Anthropology Course Register

Browse the Penn Anthropology Course Register

This list shows all of the Penn Anthropology Courses that are currently being taught or have been taught recently.

Visit the official Penn Course Register site to download a PDF of the information below.

001. Introduction to Archaeology. (C) History & Tradition Sector. All classes. Staff.

Anintroduction to the history, concepts, and methods oftheanthropological study of pre-historic and historic peoples using archaeological illustrations toindicate the relationship ofarchaeological interpretationswith cultural and physical anthropology.

002. INTRODUCTIONTO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY. (C) Society Sector. All classes. Staff.

Anintroduction to the study of culture and human institutions, how they change, and their role inboth literate and nonliterate societies.

003. Introduction to Human Evolution. (C) Living World Sector. All classes. Staff.

Howdid humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-humanprimates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens.Firstwe cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation.We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys andapes)can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecologicaldiversity seen among living primates. We concludethe course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestorsto the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, toconduct hands-on exercises collectingand analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data onbothhumans and nonhuman primates and working with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts.

004.The Modern World and Its Cultural Background. (B) Humanities & Social Science Sector. Class of 2010 & beyond. Urban.

Anintroduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity:ethnicities, religions, languages, politicalforms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations".Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, inwhich we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attentionto the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context.

L/R 005. Great Transformations. (C) History & Tradition Sector. All classes. Ristvet.

Thiscourse explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agricultureto the industrial revolution.Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop?Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, includingthe landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economicchange from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition,students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum and an opportunity to do some experimental archaeology during recitations.

L/R012. (HIST012, SOCI012) Globalization And Its Historical Significance. (C) Humanities& Social Science Sector. Class of 2010 & beyond. Spooner.

Thiscourse describes and analysesthe current state of globalization and sets itinhistorical perspective. It applies the conceptsand methods of anthropology, history, politicaleconomy and sociology to the analysis and interpretationof what is actually happeningin the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization.Wefocus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasingawareness. Inanswering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization)and the unplanned diffusion of new ways oforganizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensionsof globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, politicaland cultural development of various parts of the modern world.

The course istaught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensionsof globalization:economic, political,social and cultural.

022. (AFRC050,AFST050, FOLK022, MUSC050) World Music and Cultures.(A) Arts& Letters

Sector. All Classes. Muller, Rommen,Sykes. Open to all students

Thiscourse examines how we asconsumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largelythrough the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in  a  variety  of ways--  par ticularly as  traditions in  transformation. Students  gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningfulperson-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it isremoved, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumersof "World Music" by telling aseries of stories about particular recordings made with, or usingthe music of, peoplesculturally and geographically distant from the US. Studentscome to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of productionand consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process.

SM 055. (NELC033) CulturalHeritage, Politics and War in the Middle East. (M) al Kuntar.

Political upheaval in the Middle East has brought cultural heritage studies to the forefront. From playing a role in the making of national identity and economy of Middle Eastern countries to falling prey to armed conflicts, cultural heritage remains an important element of the political and social scene. This seminar will examine the relatedness of cultural heritage to questionsof identity and politics in the Middle East, and the impact of recent wars on such heritage.Theseminar will start by outliningthe ancient and modern history of the Middle East, and reviewing the productionof cultural heritage and its contemporary managementin several Middle Eastern countries. It will then proceed to discuss the following major topics:

1)Cultural diversity of modern Middle Eastern societies, the perception of cultural heritage in thesesocieties, and the survival of long-living historical places, old traditions,and material culture of all kinds. 2) The influenceof ancient cultureson common fixationand beliefs of modern identity in Middle Eastern societies(e.g. particular ethnic and religiousgroup see themselves as direct descendents of one or a number of ancient groups such as Phoenicians, Israelites, Assyrians). 3)Theuse of archeological and historical data tocreate narratives of the past that promote specific political ideologies in the modern Middle East and, in some cases fabricate novel cultural and political realities.

4)The damage done to Cultural Heritage by recent wars in Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon, and (i) how these wars are/were the makers of a new time that disrupted the living past through the destruction of cultural landscapes;and(ii) the involvement of cultural heritage institutions and archaeologists in rescuing cultural heritage in the event of war.

SM086. Desire and Demand: Culture and Consumption in the Global Marketplace. (M) Diggs- Thompson. Freshman Seminar

Doesconsumption shape culture or does culture shape consumption? As even the most mundane purchase becomes sociallysymbolic and culturally meaningfulwe can persuasively argue that the concept of "need" has been transformed.Analyzing a variety of physical and virtual consumer venues,the goal of this seminar is to understand and to analyze historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. We investigatesocial and political-economic factors that impact when and how people purchase goods and argue that behavior attached to consumption includes a nexus of influencesthat may change periodicallyin response to external factors. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and require a critical analysis of global/local linkages. The city of Philadelphia becomes the seminar'slaboratory as we ask how have issues of culture, consumption, and global capitalism become intertwined around the world?

100.(ANTH654, NELC281, NELC681, SAST161)Topics In Anthropology and the Modern World: Afghanistan, Iran, Pakistan. (B) Spooner.

Thiscourse relates anthropological models and methods to current problems in the Modern World. The overall objective is to show how the research findings and analytical concepts of anthropology may be used toilluminate and explain events as they have unfolded in the recent news and in the course of the semester. Eachedition of the course will focus on a particular country or region that has been in the news.

106. Anthropological Genetics.(M) Schurr.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 003.

Thiscourse explores the use of genetics tounderstand human biological variation and evolution. Among the areas ofgenetics to be explored are dermatoglyphics (fingerprints), craniometrics (skulls and teeth), anthropometrics (body dimensions), simple Mendelian traits, moleculargenetics, genetics of complex traits (skin color, height, obesity),population genetics, and disease adaptations.

SM 103. (ANTH630) Empires:From Akkad to America.(C) Ristvet.

Empireshave been an enduring phenomenon for more than 4,000 years, from the rise of Akkad in Mesopotamia to the American invasion in Iraq.How and why do empires emerge? How do empires work? Why do empires endure (or collapse)?This class will study the origins, structures and consequences of imperialism by comparing ancient and modern empires from all over the world. In addition to astudyof the politicalaspects of imperialism, we will analyze the cultural and economic facets of imperialism, particularly acculturation, cultural hybridity and issues of identity. We will analyze a wide-range of data, including art and artifacts from the Penn Museum, administrative and historical records, novels and films.Empires covered may include Egypt, Assyria, Achaemenid Persia, Rome, Han China, Sassanian Persia, the Abbasid Caliphate, theMongols, Mughal India,Mali, Inka, Aztec, Spain, Ottoman, France and America.

104. (BIBB150, GSWS103)Sex and Human Nature.(C) Living World Sector. All classes. SCHURR. This is an introduction to the scientific study of sex in humans. Within an evolutionary framework, the

courseexamines genetic, physiological, ecological, social and behavioral aspects ofsex in humans. After providing the basic principles of evolutionary biology, the course will examine the development of sexual anatomy and physiology. How is sex determined? How is orgasm achieved? Why do girls and boys develop sexually at different ages?Therole of ecology and social life in shaping human mating patterns will be evaluated throughthe use of ethnographiesand cross-cultural materials on a variety of human cultures. Does everybody have sex the way we do?Why marry? Are there biological bases for love? Why do we experience jealousy? Finally, topics relevant to human sexuality today will be discussed, such as recreational sex, contraception, and sexually transmitted diseases. Examples are drawn primarily from traditionaland modern human societies; data from studies of nonhuman primates are also considered.

105. Human Adaptation. (C) Monge.

ANTH105 explores the evolutionary process using humans (Homo sapiens)as a case study. This complex biologicaland cultural species isbestunderstood within the framework of evolution as it has operated for over a billion years.Learn why humans are imperfect, not an end product of evolutionary change, and are still evolving with unpredictable consequences. Using3 complexes that have come to characterize humans (bipedalism, rotary chewers, and bigbrains) we will trace theevolutionary history from the first life forms on earth to the human lineage that emerged in just the last 5 million years. The consequences for humans of this evolutionary history are profound and we witness this everyday in our own bodies. Touch fossil casts representing the whole of human evolution using the Penn Museum's prodigiouscasting program.

116. (AFRC116, LALS116) CaribbeanCulture and Politics.(M) Thomas.

