Penn Calendar Penn A-Z School of Arts and Sciences University of Pennsylvania

Events & Workshops

  • Wednesday, January 22, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Room 350, Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics (133 S. 36th Street)
    Food provided / Free and open to the public

    Muira McCammon (Annenberg School for Communication)
    Tweeting and Deleting: Strategic Narratives and Impression Management by U.S. Federal Agencies (PDF)

    Ayesha Mulla (University of Chicago Dept. of Anthropology)
    Marwa Na Dena/Don’t Get Us Killed: Reporting Between the Marginal and the Military in Pakistan (PDF)

    WHEN, IF EVER, DO DEMOCRACIES PERMIT AND ENCOURAGE THE DELETION of posts on government social media accounts? In a qualitative study employing Freedom of Information Act requests, MUIRA MCCAMMON traces what different federal agencies removed from their Twitter feeds during the Obama and Trump administrations. By putting the records of deleted tweets in conversation with federal agencies’ internal emails and statements to the U.S. press, she examines the informal decisions made by government social media managers and teases apart the communicative strategies that governmental institutions have employed in their tweeting and deleting. She argues that the Federal Records Act in its ambiguity has begotten an informational environment wherein certain types of governmental deletion are dramatically hyped by journalists, while others remain undocumented and left in the government’s archival backstage. This is ultimately about the challenge of tracing these behaviors over time and the ways in which Freedom of Information Act requests can reveal patterns in information disappearance and erasure on corporate social media platforms.

    SEVENTEEN YEARS AFTER THE DEREGULATION OF THE MASS MEDIA in Pakistan, private news channels have established themselves as powerful players on the political spectrum, drawing both awe and disdain for their blistering critiques of politicians combined with their race for ratings. Despite their insistence on the “independent” nature of the electronic media, news media professionals are highly attentive to the ways in which their work remains bounded in general by the state. Based on a series of in-depth interviews, AYESHA MULLA examines the politics of media censorship in democratic Pakistan as the authority of television news journalism becomes increasingly destabilized. She analyzes the ways in which the shadow of the deep state featured in her dissertation fieldwork among news media professionals in Karachi and Islamabad. She focuses on the shifts in tone, the anxious laughter and the lengthy pauses that verbose journalists adopted when they would perform an inarticulate critique of the military. Such enactments rest upon the very real dangers of straying past the limits of investigative inquiry in Pakistan, particularly when presented with the fate of their colleagues pursuing critical leads on military activities.

  • Thursday, January 23, 2020 - 5:00pm to 6:30pm

    133 S. 36th Street, Room 250 (The Forum)
    Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics
    Free and open to the public / Food provided

    PLEASE REGISTER HERE

    EVEN AS IT SEEKS TO ENTER THE 2020 ELECTION united around the goal of defeating President Trump, the Democratic Party is working through longstanding issues of policy, politics, and identity during the primaries. How has (or hasn't) race factored into these debates so far, and how might it affect the ultimate selection of a nominee? JAMELLE BOUIE, who has been a thoughtful commentator on the intersection of race and politics through several election cycles, leads what promises to be a far-ranging conversation on these and other issues surrounding the 2020 elections.

    JAMELLE BOUIE, based in Charlottesville, Virginia and Washington D.C., is a columnist for the New York Times and political analyst for CBS News. He covers campaigns, elections, national affairs, and culture. Prior to the Times, he was chief political correspondent for Slate magazine. And before that, he was a staff writer at The Daily Beast and held fellowships at The American Prospect and The Nation magazine.

    This event is part of the Mitchell Center's RACE & POLITICS Series, a partnership with The Black Graduate and Professional Student Association (BGAPSA).

    PLEASE REGISTER HERE

  • Thursday, January 23, 2020 - 7:00pm to 8:30pm

    133 S. 36th Street, Auditorium (Lower Level)
    Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics
    Free and open to the public / Food provided

    PLEASE REGISTER HERE

    Co-sponsored by the  Pi Sigma Alpha Political Science Honor Society and the Penn Wharton Public Policy Initiative.

    JOIN THE PENN POLITICAL UNION as its five political parties and guest Jamelle Bouie debate the resolution, “The Trump Administration's immigration policies are rooted in racist ideology.”

    THE PENN POLITICAL UNION (PPU) is an undergraduate organization formed in 2014 that features parliamentary-style deliberation on urgent contemporary issues. To represent a wide spectrum of political opinion, students are members of five different political parties: libertarian, conservative, independent, liberal, and progressive.

     

    JAMELLE BOUIE, based in Charlottesville, Virginia and Washington D.C., is a columnist for the New York Times and political analyst for CBS News. He covers campaigns, elections, national affairs, and culture. Prior to the Times, he was chief political correspondent for Slate magazine. And before that, he was a staff writer at The Daily Beast and held fellowships at The American Prospect and The Nation magazine.

