, Los Angeles.
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Class of '78 Orrery Pavilion, University of Pennsylvania
Today we regard paleontology and connoisseurship as very distant spheres of knowledge. But are they not sharing a commitment to the decipherment of clues, either natural or cultural? This somewhat speculative argument can be substantiated by two historically connected case studies, focusing on the trajectories of two friends, Petrus Camper (1722-1789) and François-Xavier de Burtin (1743-1818). The former, a well-known Dutch anatomist, was interested in painting and physiognomy. The latter, a much less known but very remakable figure, moved from the study of fossils to the study of paintings. Their relationship unveils an unknown chapter in the history of antiquarianism and connoisseurship. *This lecture is followed by a Reception **Admission is free, however we request that you kindly RSVP at the following web address: http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/lectures/rosenbachs.html
Sponsored by: Penn Libraries , University of Pennsylvania Press


Gods, Humans, Apes: Art History and Evolution
Tuesday, 25 September 2018
5:30 PM
Carlo Ginzburg, University of California, Los Angeles
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Class of '78 Orrery Pavilion, University of Pennsylvania
Georges Cuvier (1769-1832) a leading figure of French (indeed, European) science, one of the founders of comparative anatomy, called himself "a new species of antiquarian": a striking, somewhat unexpected, although not original self-definition. But to understand its implications one has to retrace a complex intellectual trajectory (which includes both Camper and Burtin) that will lead to a new image of antiquarianism and its relationship with history, implying a partial revision of Arnaldo Momigliano's great essay "Ancient History and the Antiquarian" (1950). Ultimately, this reflection will lead to a reflection on what history was, and what can become in the frail, threatened environment we live in. *Admission is free, however we request that you kindly RSVP at the following web address: http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/lectures/rosenbachs.html
Sponsored by: The Penn Libraries, University of Pennsylvania Press


The Specter of Peace: Rethinking Violence and Power in the Colonial Atlantic
Tuesday, 25 September 2018
6:00 PM
Michael Goode, Utah Valley University
Histories of peacemaking were everywhere in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, an era normally defined by slavery, warfare, and European colonization. Historian Michael Goode shows how peace in the colonial Americas was not just an absence of war, but rather a complex and contested process of violence negotiation through which European, indigenous, African peoples asserted their notions of “right ordering,” even if the desired endpoint was never fully reached. Drawing upon a wide range of archival sources at the Library Company, Goode describes peace as a specter, haunting histories of colonialism, which have largely engaged with questions of peacemaking without being explicitly aware of it. The title of the lecture refers to a co-edited volume that Michael recently published with John Smolenski (University of California, Davis). *Specter of Peace* highlights the many paths of peacemaking that otherwise have gone unexplored in early American and Atlantic World scholarship. The volume contends that historians underappreciate the importance of peace to understanding how early Americans confronted violence as a moral problem and how peacemaking shaped interactions between and among colonists, Native Americans, and people of African descent. You can find more about the volume via the publisher, Brill <https://brill.com/abstract/title/38492>. *Event is Free. RSVP here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-specter-of-peace- rethinking-violence-and-power-in-the-colonial-atlantic-tickets-49430423728 **Reception to follow at Nomad Roman, 1305 Locust St <https://maps.google.com/?q=1305+Locust+St&entry=gmail&source=g>.