Thiscourse offers anthropological perspectives on the Caribbean as ageo-political and socio-cultural region, and on contemporary Caribbean diaspora cultures. We will examine how the region's long and diverse colonial history has structured relationships between race, ethnicity, class, gender and power, as well as how people have challengedthese structures. As a region in which there have been massive transplantations of peoples and their culturesfrom Africa, Asia, and Europe, and upon which the United States has exerted considerable influence, we will question the processesby which the meeting and mixing of peoples and cultures has occurred.Course readings include material on the political economy ofslavery and the plantation system,family and community life, religiousbeliefs and practices, gender roles and ideologies, popular culture, and the differing ways national, ethnic, and racial identities are expressedon the islands and throughoutthe Caribbean diaspora.

121. (NELC103, URBS121)Origin and Culturesof Cities. (A) History & TraditionSector. All classes.Zettler.

TheUN estimates that 2.9 of the world's 6.1 billion people live in cities and that this percentageis rapidly increasing in many parts of the world. This course examines urban life and urban problems by providinganthropological perspectives on this distinctive form of human association and land use. First we will examine the "origin"of cities, focusing on several of the places where cities first developed, including Mesopotamia and the Valley of Mexico. We will then investigate the internal structure of non- industrial cities by looking atcasestudies from around the world and from connections between the cities of the past and the city in which we live and work today.

122. Becoming Human. (C)Natural Science & Mathematics Sector. Class of 2010 and beyond. Staff. Human evolutionary studies is a composite product of the fieldwork of both Paleolithicarchaeology

andhuman paleontology (or what we refer to as "stones and bones").Thismarriage of two subdisciplines of anthropology producesa unique set of data that isintellectually managed and driven by theories within anthropology as a whole and even beyond --tofields such asbiology, psychology, and primate ethology, as we try to understand the origins oflanguage, culture, and our unique physical characteristics.In this course, we will jointly discuss and debate the actual evidence of human evolution, describing what the actual evidence isand exploring how far can we take these interpretations.

139.(NELC182, URBS139) Ancient Civilizations of the World. (M) History& Tradition Sector. All classes. Zettler.

Thearchaeology of the complex societiesof the Old and New Worlds from the end of the Paleolithic up to and including the earliest civilizations.

123. (COMM110) Communication& Culture. (C) Society Sector. All classes. Agha.

Thecourse looks at varieties of human expression -- such as art, film, language and song --as communicative practices that connect persons together to form a common culture.Discussion is centered around particular case studies and ethnographic examples.Examination of communicative practices interms of the types ofexpressive signs they employ, their capacity to formulate and transmit cultural beliefs and ideals (such as conceptions of politics, nature, and self), and todefine the size and characteristics of groups and communitiessharing such ideals. Discussion of the role of media, social institutions, and technologies of communication(print, electronic).Emphasis on contemporary communicative practicesand the forms of culturethat emerge in the modern world.

SM 133. (LALS133) Native Peoples and the Environment. (M) Erickson. FreshmanSeminar

Therelationship between the activities of native peoples and the environment isa complex and contentiousissue. One perspective argues that native peoples had little impact on the environment because of their low population densities, limited technology, and conservation ethic and worldview.At the other extreme,biodiversity, nature itself, is considered the product of a long history of human activities. This seminar will examinethe myth of the ecologically noble savage, the myth of the pristine environment,the alliance between native peoples and green politics, and the contribution of native peoples to appropriate technology, sustainable developmentand conservation of biodiversity.

141. (ARTH141, COMM141)Public Policy, Museums,and the Ethics of Cultural Heritage. (A)

Leventhal.

Thiscourse will focus upon and examine the ethics ofinternationalheritage and the role that Museums play in the preservation of identity and cultural heritage. The mission of this course will be to inform and educate students about the role of Museums within the 21st century. What is the role and position ofantiquities and important cultural objects inMuseums? How should Museums acquire these objects and when should they be returned to countries and cultural groups? Examples from current issues will be includedin the reading and discussions along with objects and issues within the Penn Museum.

143. Being Human: Biology, Culture & Human Diversity. (C) Staff.

This course is an exploration of human biologyfrom an evolutionary and biocultural perspective. Under this light, the class will provide you with general concepts for a better understanding of what it means to be human.Wewill see humans as mammals, as primates, and as hominids. We will explore the basics of human genetics, growth & development, nutrition, disease and life history. Biological variation in contemporary and past societies will be reviewed in reference to evolutionary processes.

L/R 148. (CLST148, NELC183) Food and Fire: Archaeologyin the Laboratory. Humanities & Social

Science Sector. Class of 2010 & beyond. Katherine Moore.

Thiscourse will let students explore theessential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environmentfrom the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resourcesaround them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum'snew Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum'scollections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions willinclude discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-onexperience in the laboratory.

SM151. (ANTH752) Archaeologyof American History. (C) History & Tradition Sector. All classes. Schuyler.

Overthe last fifty years archaeologists have been exploring historic sites in the United States dating from both the ColonialPeriod and the 19th/20th centuries. What can archaeology now tell us about the origins of American society, the invasion of North America by various Europeanpeoples (Spanish, English,Dutch), the impact on nativepeoples, the rise ofAfrican American and Asian American cultures, major crisis (e.g. the revolution, Civil War, and the Great Depression), the settlement of the Far American West, and the final emergenceof a truly national culture in the 20th century? A basic question will be how an American history based on both archaeology and archival sources isdifferent and more complete than an image of the past drawn only from written sources.

158.The Neolithic Revolution.(M) Olszewski.

Theadvent of food production/agriculture in prehistory, sometimes referred toas the "Neolithic Revolution," represents key economic, social, and biological transitions for human groups.Food production was characterized bythe possibility for the accumulation offood surpluses, which could be used as a form of wealth.It also resulted in the reorganization of social and ritual life as people settled more permanently in villages or were involved in pastoral lifeways.Additionally, densely packed living conditionsand a close association with domesticated animals led to the spread of diseases, and new forms of labor relatedto farming tasks, as well as diets focused on a narrower range of foods, created biological stresses in these populations. This course examinesseveral examples of the "Neolithic Revolution" throughout theworld, including theMiddle East, China,Europe, Mesoamerica, South America, and the North American Southwest.

199.Independent Study in Anthropology. (C) Staff.Prerequisite(s):Junior or senior standingand written permission of instructor and undergraduatechair. See Department for Advisor

Astudy under faculty supervision of a problem area or topic not included in the formal curriculum.

160. (CINE106) Mythology and the Movies.(M) Krasniewicz.

Mythsare powerful symbolic stories that shape how we interpret, feel about and actuponthe world around us. They have been important throughout time and across cultures for the help they give humans as they make their way through social interactions of all kinds. Traditionalmythological subjects of creations,hero quests, and gods and monsters are found in all the non-Western, non- industrial cultures that anthropologists study. But we can also see similar tales in our own contemporary American culture, especiallyin the form of blockbuster movies. This course looks at popular Hollywood movies as a form of mythologythat people use to interpret, organize and make sense of the world around them. We will be applyingtheories from anthropology and mythologyas well asanalyzing the incorporation ofmovie mythology into everyday life through fan culture, merchandise, advertising and related media.

SM 184. Food and Culture. (M) Kauer, J.

Inthis seminar we will explore the various relationships between food and culture.Readings will draw from a range of fields aside from anthropology, includingpsychology, food studies, history, nutrition, and sociology. We will read about and discuss cross-cultural variation in food habits, the meanings underlying eating and food in the United States, and the different ways that individuals construct 'self' and identity through food and eating. Discussion in class will rely on in-depth reading, analysis, and discussion of the assignedtexts. There will be a few short writing assignments throughout the class. In addition, students will conduct interviews and then write a paper based on both these and research in the published literature.

190. (AFRC190, AFST190) Introduction to Africa. (A) Society Sector. All classes. Hasty.

During the semesterwe will focus on people and communities of sub-Saharan Africa and on the ways people represent,reflect on, and react to various aspects and issues in their lives and the institutions which dominate their communities. We will focus particularly on the history, contemporary expression, and inter-relationships among politics, religion,and aesthetic practice. Members of Penn's African Studies community will share their expertise with the class and introduce theUniversity'sAfrica resources. Texts consist of weekly readings, films, and recordings;and class members will be expected to attend several lecturesoutside of class.

210. Death: Anthropological Perspectives. (M) Monge.

Thiscourse will cover the topic of DEATH from a bio/cultural perspective includingthe evolution of life history (aging and demography - mortality) as well as from an archaeological perspective (prehistory) and early history of mortuary practices. Nothing in the lifespan of humans is so revealing on the interface of culture and biology as is death and the experience of death. This course is not concerned specifically with how an individualexperiences death, but intheways that culture and biology have come to define and deal with physical death and the death experience.

218. (EALC018) Globalizing East Asia. (M) Kim.