    PLEASE REGISTER HERE

  • Thursday, January 30, 2020 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

    Forum (Room 250), Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics
    Map Accessibility / Refreshments Provided

    SAMUEL MOYN is Henry R. Luce Professor of Jurisprudence at Yale Law School and Professor of History at Yale University. His areas of interest in legal scholarship include international law, human rights, the law of war, and legal thought, in both historical and current perspective. In intellectual history, he has worked on a diverse range of subjects, especially twentieth-century European moral and political theory. He has written several books in his fields of European intellectual history and human rights history, including The Last Utopia: Human Rights in History (2010), and edited or coedited a number of others. His most recent books are Christian Human Rights (2015, based on Mellon Distinguished Lectures at the University of Pennsylvania in fall 2014) and Not Enough: Human Rights in an Unequal World (2018). He is currently working on a new book on the origins and significance of humane war for Farrar, Straus, and Giroux. Over the years he has written in venues such as Boston Review, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Dissent, The Nation, The New Republic, the New York Times, and the Wall Street Journal.

  • Tuesday, February 4, 2020 - 6:00pm to 7:30pm

    College Hall, 4th Floor (Philomathean Society)
    Food provided / Free and open to the public

    CONSPIRACY THEORIES ARE AS OLD AS POLITICS. But conspiracists today have introduced something new—conspiracy without theory. And the new conspiracism has moved from the fringes to the heart of government with the election of Donald Trump. Classic conspiracy theory insists that things are not what they seem and gathers evidence—especially facts ominously withheld by official sources—to tease out secret machinations. The new conspiracism is different. There is no demand for evidence, no dots revealed to form a pattern, no close examination of shadowy plotters. Dispensing with the burden of explanation, the new conspiracism imposes its own reality through repetition (exemplified by the Trump catchphrase “a lot of people are saying”) and bare assertion (“rigged!”). The new conspiracism targets democratic foundations—political parties and knowledge-producing institutions. It makes it more difficult to argue, persuade, negotiate, compromise, and even to disagree. Ultimately, it delegitimates democracy.

    NANCY ROSENBLUM is the Harvard University Senator Joseph Clark Professor of Ethics in Politics and Government emerita. Her field of research is historical and contemporary political thought. She is Co-Editor of the Annual Review of Political Science and co-author, with Russell Muirhead, of A Lot of People Are Saying: The New Conspiracism and the Assault on Democracy.

  • Wednesday, February 19, 2020 - 12:00pm to 1:30pm

    Room 350, Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics (133 S. 36th Street)
    Food provided / Free and open to the public

    Hajer Al-Faham (Penn Political Science)
    “Contingent Citizenship: Muslims in America”

    Mo Torres (Harvard Dept. of Sociology)
    “The Undeserving City: Policy Elites, Race-Class Subjugation, and the Moral Worthiness of Place”

  • Thursday, February 20, 2020 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

    Forum (Room 250), Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics
    Map Accessibility / Refreshments Provided

    JASON DEPARLE is a reporter for The New York Times and has written extensively about poverty and immigration. His book, American Dream: Three Women, Ten Kids, and a Nation’s Drive to End Welfare, was a New York Times Notable Book and won the Helen Bernstein Award from the New York City Library. He was an Emerson Fellow at New America. He is a recipient of the George Polk Award and is a two-time finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His new book, A Good Provider Is One Who Leaves: One Family and Migration in the 21st  Century, follows a Filipino family over three decades as they migrate to new lands and will themselves into a new global middle class.

  • Thursday, March 19, 2020 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

    Forum (Room 250), Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics
    Map Accessibility / Refreshments Provided

    KIMBERLY NOBLE is a neuroscientist and board-certified pediatrician, and director of the Neurocognition, Early Experience and Development (NEED) lab. She and her team study how socioeconomic inequality relates to in children's cognitive and brain development.  Her work examines socioeconomic disparities in cognitive development, as well as brain structure and function, across infancy, childhood and adolescence. She is particularly interested in understanding how early in infancy or toddlerhood such disparities develop; the modifiable environmental differences that account for these disparities; and the ways we might harness this research to inform the design of interventions. Along with a multidisciplinary team from around the country, with funding from NIH and a consortium of foundations, she is currently leading the first clinical trial of poverty reduction to assess the causal impact of income on children’s cognitive, emotional and brain development in the first three years of life.

  • Thursday, April 16, 2020 - 4:30pm to 6:00pm

    Forum (Room 250), Ronald O. Perelman Center for Political Science and Economics
    Map Accessibility / Refreshments Provided

    ROB REICH is professor of political science and, by courtesy, professor of philosophy and at the Graduate School of Education, at Stanford University. He is the director of the Center for Ethics in Society and co-director of the Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society (publisher of the Stanford Social Innovation Review), both at Stanford University. He is the author most recently of Just Giving: Why Philanthropy is Failing Democracy and How It Can Do Better (2018) and Philanthropy in Democratic Societies: History, Institutions, Values (edited with Chiara Cordelli and Lucy Bernholz, 2016). He is also the author of several books on education: Bridging Liberalism and Multiculturalism in American Education (2002) and Education, Justice, and Democracy (edited with Danielle Allen, 2013). His current work focuses on ethics, public policy, and technology, and he serves as associate director of the Human-Centered Artificial Intelligence initiative at Stanford. He is a board member of the magazine Boston Review and at the Spencer Foundation.