Holy Modern: East, West, and the Constructs of Empire in Fascist Spain
Tuesday, 25 September 2018
6:30 PM
Maria Gonzalez Pendas, Columbia University
Schermerhorn Hall 832, Columbia University
An opaque and hovering concrete cube that opened to an interior of richly ornamented patios, the building was readily celebrated as the “the jewel” of the fair, exemplar of a refined modernism unlike much of the technological kitsch taking over the grounds of the 1964 Worlds' Fair in New York. The reception of the architecture that the dictatorial regime of Francisco Franco brought into the world scene in 1964 echoed the praise stirred by the Spanish pavilion at Expo 58 in Brussels, a gridded structure of steel and glass likewise applauded as an “unexpected gem of architecture.” Despite the formal and material discrepancies between the two buildings, both were quintessentially modern—and seemingly at odds with the fascist regime they were called to represent. As the Italian Bruno Zevi put it in 1958: “The Spanish Pavilion makes one wonder: maybe this country is no longer fascist? Or, is Franco now tired and allows artists an unusual freedom?” Fascism was of course alive and well, and architecture continued to be as crucial an instrument for its production as it had been in the 1930s across Europe. Only now the world stage was shifting under Cold War dynamics and with it the ideological configurations, images, and techniques of fascism. In this talk, I will chronicle how architects, State officials, and intellectuals worked together to redefine the cultural narrative and aesthetic register of fascism at mid-century in Spain, a project aimed at securing the regime a place within the modernizing and modernist West all the while retaining, and in many ways reinforcing the myth of empire and religious essentialism that was at the core of the Spanish radical right. The historian and Secretary of Censorship Florentino Pérez-Embid coined this two-sided ideal most fittingly as “Westernization in the means, Hispanization in the ends.” This talk will focus on the architectural strategy that Pérez-Embid proposed to project, namely, the re-inscription of the country’s Islamic past into an abstract and modernized representation of Catholicism. With this synthesis, architecture was called to perform the Spanish Reconquista and western modernization in the very same aesthetic breadth and, in doing so, to transfer a colonial campaign then definitely waning in North Africa to the realm of cultural politics. Beginning with a series of historical revisions on the architecture of Al-Andalus and the Mudejar style between 1944 and 1952 and concluding with the 1958 and 1964 pavilions, this talk follows Spanish architects in navigating the East/West, Islam/modern divide as a predicament to the regime’s imperial imagination—and a Western scene in welcoming this agenda within its ranks. María González Pendás teaches and writes in modern architectural history, with an emphasis on the politics of modernism in the second half of the twentieth century across the Iberian World. Her research reflects on the dislocations of architects’ ideologies, representation, and regimes of power; the role of language and silence in modernism and technocracy; the politics and aesthetics of labor; the intersection of architecture with processes of secularization; and the aesthetics, techniques, and buildings of fascist modes government. González Pendás received her Ph.D. in Architecture History and Theory from Columbia University in New York City, was previously trained as an architect in the Polytechnic University in Madrid, and is currently a Mellon Research Fellow in the Society of Fellows in the Humanities at Columbia University. Her academic work has received the support of the Fulbright Commission, the Temple Hoyne Buell Center, the Graham Foundation, and the Caja Madrid Foundation.
Sponsored by: Department of Art History & Archaeology, Columbia University


Acts, Facts, and Artifacts: The Stuff of Black Culture
Wednesday, 26 September 2018
5:00 PM
Kevin Young, Herman Beavers
International House Philadelphia Lightbox Film Center, University of Pennsylvania
The Wolf Humanities Center's yearlong program on Stuff kicks off with Kevin Young, award-winning poet, New Yorker editor, author of the bestselling Bunk: The Rise of Hoaxes, Humbug, Plagiarists, Phonies, Post-Facts and Fake News, and Director of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture. Dr. Young will read a piece of his recent work and then join Prof. Herman Beavers of Penn’s English and Africana Studies departments for an in-depth conversation about the varied material forms of African American culture and the challenges of preserving them. Book signing to follow.
Sponsored by: The Wolf Humanities Center