This course explores the changingculture and society ofChina, South Korea, and Japan and analyzes the reactions of ordinary people to these changes. Our course discussion begins with a critical investigation into traditional societies based onpatriarchy, Confucian ethics, and subsistence agricultureand how they have changed since their initialencounters with expandingglobal capitalism. This course then examines how the recently intensifying transnational movements ofcapital, commodities, people, and "cultures" have created particular cultural and societal forms in the region. Drawing on ethnographic, historical, and politicalliterature about the three countries, students can understand how the particular culture and economy ofeachcountry has contributed to creating different paths of their historical-cultural transformations. Our topics include: changes in traditional families and gender roles, internationalwars and massive modernization movements;corporate culture and its local variations;domestic and international labor migration and the conditions of migrant workers;international marriages and transnational flow of brides; US-based fast food restaurants and food crisis; emerging consumerism and commodification of childhood; "odorless" Japanese cultural products and their popularity in Asian countries.

SM 219. (ANTH719)Archaeology Field Project. (A) Humanities & Social ScienceSector. Class of

2010 & beyond. Schuyler. Permission of instructor required

First-handparticipation inresearch project inhistorical archaeology inSouthern New Jersey. Transportation provided by the university. Students will assist in excavations and archival research on local archaeological sites. Class is open to all undergraduates, no previous archaeological experience is required. Attendance will involve Fridays or Saturdays, all day from 8:00 to 5:00 includingtravel time to the excavations and back to the University Museum. Studentsenroll for only one day (F or S). Enrollment is limited so specific permission of the instructor is required (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215)898-6965; U Museum 412). A follow up laboratory course (Anth 220 in the spring semester) will also beavailable during which the artifacts and documentary sources collectedin the fall will be analyzed at the University Museum.Course may be repeatedfor credit.

228. (EALC037) Chinese Culture and Society.(M) Kim.

Thiscourse investigates diverse aspects ofChinese culture and society inthepast and the present. Our discussionwill begin bycriticallyexamining the alleged common characteristics of traditional Chinese culture and society, such as patrilineal kinship and Confucian ethics. For the Maoist era, we willdiscuss theimpacts of the radical socialistmovements, such asGreat Leap Forward and Cultural Revolution, on local communities, families,and individuals. Later we will analyze the increasingly complex cultural and social landscapes of the Post-Mao China: How did the one-child policy contribute to the rediscovery ofchildhood and the emerging consumer culture inChina? Have the new job opportunities created by the socialistmarket economy improved women's status? What are the effects of multinational corporations on local communities? How can we explain the relation between the creation of social stigma and infectiousdiseases such as AIDS?

220.(ANTH720) Archaeology Laboratory Field Project. (B) Humanities& Social Science Sector. Class of 2010 & beyond. Schuyler.

Follow-upfor Anthropology 219. Studentsmay enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collectedon Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No   previous   archaeological   or   lab   exper ience   is   required.   (Rober t   L.   Schuyler : schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.

221. (ANTH521,ARTH230, CLST244, NELC284, NELC584) Material World in Archaeological

Science. (M) Boileau/Dibble.

Byfocusing on the scientificanalysis of inorganic archaeological materials, this course will explore processesof creation in the past. ANTH 221 will take place in the new Center for the Analysisof Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and will be team taught in three modules: analysis of lithics, analysis of ceramics and analysis of metals. Each module will combine laboratory and classroomexercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how the transformation ofmaterials intoobjects provides key information about past human behaviors and the socio-economic contexts of production, distribution, exchange and use.Discussion topics will include invention and adoption of new technologies, change and innovation, use offire, and craft specialization.

223. (ANTH523) Indigenous Archaeology. (M) Staff.

This seminar is an introduction to Indigenous archaeologies. These approacheshave been definedas archaeology "with, for and by Indigenouspeoples." However, they are in fact more than this. Not only do they seek to make archaeology more representative ofand responsible to Indigenous communities.They also seek to contribute to a more accurate understanding of the archaeological record through the incorporation of Native epistemologies. This course covers such topics as the history of American archaeology, indigenousknowledge and cultural values, NAGPRA, museumification, decolonizing methodologies, and current debates.

230. (ANTH633, CRIM230) ForensicAnthropology. (M) Monge.

Thiscourse will investigateand discuss the various techniques ofanalysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysisof life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations offorensic anthropology and the application ofDNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.

231. (CINE231)Anthropology and the Cinema. (M) Humanities & Social Science Sector. Class of

2010 & beyond. Krasniewicz.

This course analyzes mass-market American films using traditionalanthropological theories about symbolism, ritual, mythology, language, metaphor, narrative, and discourse. The goal is to think of the movies as significant cultural artifacts that we use tomakesense of the world rather than as just forms of entertainment or art. Through a study of popular American films and their related merchandise and cultural influences, we will also see how anthropology can be used to study contemporary cultures.

236. (ANTH636, NELC241, NELC641, URBS236) Iraq: Ancient Cities & Empires.(M) Zettler.

Thiscourse surveys the cultural traditions of ancient Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, aregion commonly dubbed "cradle of civilization" or "heartland of cities," from an archaeological perspective. It will investigate the emergence of sedentismand agriculture;early villages and increasingly complex Neolithicand Chalcolithic cultures; the evolution of urban, literate societies in the late 4th millennium; the city-states and incipient supra-regional politiesof the third and second millennium;the gradual emergenceof the Assyrian and Babylonian "world empires," well- known from historical books of the Bible, in the first millennium; and the cultural mix of Mesopotamia under the successive dominationof Greeks, Persians and Arabs. The course  seeks to foster an appreciation of the rich cultural heritage of ancient Mesopotamia, an  understanding  of cultural continuities in the Middle East and a sense of the ancient Near Eastern underpinnings of western civilization. No Prerequisite.

L/R 238. (HSOC238)Introduction to Medical Anthropology. (C) Humanities & Social Science

Sector. Class of 2010 & beyond. Barg.

Introductionto Medical Anthropology takes central concepts in anthropology -- culture, adaptation, human variation, belief, politicaleconomy, the body -- and applies them tohuman health and illness. Students explore key elementsof healing systems includinghealing technologies and healer-patient relationships. Modern day applications for medical anthropology are stressed.

248. Food and Feasting:Archaeology of the Table. (C) Moore.

Foodsatisfies human needs on many levels. Anth 248 explores the importance of food in human experience, starting with the nutritional and ecological aspectsof food choice and going on to focus on the social and ritual significance of foods and feasts. Particular attentionwill be paid to the way that archaeologists and biological anthropologists find out about food use in the past. Contemporary observations about the central significance of eating as a social activity will be linked to the development of cuisines, economies, and civilizations in ancient times. The course will use lectures, discussions, films, food tastings, and fieldwork to explore the course themes. An optional community service component will be outlinedduring the first week of class.

244. Disease and Human Evolution.(M) Schurr.

Thiscourse will explore the role played by disease in human evolution, from the emergence of the human lineage to the present day. We will evaluate both infectious and non-infectious diseases, and examine the way in which populations and disease organisms have co-evolved. Related issues to be explored include thenature of the virulence and pathogenicity of infectious agents, and the impact of vaccination on pathogen evolution.In addition,we will discuss the epidemiological transition and the rise of complex diseases of modernization (e.g.,diabetes, cancer) that has occurred in the past several centuries.Overall, the course will provide a broader understanding of the influence of disease processeson the evolutionof the human species.

SM 246.(ANTH649) Molecular Anthropology. (C) Schurr.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 003, Intro to Human

Evolution; some background in biology and genetics will also be useful.

Inthis course, we will explore the molecularrevolution in biologicalanthropology, and, in particular, examine the nature and theory ofcollecting molecular data toaddress anthropological questions concerning human origins, evolution and biologicalvariation. Some of the topics to be covered in this course are the phylogenetic relationships among primates, kinship inapes and monkeys, the hominoidtrichotomy, modern human origins and migrations, Neandertal genetics, biogeneticsof skin color, disease adaptations, and the Human Genome Project.

247. (ANTH747) Archaeology Laboratory Field Project-Summer. (L) Schuyler.

Thiscourse is a summer version of Anth 220 (see that course for full description). In summer more emphasis will be placed on field visitations. Course open to all students; no instructor permission needed. Course may be repeated for credit and students may take both anth 247 and 220. Questions: contactRobert L Schuyler; schuyler@sas.upen.edu; (215) 898-6965; Univ Museum 412/6398.

SM 249. Evolutionary Medicine. (C) Schurr.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 003 and ANTH 143 (or permissionfor undergraduates).

Evolutionary medicine is the application if modern evolutionary theory to studies of health and disease in humans. In taking this approach,the course will explore the roles played by disease in human evolution, and investigateboth the proximate and evolutionary explanations for them. We will examine both infectious and non-infectious diseases, and assess the way in which populationsand disease organismshave co-evolved.Related issues to be examined are the nature of the virulence and pathogenicity of infectious agents, and their efforts to subvert the immune system's responses to infection. In addition, we will explore the evolved responsesthat enable individuals to protect, heal and recuperate themselves from infections and injuries, such asfever and sickness behavior, and the fitness enhancing aspects of these processes. Finally, we will investigatehow past adaptations of early humans totheir environments now affects modern humans, who have very different diets, life expectancy, activitypatterns, and hygiene than their ancestors.

SM 252. (URBS352)Food Habits in Philadelphia Communities: Exploring Eating and Changing

Food Habits in Philadelphia Middle Schools. (C) Kauer.

In this course, Penn undergraduates will explore and examine food habits, the intersection of culture, family, history, and the various meaningsof food and eating, by working with a middle-school class in the Philadelphia public schools. The goal of the course will be to learn about the food habits of a diverse local community, toexplore that community's history of food and eating, and to consider ways and means for understanding and changing food habits. Middle school students will learn about the food environment and about why culture matters when we talk about food. Topics include traditional and modern foodways, ethnic cuisinein America, food preferences,and 'American cuisine'. The course integrates classroom work about food cultureand anthropological practice withfrequent trips to middle schools where undergraduates will collaborate with students, their teachers, and a teacher partner from the Agatson Urban Nutrition Initiative (UNI). Students will be requiredto attend one of two time blocks each week to fulfill the service learning requirement- Mondays orWednesdays 3-6pm for the Spring 2015 semester.

Undergraduateswill be responsible for weekly writing assignments responding tolearning experience in the course, for preparing materials touse with middleschool children, for being participant-learners with the middle school children and for a final research project. The material for the course will address theideas underlying university-community engagement, therelationships that exist between food/eating and culture, and research methods.

SM 254. (LALS254) Archaeologyof the Inca. (M) History & Tradition Sector. All classes. Erickson.The Inca created a vast and powerful South American empire in the high Andes Mountainsthat was

finallyconquered by Spain. Using Penn's impressive museum collections and other archaeological, linguistic, and historical sources, this course will examine Inca religionand worldview, architecture, sacred temples, the capital of Cuzco, ritual calendar, ceque system, textiles, metalworking, economic policies and expansionist politics from the dual perspectives of Inca rulers and their subjects.Our taskis to explain the rise, dominance, and fall of the Incas as a major South American civilization.

267. (ANTH567,CLST268, CLST568, NELC286, NELC586) Living World in Archaeological

Science. (M) Kassabaum, Monge, Moore.

Byfocusing on the scientificanalysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroomexercises to give students hands- on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

258. (CIS 106, LALS268)Visualizing the Past/Peopling the Present. (M) Badler/Erickson.

Mostpeople's information about the Past isdrawn from coffee table picture books, popular movies, video games, documentaries about discoveries of "ancient, mysterious, and lost" civilizations, and tours often led by guides of limited or even dubiouscredentials. How are these ideas presented, formed, and circulated? Who creates and selects the information presented in this diverse media? Are thesepresentations accurate? Do they promote orhurt scientific explanations? Can the artistic, aesthetic, and scientificrealms be bridged to effectively promote the past? This class will focus on case studies and critiques of how archaeology and the past are created, presented and used in movies, museums, games, the internet, and art.

In additionto exploring general conceptsof archaeology and the media, students will work in teams toproduce an interactive, digital media exhibitusing the latest modeling and augmented reality programs for the new archaeological museum at the UNESCO World Heritage site of Tiwanaku, Bolivia. Althoughnearly abandoned for a millennium and sacked by treasure hunters, the ruins are considered one of the most important archaeological sites in South America and visited by 45,000 tourists a year. Potential class projectsinclude fly-throughs of architectural renderings; simulations of the design and engineering of the pyramids, temples, and palaces; modeling of human behavior within architectural settings;and studying artifacts in the Penn Museum.The results will be displayed in the Tiwanaku Museum and will serve to introducevisitors to the site.

SM 260. (STSC268) Culturesof Science and Technology. (M) Petryna.

Scienceand technology figure centrally in the economic, political, and socio-cultural changes that impact our worlds. Happenings in the life sciences, including the discovery of new genes, pathways, and processes, are redrawing concepts of the body and human nature and refiguring social and political relations. The seminarstarts from the premise that scientific facts are made, not things existinga priori in the world and that are merely picked up by researchers and consumed by lay audiences. Likewise, technologies are created through a process of intense negotiation between producersand their sophisticated users. Focusing on the biosciences, we explore the productionof science and technology andhow they 1)affect individuals, self-identities, subjectivity, kinship, and social relationships; 2)have interacted with orreinforced politicalprograms, racial classifications, unequal access to knowledge, and patterns of social injustice;3)inform contemporary institutional structures,strategies of governance, and practices of citizenship. We will combine methods and perspectives from social and cultural anthropology, and thesocial studies of science and technology, and will draw from historical case studies, contemporary ethnographies of science, scientific and medical journals,

documentary films and media reports.

SM 273. (HSOC239) Global Health: Anthropological Perspectives. (M) Petryna.

In some parts of the world spendingon pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people struggle for survival amid new and reemergingepidemics and havelittle or no access tobasic or life-saving therapies. Treatments for infectious diseasesthat disproportionately affect the world's poor remain under-researched and global health disparities are increasing. This interdisciplinary seminar integrates perspectives from thesocial sciences and thebiomedical sciences to explore 1) the development and global flows ofmedical technologies; 2) how the health ofindividuals and groups is affected by medical technologies, public policy, and the forces of globalization as each of these impacts local worlds. This course is a Benjamin Franklin Seminar.

The seminar isstructured to allow us toexamine specific case material from around the world (Haiti, South Africa, Brazil, Russia, China, India, for example),and to address the ways in which social, political-economic, and technological factors -- which are increasingly global in nature -- influence basic biological mechanisms and disease outcomes and distribution.As we analyze each case and gain familiarity with ethnographic methods, we willaskhow more effective interventions can be formulated. The course draws from historical and ethnographic accounts, medical journals, ethical analyses,and films, and familiarizes students with critical debateson globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes.

SM 282. (CINE282, ENGL282, RELS208) Native American Literature. (M) Powell.

Spring 2014 Topic: This course will explore the dramatic changes that have occurred in the last century in the way Native Americans have been represented in the medium of film. Beginning with silent films like The VanishingAmerican and moving forward to contemporary films written, directed, and acted by Native Americans, the class will progress from the study ofstereotypical images ofHollywood films to the current era of the Native American Renaissance, which has produced films like Smoke Signals, Whale Rider, andTheFast Runner. Because the course is cross-listed in Religious Studies, English, and Anthropology, we will focus on the power offilm to convey dimensions of Native American cultures that are more difficultto appreciate in written accounts. In other words, film is able to convey dimensionsof the oral tradition, material culture, and spiritual significance of the land much more effectively because of the visual and audio components of the medium. The films will be situated in a richly nuanced historical and cultural context in order to provide students with a fuller sense of the Native cultures that are the subjects of the films studied during the semester.

307. (ANTH607) Contemporary Native Americans. (M) Bruchac.

Thiscourse examines the social and politicallives of contemporary Native American Indians in the United States and Canada. Topics include: Indigenous identity; homelands and natural resources; popular culture and media;Indigenous arts and cultural expression;museum representations; athletics;gender relations; tribal recognition and sovereignty; and resistance movements. We will consider the origins of federal programs and legislation that have become essential to the protection of Native American freedoms. Students can expect to gain an appreciation of the complexity and cultural diversityof Native communities and tribal nations and insights into their interactions with other culturesover time.

SM 300. Senior CapstoneSeminar. (A) Staff. Open to senior anthropology majors

ANTH300 is a CapstoneSeminar for anthropology majors in their senior year. It defines the Penn anthropology major bybringing together and inter-relating major threads from the different subfieldsof the Penn anthropology curriculum. Each session includes contributions from members of the standing faculty and seminar discussions of a research theme inwhich anthropological knowledge iscurrently progressing.

301. Senior Thesis. (B) Staff. Permit required

Individual research under faculty supervision culminating in a thesis.

SM 305. (ANTH609, URBS409)Anthropology & Policy: History, Theory,Practice. (B) Staff.