Ancient Iran in Muslim Eyes: The Fate of Persian History in the Islamic World
Wednesday, 26 September 2018
6:00 PM
Robert Hoyland, NYU
ISAW Lecture Hall, New York University
Medieval Muslim historians wishing to write about ancient Iran drew on texts that were composed in the period 750–850 bearing the title "The History of the Kings of the Persians." These works served a growing audience of well­-to­do Muslim bureaucrats and scholars of Persian ancestry who were interested in their heritage and wished to make it part of the historical outlook of the new civilization that was emerging in the Middle East, namely Islamic civilization. This talk (and the book that it is based on) explores the question of how knowledge about ancient Iran was transmitted to Muslim historians, in what forms it circulated and how it was shaped and refashioned for the new Perso­-Muslim elite that served the early Abbasid caliphs in Baghdad, a city that was built only a short distance away from the old Persian and Hellenistic capital of Seleucia­-Ctesiphon. Robert Hoyland is Professor of Late Antique and Early Islamic Middle Eastern History. He read Oriental Studies at Oxford University, where he subsequently wrote a doctoral thesis on non-Muslim accounts of the rise of Islam (Seeing Islam as Others saw it, 1997). The emergence of Islamic civilization has remained a key focus of his research and is the subject of his latest book (In God’s Path: the Arab Conquests and the Creation of an Islamic Empire, 2014). The desire to better understand this phenomenon has led him down many different avenues of study: pre-Islamic Arabia (Arabia and the Arabs, 2001), epigraphy (“The Content and Context of Early Arabic Inscriptions”, 1997), papyrology (“The earliest attestation of the Dhimma of God and His Messenger and the rediscovery of P. Nessana 77”, 2014) and the late antique Greco-Syriac world ([with Simon Swain et al.] Polemon’s Physiognomy, 2007, and Theophilus of Edessa’s Chronicle, 2011). One avenue, archaeology, has become a passion for him in its own right and he has been involved in excavations in Syria, Yemen, Israel/Palestine and Turkey/Kurdistan. He has now embarked upon the excavation of the city of Partavi/Barda‘a in modern Azerbaijan, which was the capital of the Christian kingdom of Caucasian Albania and the site of the first Muslim garrison in eastern Caucasus. The reception following this lecture will celebrate recent publications by ISAW community members, including The 'History of the Kings of the Persians' in Three Arabic Chronicles: The Transmission of the Iranian Past from Late Antiquity to Early Islam, translated with introduction and notes by Robert G. Hoyland (Liverpool: Liverpool University Press, 2018).


MEMORY AT “THE MINE OF DEATH”: CULTURAL LANDSCAPES OF ANDEAN MERCURY MINING
Thursday, 27 September 2018
12:30 PM
Douglas Smit, University of Pennsylvania
Penn Museum Classroom 2, University of Pennsylvania
Dr. Douglas K. Smit, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, considers the divergent historical narratives at the Huancavelica mercury mining complex in the Peruvian Andes, at this Penn Cultural Heritage Center-sponsored lunchtime talk. For Spanish colonial administrators, Huancavelica was the “crown jewel” of the empire due to lucrative mercury mining and technological advances in metallurgy. For indigenous Andean peoples forced to labor underground, the danger of mercury poisoning became so extreme that Huancavelica became known as “the mine of death.” Drawing from archaeological fieldwork and oral histories collected since 2013, Dr. Smit explores how the people of Santa Bárbara negotiate the development of cultural heritage in their community in concert with and sometimes counter to the narratives of government officials, outside consultants, and North American archaeologists. Brown bag lunches are welcome at this free event.
Sponsored by: Penn Museum


Prophecy against Paideia? The Third Sibylline Oracle and Jewish Literature in the Hellenistic Age
Thursday, 27 September 2018
3:30 PM
Anette Reed, NYU
Silver Center 503, New York University


The Art of Commentary
Thursday, 27 September 2018
4:30 PM
Michael Puett , Harvard University
Brower Commons A, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
This paper will explore the commentarial strategies that developed during the Han, Wei, and Jin periods. Professor Puett's goal will be to trace some of the complexities of these strategies and to discuss their larger significance.
Sponsored by: Asian Languages and Cultures, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey


Evander and the Invention of the Prehistory of Latium in Virgil’s Aeneid
Thursday, 27 September 2018
4:30 PM
Sergio Casali, University of Rome “Tor Vergata”
McCormick 106, Princeton University
Evander’s account of the past of Latium in Aeneid 8.813-36 contradicts from multiple points of view the versions of both King Latinus and the narrator as exposed in book 7. Also Aeneas’ kinship diplomacy in book 8 stands in contradiction with what he had said to King Latinus in the previous book. By representing his characters as manipulators and mythmakers, Virgil reflects on his own manipulations and his own politically interested mythmaking.