Fromthe inception of the discipline, anthropologists have applied their ethnographic and theoretical knowledge to policy issues concerning the alleviationof practical human problems. This approachhas not only benefited peoples in need but ithasalso enriched thediscipline, providing anthropologists with the opportunity to develop new theories and methodologies from a problem-centered approach.The class will examine the connectionbetween anthropology and policy, theory and practice (or

'praxis'), research and application. We will study these connections by reading about historical and current projects. As an ABCS course, studentswill also volunteer in a volunteer organization of their choice in the Philadelphia area, conduct anthropological research on the organization, and suggest ways that the anthropological approachmight support the efforts of the organization.

SM 308. Ethnohistory of the Native Northeast. (C) Bruchac.

Ethnohistoryis a multi-disciplinary form of ethnographic study and documentary research that employs both anthropological and historical approaches. This course examines the foundationsof the ethnohistorical method as ameans to interpret cross-cultural colonial interactions and conflicts, and to better understandthe complex histories of Native American Indian peoples from Pennsylvania and northward and eastward. Students will develop skills and strategies for interpreting and contextualizingprimary and secondary source materials, oral traditions, colonial records, historical maps, and material culture. Hands-on study will include visits to local archives and historical sites to view relevant documents and landscapes.

SM 309. (ANTH519) Psychoanalysis and Anthropology. (C) Urban.

Thiscourse will introduce students totherich literature that has grown up around the encounter between psychoanalysis and anthropology, from totem and taboo, tostudies of theOedipus complex, child-rearing practices, ritual symbolism, mythology, and dreams. The class will also look to the future, endeavoring toexamine aswell such issues astherole of computers (are they selfobjects?) and the internet (includingsuch online games as "Second Life"), dreams inspace alien abduction narratives, sexuality in advertising, politicalpsychology, and other contemporary issues.

SM 312. (HSOC321, URBS312)Health in Urban Communities.(A) Johnston.

Thiscourse will introduce students to anthropological approaches tohealth and to theories of participatory action research.This combined theoretical perspective will then be put into practice using West Philadelphia community schools as a case study. Students will become involved in the design and implementation of health-related projects at an urban elementary or middle school. As one of the course requirements, studentswill be expected to produce a detailed research proposal for future implementation.

SM 316. Anthropologyof Global Labor. (M) Kim.

Thiscourse explores thetheoretical and ethnographic approachesto the diverse forms of labor inthe world. Course discussions will begin by examininghow the historical process of industrializationcreated the modern concepts of time and the ideal industrial workers. Later we will investigate how local communities and individuals react to the changes caused by rapidly globalizing capitalism. By reading ethnographic writings about the various workplaces incapitalist and post-socialist countries, students can understand how the existing "culture" of the people has affected theirreactions to the incessant changes. Course topics include both domestic and international cases.For domestic workplaces, we will look into the daily lives of MBA job holders in Manhattan, part-time restaurant workers in the Midwest, and Mexican migrant workers in the Deep South. For internationalworkplaces, we will investigate Japanese white-collar workers' reaction tothecall of globalization, Colombian tin miners' survival strategies to the fluctuatinginternational market price of tin ore, Chinese workers' understanding of their sweatshop jobs, Indian women workers' views about their jobs in a global call center; origins of "corporate culture" and its local applications in South Korea.

SM  334. (AFRC334,  AFRC634, ANTH634,  GSWS334, GSWS634)  Feminist Ethnography.

Thomas.Prerequisite(s): Should have some fundamental knowledge of Cultural Anthropology.

Thiscourse will investigatethe relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of researchinterest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work ongender and sex byanthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and politicaleconomy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will criticallyread contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigatewhat it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processesthrough a genderedlens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.

SM319. (CLST309) Pottery & Archaeology. (M) Boileau.Prerequisite(s):Any introduction to archaeology course or permission of instructor.

Potteryis the most ubiquitous material recovered from most archaeological sites of the last 10,000 years; all archaeologists must be capable of working with it. This course presents the basics on the recovery, documentation, and analysis of archaeological pottery. Instruction includes treatment of pottery in the field, museum, and laboratory.Students will develop critical awareness of the potentials and problems of interpreting pottery withinthe wider social contexts of production, exchange and consumption. This course will foster an appreciation of the range and complexity of pottery studiesand encourage students to understand the materials and technological processes used in the manufacture of pottery.

328. Performing Culture, NativeAmerican Arts. (C) Bruchac.

This course analyzes cultural performances as sites for the formation, expression, and transmission of social identity.Students will read ethnographies, critiques, and reports of performance genres including ritual,theater, music, dance, art, and spoken word, with aparticular focus on Native American and Indigenousarts and expressions. Topics include:expressive culture as survivance; debates around authenticity and invented traditions; public identity and sexuality;political resistance;the effects of globalization; transnationalism and hybridity; cultural appropriation; and the transformation of folk performances in the wake of modern media.

SM329. (ANTH529, PSYS329)Psychoanalytic and Anthropological Perspectiveson Childhood.(M) Lawrence Blum.

Thiscourse will consider theinteraction between cultureand individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. Through through an examinationof phases of human developmentdescribed by psychoanalysis, and evidence concerning psychoanalytic ideas from around the world, we will considerquestions such as: How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How do we develop emotionally? What features are and are not universal for our species? What is and is not known about these questions. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist, one a pediatrician.

341. (ANTH667) Psychology and Culture.(C) Urban.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 002.

Thetopic in the coming term is identity."Identity," according to AFC Wallace, "may be consideredany image, or set of images (consciousor unconscious), which an individualhas of himself or herself". The full set of images of self refers to many aspects of the person on a number levels of generality: "his or her" wishes and desires, strengthsand capabilities, vulnerabilities and weaknesses, pastexperiences, moral qualities, social status androles, physical appearance, sexual orientation, ethnic, religious, or group identification and much else. Our task in this course is to examine the ways people develop and deploy their social and personal identity over the course of their lives under conditionsof a culturally constituted conception of self. Cross-cultural materials we will considerinclude films, autobiographicalwritings, personal observations, and life history representations.

SM 347. Anthropologyof Corporations. (C) Urban.

Modern business corporations can becharacterized as having their own internal cultures, more or less distinct from one another. They also exist within encompassing cultures and cultural flows. At the same time, corporations are producersand disseminators, and thus have effects on their surrounding environments, effects that extend from the local to the global.Thiscourse examinesmodern corporations from these three perspectives through theoretical and ethnographic readings,guest speakers from the corporate world, and independent research conducted by the students. Course requirements include student presentations of their research and readings; one or more take-home exams; and a final research paper.

SM 359. (HSOC359, URBS359)Nutritional Anthropology. (M) Rovner.

Thiscourse will explore the significance as itrelates to food behaviors and nutritional status in contemporary human populations. The topics covered will be examined from a biocultural perspective and include 1) definiteion and functions ofnutrients and how different culturesperceive nutrients, 2) basic principles ofhuman growth and development,3) methods to assess dietary intake, 4)food taboos, 5)feeding practices of infants and children, 6) food marketing, 7)causes and consequences of under and overnutrition and 8) food insecurity and hunger

404. Introduction to the Human Skeleton. (M) Monge.

Anintroduction to the anatomy and biology of the human skeleton.Laboratory work will be supplemented bylectures and demonstrations on the development structure, function, and evolution of the human skeleton.

407. Human Evolution.(M) Monge.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 003.

An examination of the fossil and other evidence documenting human evolution.Lectures and readings are supplemented with slide and fossil reproduction materials.

415. Archaeology of Animals. (M) Moore.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 001 or permission from instructor.This course introduces the study of animal bones from archaeological sites. Faunal analysisis an

interdisciplinaryscience which draws methods from archaeology, biology, and paleontology. Bones, shells, and other remainsyield evidence for the use ofanimals by humans, and evidence for the biology of animals and for past environments. The course will focus on research approachesto important transitions in human-animal relationships: the developmentof human hunting and fishing, animal domestication, early pastoralism, and the emergenceof market economies in animalproducts. Class presentations willinclude lectures and discussion concerning researchdesign and archaeological case material, with additional videos, slidework with field and laboratory equipment, and supervised work identifying and describing archaeological materials from theUniversity Museum's collections.

SM 420. Nations,Nationalism & Politics.(M) Kim.

Thiscourse explores historical and ethnographic approachesto the diverse forms of nations and nationalism in the world. Coursediscussions will begin by examininghow capitalism contributed to the formation of a nationalist bourgeois class and how this "historical" class took akeyrole in creating the conceptsof nation, national territory and unified national market. We will investigatehow people and local communities reacted to the changes caused by these spreading ideas. By reading about the various forms and ideas ofnation and nationalism, students can understand how the unique conditionsof a specific locale have affected their formation, sometimeswith destructive consequences, examining cases both from "the West"and "the rest".Inthe case of the West we will firstly look into the constructive role of bourgeois class during the French Revolution and how they created the ideal form of a nation, which has clearly divided nationalterritories, a national language and a nationaleducation system, army, and most of all, a unified nationalmarket. Later we will discuss how the image oftheideal nation has been transferred toother places and transformed according to the specific local situations.

Forthese cases, we will analyze the fledglingdemocracy of the new colony of Great Britain (the U.S.), the primordial nationalism ofJapan and Korea (both North and South), theemerging patriotic nationalism ofChina, the process of nation building in the Southeast Asian countries such as Singapore, Malaysia and Indonesia,the militant/jingoistic nationalism of the post-socialist countries such as Russia, and so on.

SM 429. Anthropologyof the Environment.Petryna.

Thisseminar draws from social scientific and scientific literatures to explore current themes in the anthropology of the environment. We will investigate the links between climate change science and social science, and the ways inwhichanthropologists can contribute via in-depth fieldwork methodology and long engagement in issues of society-environment interactions. We will also explore how potential environmental, social, and biological impacts of global warming on the future are being assessed through conceptual paradigms linked to risk, probability, scenario forecasting,tipping points, planetary boundaries, and extinction.

433. (LALS433) Andean Archaeology. (M) Erickson.

Consideration oftheculture history of the native peoples of the Andean area, with emphasison the pre-conquest archaeology of the Central-Andean region.

SM 441. (HSOC441) Cross Cultural Approaches to Health and Illness. (M) Barg.

Thiscourse will explore the ways that health andillness-related beliefs and behaviors develop within communities.We will identifythe forces that shape these beliefs and behaviors and ultimatelyaffect who gets sick, who gets well, and the very nature of the illness experience.Emphasis will be given to the relationships among sociocultural, political and biological factors and theways thatthese factors interact to produce the variation that we see in health and illness relatedattitudes, behaviors and outcomes across cultures.

SM 451. (ANTH751) Historical Archaeology. (M) Schuyler.

Archaeologyof the Modern World from the Columbian voyage (1492) to the 20th century. Topics such as the rise ofearly modern Europe, European exploration and colonization, African American Archaeology, Asian American Archaeology, the rise ofcolonial society, contact with native peoples, the Industrial Revolution,and the archaeology of the 20th century will be covered.

454. Quantitative Analysis of Anthropological Data. (C) Dibble.

Problem-oriented approach toapplication of quantitative methods inanthropological research. Emphasis on formulation ofspecific problems using real data sets by each studentin his or her area of interest. The logic of problem solving using quantitative arguments, the investigationof data reliability and representativeness, and the use ofstatistical arguments inthepresentation of results covered in detail. Use of digital computers as research tools will be an integral part of the presentation.

102. (CINE112, COML245, ENGL102, GSWS102) STUDY OF A THEME. SM 369. (ENGL369, GSWS369)TOPICS POETRY & POETICS.

Graduate Courses

SM 512. Experimental Lithic Technology. (M) Dibble.

Stonetools are the most significantsource of information about past human behavior and evolution over the past 2.5 million years. But because stone technology has been largely abandoned, archaeologists often rely on experiments to help them determine how such tools were made and used. This course will review the kinds ofexperiments most often used (both actualistic and replicative), but will focus on understanding the mechanics of stone flaking through controlled experiments.Aspart of their study, students will take part inbothdesigning and implementing a series of experiments involving mechanical flaking ofmolded glass cores, and will apply the results ofthisresearch to archaeologicalspecimens.

SM 511. (HIST512) Ethics,Archaeology Cultural Heritage. (M) Leventhal.

Thisseminar  will explore  some of the most impor tant issues  that are now a central par t of archaeological, anthropological and historical research throughout the world. The identification and control of cultural heritage is a central part of the framework for research within other communities. Issues for this course willalso include cultural identity, human rights, repatriation, colonialism, working with communities and many other topics.Fieldresearch today must be based upon a new series of ethical standardsthat will be discussed and examined within this class.Major topics include: cultural heritage -definitions and constructs, cosmopolitanism and collecting, archaeology and looting, cultural heritage preservation, museums - universal and national, museum acquisition policies, cultural identity, international conventions (including underwater issues),national laws ofownership, community based development, cultural tourism, developmentmodels, and human rights.

SM 516. (AFST516, GSWS516,URBS516) Public Interest Workshop. (M) Suess.

Thisis a Public InterestEthnography workshop (originally created by Peggy Reeves Sanday - Department ofAnthropology) that incorporates an interdisciplinary approach to exploring social issues. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students, the workshop isa response to Amy Gutmann's call for interdisciplinary cooperation across the University and totheDepartment of Anthropology's commitment to developing public interestresearch and practice as a disciplinary theme. Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on: 1) merging problem solving with theory and analysisin the interest of change motivated by a commitmentto social justice, racial harmony, equality, and human rights; and 2) engaging in public debate on human issues to make researchresults accessible to a broader audience.The workshop brings in guest speakers and will incorporate original ethnographic researchto merge theory with action. Studentsare encouraged to apply the framing model to a public interest research and action topic of their choice. This is an academically-based-community-service (ABCS) course that partners directlywith Penn's Netter Center for Community Partnerships.

SM 519. (ANTH309) Psychoanalysis & Anthropology. (C) Urban.

Thiscourse will introduce students totherich literature that has grown up around the encounter between psychoanalysis and anthropology, from totem and taboo, tostudies of theOedipus complex, child-rearing practices, ritual symbolism, mythology, and dreams. The class will also look to the future, endeavoring toexamine aswell such issues astherole of computers (are they selfobjects?) and the internet (includingsuch online games as "Second Life"), dreams inspace alien abduction narratives, sexuality in advertising, politicalpsychology, and other contemporary issues.

525. (PUBH526) Anthropologyand Public Health. (M) Barg.Prerequisite(s): PUBH 502.

In this course, we examine three types ofrelationships between anthropology and public health. Anthropology and public health will examine complementary andcompeting conceptsfundamental to each discipline and ways that these concepts make it essential and difficult for the disciplines to work together. Anthropology on public health takes a critical look at assumptionsin public health praxis.Anthropology inPublic Health will focus on ways that anthropological theory and methods inform the practice of public health. Using these three approaches, we will examine topics in public health such as mental health, health promotion/disease prevention communication, cancer disparities, reproductive health, violence and infectious disease. Students will learn and apply anthropologic research methods to these problems.

SM529. (ANTH329, PSYS329)Psychoanalytic and Anthropological Perspectiveson Childhood.(M) Lawrence Blum.

Thiscourse will consider theinteraction between cultureand individual psychology, and between nature and nurture from birth to adulthood. Through through an examinationof phases of human developmentdescribed by psychoanalysis, and evidence concerning psychoanalytic ideas from around the world, we will considerquestions such as: How do people become who they are, both similar to others and uniquely individual? How do we develop emotionally? What features are and are not universal for our species? What is and is not known about these questions. The instructors are both psychoanalysts, one a psychiatrist, one a pediatrician.

SM  542. (COMM542,  EDUC545)   Par t   I-Documentary,   Ethnography,   and   Research: CommunicatingScholarship through Film/Video. Jackson.

Students will learn how towrite, shoot, edit, and upload documentary films over the length of this two- part course. In the first part, studentscomplete a program of hands-on formal training in filmcraft while they simultaneously identify a researchsubject that they will propose to depict in a documentary film. In the second part ofthecourse students willproduce the faculty-approved documentary themselves. The film's final cut must be screened by the end of the second semester. Students should expect to work on their projectsoutside class time. The school will provide basic filmmakingequipment- video cameras and computers for editing in labs. Students are responsible for all storage (computerdrives), tapes, dvds, and project related costs.

561. (VCSN657) Global Food Security. (M) Spooner.

Thisis an interdisciplinary course on the problems of food demand and consumption, production and supply in our increasingly globalized and urbanizingworld. Specialattention will be given to the intersections of current technologies of food production, current nutritional problems, environmental change and resource degradation,and the changingquality of human social life under globalization. Where and how will sufficient nutritious food beproduced sustainably and how can the politics and economics of equitable distribution in such large urban populations be achieved?

547. (EDUC547, FOLK527, URBS547) Anthropology& Education. (C) Hall.

Anintroduction to the intent, approach,and contribution ofanthropology to the study ofsocialization and schoolingin cross-cultural perspective.Education is examined in traditional, colonial, and complex industrial societies.

SM  556. (AAMW556)  Practicum in  Archaeological  Field  Methods and  Problems. (M)

Dibble.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 241 or 600 and one archaeology area course or permission of instructor.