Medals and Shells: On Morphology and History, Once Again
Thursday, 27 September 2018
5:30 PM
Carlo Ginzburg, University of California, Los Angeles
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library Class of '78 Orrery Pavilion, University of Pennsylvania
Was it possible to articulate the idea of a descent of humans from big apes before Darwin? And if this has been the case, how? Through which cognitive instruments? Could either travel accounts or books dealing with political philosophy be read against the grain, playing the footnotes against the text? What is at stake is not a search for some forgotten forerunners of Darwin--an utterly useless, misleading notion--but, on the contrary, the possibility to reflect on the deep discontinuity between Darwin's project and natural history before him. From this discontinuity some visual and textual roots of contemporary racism will emerge. *Admission is free, however we request that you kindly RSVP at the following web address: http://www.library.upenn.edu/exhibits/lectures/rosenbachs.html
Sponsored by: The Penn Libraries, University of Pennsylvania Press


Nation, Narration, and Immediacy in Early Japanese Sports Broadcasting
Thursday, 27 September 2018
6:00 PM
Kerim Yasar, University of Southern California
Kent Hall 403, Columbia University
Sponsored by: Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Columbia University


Ancient Eudaimonism and Modern Morality
Friday, 28 September 2018
11:00 AM
Julia Annas , University of Arizona
When we study ancient ethics, we inevitably find ourselves thinking in terms of morality - but there are strong reasons for thinking that the ancient thinkers themselves did not have morality in their conceptual repertoire. We can deal with this by either praising or blaming the ancients for not thinking in terms of morality - or we can make use of the ancient perspective in thinking about, and investigating, morality as we understand it. In its Classical Dialogues series, the interdepartmental Classical Studies Graduate Program CLST at Columbia University invites authors of recent work in ancient studies that is exemplary for the kind of study that CLST aims to foster. All faculty and students at Columbia and beyond are cordially invited. CLST students are required to read carefully at least one chapter or article in advance and prepare questions and comments for discussion.
Sponsored by: Classical Studies Graduate Program CLST at Columbia University


Researching the Cultural History of Xiangyang through Archaeological Remains
Friday, 28 September 2018
4:30 PM
Glenda Chao, Ursinus College
Kent Hall 403, Columbia University
This paper summarizes the results of several years of study on the archaeology and history of Chu 楚expansion into the Xiangyang 襄阳 region. Focusing on a portion of archaeological evidence excavated from the cemetery site of Bianying 卞营, it outlines two conclusions regarding the nature of Chu cultural influence on the area that have significant implications for how we look at the history of early state expansion during the first millennium BCE. In doing so, it also introduces several methodological and theoretical innovations in the study of early China that can be made when semiotic interpretations of material culture are paired with quantitative data analysis and close reading of excavated and transmitted texts. *You can request Pre-circulated Paper
Sponsored by: Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Columbia University


TBA
Monday, 1 October 2018
Paraskevi Martzavou, Columbia University
Italian Academy 5th Floor Conference Room, Columbia University
Sponsored by: Center for the Ancient Mediterranean, Columbia


Slaves and Slavery in medieval India: The Smrticandrika of Devanabhatta
Wednesday, 3 October 2018
4:30 PM
Donald Davis, University of Texas at Austin
Van Pelt Library Class of ‘55 Room, University of Pennsylvania


Muhammad: Prophet of Peace Amid the Clash of Empires
Tuesday, 16 October 2018
5:30 PM
Juan Cole, University of MIchigan
Stiteler Hall B21, University of Pennsylvania
Juan Cole, Professor of History at the University of MIchigan and author and creator of award-winning blog Informed Comment discusses his new book on Mecca as a Sanctuary of Peace during the Roman-Iranian World War of the 600's. *RSVP: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/muhammad-prophet-of-peace-amid-the-clash-of-empires-tickets-50365209698?aff=utm_source%3Deb_email%26utm_medium%3Demail%26utm_campaign%3Dnew_event_email&utm_term=eventurl_text
Sponsored by: Middle East Center, University of Pennsylvania


Ancestors and Arguments in the Eastern Mediterranean: The Statue of Idrimi from Late Bronze Age Alalah/Tell Atchana
Friday, 19 October 2018
12:00 PM
Jacob Lauinger, Johns Hopkins
Penn Museum Widener Auditorium, University of Pennsylvania