Seminar analyzing process of archaeological excavation as aproblem of research design and method, stressingexcavation asanintegrated methodological system ofresearch dealing with data retrieval, storage processing,integration and interpretation leading to final publication. Course intended for students proposing archaeological careers;itwill be assumed participantshave some practical excavation experience.

SM557. (AAMW557, LALS557) Seminar in ArchaeologicalTheory and Method: Archaeologyof Landscapes.(M) Erickson.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 241 or 600 and one archaeologyarea course or permission of instructor.

Advancedseminar forpotential professionalarchaeologists. Course will examine critically main past and present theoreticalissues in archaeological research and interpretation, and consider various methodologies utilized towards these interpretive ends.

567. (ANTH267,CLST268, CLST568, NELC286, NELC586) Living World in Archaeological

Science. (M) Kassabaum, Monge, Moore.

Byfocusing on the scientificanalysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the new Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroomexercises to give students hands- on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.

SM 586. Desire and Demand. (M) Diggs-Thompson. See course description for ANTH 086.

Doesconsumption shape culture or does culture shape consumption? As even the most mundane purchase becomes sociallysymbolic and culturally meaningfulwe can persuasively argue that the concept of "need" has been transformed.Analyzing a variety of physical and virtual consumer venues,the goal of this seminar is to understand and to analyze historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. We investigatesocial and political-economic factors that impact when and how people purchase goods and argue that behavior attached to consumption includes a nexus of influencesthat may change periodicallyin response to external factors. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and require a critical analyses of global/local linkages. The city of Philadelphia becomes the seminar'slaboratory as we ask how have issues of culture, consumption, and global capitalism become intertwined around the world?

SM 587. (AFRC587, LALS588)Race, Nation, Empire. (B) Thomas.

Thisgraduate seminar examines the dynamic relationships among empires, nations and states; colonialand post-colonial policies; and anti-colonial strategies within a changing global context. Using the rubrics of anthropology, history, cultural studies, and social theory, we will explore the intimacies of subject formation within imperial contexts- past and present- especially inrelation to ideas about race and belonging.We will focus on how belongingand participation have been defined in particular locales, as well as how these notions have been socialized through avariety of institutional contexts. Finally, we willconsider the relationships between popular culture and state formation, examining these as dialectical struggles for hegemony.

SM 600. Contemporary Archaeology in Theory.(C) Staff. First-year anthropology graduate students. This graduate seminaraddresses contemporary anthropological archaeology and considersthe varied

waysinferences are made about past and present human behavior from the archaeological record.It reviews such fundamental topics astheuse of analogy, Middle Range theory, symbolism and meaning, social and cultural evolution, ideology and power, feminism and gender, and indigenous (non-Western) perspectives.It also foregrounds basic issues regarding heritage, looting, and ethics.

SM 602. Human Evolutionary Anthropology. (C) Schurr. First-year anthropology graduate students. First-year anthropology graduate students. This course is an introduction to the study of human

evolution through a survey of evidence from the various subfieldsof evolutionary anthropology. Specialattention will be paid to currentissues and problems in thesesubfields, and the different ways inwhich researchers are attemptingto understand and uncover the details of human evolution. Among the areas of inquiry to be covered inthiscourse are paleoanthropology, primatology, human biology, molecularanthropology, and evolutionary biology. Some specific issues to be explored will include the primate roots of human behavior, brain and language evolution, new fossil hominids, the origins of anatomically modern humans, and human biogenetic variation.

SM617. Contemporary Approaches to the Study of Culture and Society. (C) Petryna/Thomas. First-year anthropology graduate students.

Acritical examinationof recent history and theory in cultural and social anthropology. Topics include structural-functionalism; symbolic anthropology; post-modern theory. Emphasis is on major schools and trends in America, Britain, and France.

SM 603. Language in Culture and Society. (C) Agha. First-year anthropology graduate students.

First-yearanthropology graduate studentsor Instructor Permission. Examination of properties of human languagewhich enable social persons to interpret the cultural world and to act within it. Topics include: principles of lexical and grammaticalorganization; the role of language structure (grammar) and linguistic context (indexicality) in discursive activity; referential uses of language; social interaction; markers of social role,identity, and group-belonging; criteria bywhichmodels of linguisticform and function are formulated;the empirical limits within which different models have explanatory value.

SM 605. (COML605, FOLK605,MUSC605) Anthropologyof Music. (C) Staff.

Theoriesand methods oftheethnomusicological approach to the study of music in culture, applied to selected western and non-western performance contexts.

607. (ANTH307) Contemporary Native Americans. (M) Bruchac.

Thiscourse examines the social and politicallives of contemporary Native American Indians in the United States and Canada. Topics include: Indigenous identity; homelands and natural resources; popular culture and media;Indigenous arts and cultural expression;museum representations; athletics;gender relations; tribal recognition and sovereignty; and resistance movements. We will consider the origins of federal programs and legislation that have become essential to the protection of Native American freedoms. Students can expect to gain an appreciation of the complexity and cultural diversityof Native communities and tribal nations and insights into their interactions with other culturesover time.

SM618. Mediatized Culture in Contemporary Society. (M) Agha.Prerequisite(s):ANTH 603 or permission from Instructor.

Thecourse examinesthe role of mass media in organizing and disseminating cultural norms and values in contemporary society. Particular attentionis given to two domains of organized social life, namely consumer behavior and public opinion.The course explores the ways in which mass media organize aspects of individual preference and taste, matters of identity and lifestyle, and the sense of belonging to a common culture.Issues of how individualscome to acquire common tastes and opinions, and attempt to vary upon them indefining their positional identities and stakes are central areas of concern. Material from a variety of present-day societies is discussed in comparative terms.

620. Directed Reading and Research. (C) Staff. May be repeated for credit

Tobe arranged only by consultation with academic adviser and faculty member(s) to be involves;a proposed syllabus must bepresented for approval, and written papers will berequired without exception. On approval of these  papers one  copy  must  be presented  to the  Depar tment of Anthropology office for filing.

621. Directed Field Trainingand Research. (C) Staff. May be repeated for credit

Tobe arranged only by consultation with academic adviserand the faculty member(s)to be involved;a proposed syllabus must be presented for approval and written papers will be required without exception. On approval  of these papers, one  copy  must  be presented to the Depar tment  of Anthropology office for filing.

SM 622. Topics in Physical Anthropology. (M) Staff.

Humansare characterized by several distinctive life history features, e.g. large babies, late age at puberty and first reproduction, cessation of menstruation long before death, and a long life span.In addition,our reproductive decisionsare heavily influenced by society and culture. This seminar will explore human life history from an evolutionary ecology andbiocultural perspective, and will analyze the possible contributions ofthisapproach to other disciplinessuch as demography, sociology, medicine, and public health. We will read and discuss seminal papers and recent developments on the topic.

SM626. Medical Anthropology: Case Studies and Methods. (M) Petryna.Prerequisite(s): Permission of instructor.

Intensive analysis of the application of anthropological theory and methodology to problems of human health and health care. Offered for students in the Medical Anthropology Program. Other qualified students may enroll with the permission of instructor.

SM 628. Language in Culture and Society: Special Topics. (M) Agha.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 603 or

Instructor Permission.

Thecourse is devoted to a single research topic of contemporary interest in linguistic anthropology. Topicsvary from year to year. Readingslocate current debates in relationto longstanding assumptionsin the literature and new directions in contemporary research.

SM 630. (ANTH103) Ceramicsand Ceramic Analysis. (M) Zettler.

Introductionto ceramics, ceramic typology and analysis. Course will utilize largely work done on ancient Near Eastern ceramics, though itis not intended as anintroduction toancient Near Eastern ceramic sequences. Course is intended as a practical introduction for archaeologists to ceramics, the ways ceramics are collected and dealt with in the field, ceramic typologyand "laboratory analyses". To provide depth, the course will cover both the ways ceramics have been dealt with in the past and current trends in the study of ceramics.

636. (ANTH236, NELC241) Mesopotamia: Heartland of Cities and Empires. (M) Zettler.

Thiscourse surveys the cultural traditions of ancient Mesopotamia, the land between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers, aregion commonly dubbed "cradle of civilization" or "heartland of cities," from an archaeological perspective. It will investigate the emergence of sedentismand agriculture;early villages and increasingly complex Neolithicand Chalcolithic cultures; the evolution of urban, literate societies in the late 4th millennium; the city-states and incipient supra-regional politiesof the third and second millennium;the gradual emergenceof the Assyrian and Babylonian "world empires," well- known from historical books of the Bible, in the first millennium; and the cultural mix of Mesopotamia under the successive dominationof Greeks, Persians and Arabs. The course  seeks to foster an appreciation of the rich cultural heritage of ancient Mesopotamia, an  understanding  of cultural continuities in the Middle East and a sense of the ancient Near Eastern underpinnings of western civilization.

SM 631. Grammatical Categories. (M) Agha.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 603 or Instructor Permission.

The course is an introduction to grammatical organization in human language for studentsin linguistic anthropology and associated fields. Primary foci: methods for the analysis of grammaticalcategories; constituency and propositional content; grammatical typologyand universals. Other topics:relationship of grammaticalcategories tootherprinciples organizing communication, conceptualization and interpersonal conduct;analysis of interlocking category systems; relationship of categories to actual human behavior. Studentsare encouraged to apply the techniquesdeveloped in lectures and assigned readings to the analysis of a non-Indo-European languageover the course of the semester.

633. (ANTH230, CRIM230) ForensicAnthropology. (M) Monge.

Thiscourse will investigateand discuss the various techniques ofanalysis that biological anthropologists can apply to forensic cases. Topics include human osteology, the recovery of bodies, the analysisof life history, the reconstruction of causes of death, and various case studies where anthropologists have contributed significantly to solving forensic cases. Discussions will include the limitations offorensic anthropology and the application ofDNA recovery to skeletal/mummified materials.

SM 634. (ANTH334, GSWS334,GSWS634) Feminist Ethnography. (M) Thomas.

Thiscourse will investigatethe relationships among women, gender, sexuality, and anthropological research. We will begin by exploring the trajectory of researchinterest in women and gender, drawing first from the early work ongender and sex byanthropologists like Margaret Mead and Ruth Benedict; moving through the 1970s and 1980s arguments about gender, culture, and politicaleconomy; arriving at more current concerns with gender, race, sexuality, and empire. For the rest of the semester, we will criticallyread contemporary ethnographies addressing pressing issues such as nationalism, militarism, neoliberalism and fundamentalism. Throughout, we will investigatewhat it means not only to "write women's worlds", but also to analyze broader socio-cultural, political, and economic processesthrough a genderedlens. We will, finally, address the various ways feminist anthropology fundamentally challenged the discipline's epistemological certainties, as well as how it continues to transform our understanding of the foundations of the modern world.

SM 640. (AFRC640, COMM740)Race, Diaspora & Critique. (M) Thomas.

Thiscourse will attempt toengage students in an interdisciplinary conversation about the epistemological, methodological, andpolitical interventions framing/grounding/informing Africana Studies as a scholarly endeavor.Students will be asked to consider the context and content of this evolving field/discipline, examiningthe ideological and intellectual issues that drive debates within (and critiques of) African-American/Africana Studies (indeed, the very difference insuchdesignations bespeaks important demographic and ideological shifts within the academy and beyond). Studentswill be introduced tosomeof the major historical and contemporary literatures in Africana Studies across the humanities and social sciences, emphasizing"diaspora" as a guiding construct and organizing principle. Class discussions will be aimed at expandingstudents' knowledge of the sources available for research in Africana Studies - with an eye toward guiding their preparation for future scholarly research informed by the questionsand critical conceptualizations emergingfrom Africana Studies.

SM 643. Globalization And Its Historical Significance. (M) Spooner.

Globalizationis one of the most comprehensive topics ofourtime, and also one of the most controversial. This course assessesthe current state of globalization, considering it in terms of economic, political,and cultural change, and follows its progress through the semester. The class will be led throughthe main topics and debates, introduced toconceptual and empirical tools for framing academic discussion and research about its dynamics, how and when it began,and (most particularly)how it differs from earlier episodes of historical change.Students will monitor the course of globalization inthecourse of the semester, take an exam on thereadings and lectures, and develop their own research project on a related issue of their choice.

SM 649. (ANTH246) MolecularAnthropology. (C) Schurr.

Thiscourse exploresthe molecular revolution in biologicalanthropology, and in particular, examines the nature and theory of collectingmolecular data to address anthropological questions concerning human origins, evolution and biological variation. Students will review the methods used to analyze molecular genetic data, and learn to draw evolutionary and phylogenetic conclusions from this information.

662. Social Reorganization: Tribes, Communities & Corporations. (M) Spooner.

A wide variety ofethnographic and sociological examples of formal and informal organization will be described and analyzed within the framework of the emergingmodern awareness of the possibility of organizing and reorganizing societyand social groups for specificshort- and long-term objectives.

654.(ANTH100, NELC281, NELC681, SAST161)Topics In Anthropology and the Modern World. (A) Spooner.

Thiscourse relates anthropological models and methods to current problems in the Modern World. The overall objective is to show how the research findings and analytical concepts of anthropology may be used toilluminate and explain events as they have unfolded in the recent news and in the course of the semester. Eachedition of the course will focus on a particular country or region that has been in the news.

SM 655. Methods and Grantwriting for Anthropological Research. (M) Thomas.

Thiscourse is designed for third- and fourth-year graduate students in anthropology who are working on their dissertation researchproposals and submitting grants.Graduate students from other departments who will be submitting grant proposalsthat include an ethnographic component are also welcome. Students will develop their proposalsthroughout the course of the semester, and will meet important fall submission deadlines. They will begin by working with various databasesto search funding sources relevant to the research they plan to conduct. In class sessions, they will also workwith the professor and their peers to refine their research questions, their methods, the relationship of any previous research to their dissertation fieldwork, and the broader theoretical and "real-world" significance of their proposed projects. Finally, students will also have the opportunity to have live "chats" with representatives from funding agencies, thereby gaining a better sense of what particular foundations are looking for in a proposal.

SM 658. Discourse Analysis. (C) Agha.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 603.

Examinationof current theories and methods in the study of discourse, including verbal and non- verbal communication.Eachstudent conductsan ethnographic or historical study of adiscursive practice, culminating in a class presentation and term paper. The first half of the course focuses on the study of discursive interaction insmallscale face toface encountersbetween individuals, including methods of data collection, transcription, and analysis. The second half takes up public discourses which involve many social actors, are linked towidespread social practices, and result in the coordinationof large-scale patterns of action, belief, and value in society.

667. (ANTH341) Topics In Psychology & Culture. (C) Urban.

Ourtask in this course is to examine some of the ways in which people develop and deploy their identities under the conditions of a rapidly changing world. This task is part of a life-long process, or journey, which begins inone's family of origin and isshaped by thecultural life plan while growing up. Features ofthelife plan involve creative reflection, taking risks,learning from errorsand failures, assessingone's feelings, revising one's operating knowledge, altering one's goals andtaking the next steps forward.Life stories then become the repository of one's steps along the way, sometimes challenged by experiences inextreme situations and at othertimes facilitated by the rituals of our lives. Fulfillment becomes aproduct of the process of appraisal and of the means of coping with the exigencies of life, includingits culmination and ending.

SM 695. Current Topics in Molecular Anthropology. (M) Schurr.

Anexamination ofthenature and theory of collecting moleculardata to address biological anthropological questions concerning human origins, evolution and biologicalvariation. Studentswill review the methods used to analyze molecular genetic data, and learn to draw evolutionary and phylogenetic conclusions from information.

SM 701. (AFRC701, AFST701,HIST701) African Studies Seminar. (M) Staff.

Interdisciplinary seminar for discussion of issues of special interestto graduate students and faculty in

African Studies. Topicsvary according to the interestsand expertise of instructors.

704. (EDUC706, FOLK706, URBS706) Culture/Power/Identities. (A) Hall.

Theseminar provides a forum for critically examining the interrelationships between culture, power, and identities, or forms of difference and relationsof inequality. The central aim is to provide students with an introduction to classic and more recent social theories concerning the bases of social inequality and relations shaped by race, class, ethnic,national and gender differences. Theories discussedin the course provide analytictools for examining the role of social institutions such as education for mediatingsocial hierarchy and difference.Theclass will have a seminar format emphasizing close analysis and discussion of the required readings in relation to a set of overarching questionsconcerning the nature ofpower, forms of social inequality and the politics of identity and difference.

SM 705. (AFRC705, AFST705, FOLK715, GSWS705, MUSC705) Seminarin Ethnomusicology. (M)

Staff. Open to graduate students in all departments.Seminar on selectedtopics in ethnomusicology.

707. (EDUC700) Advanced Ethnographic Design. (B) Hall.

This course is designedto follow after Introduction to Qualitative and Ethnographic Methods (EDUC

672). In the introductory course, studentslearned how to use qualitative methods in conductinga brief field study. This advanced level course focuses on research design and specifically the craft of ethnographic research.Students will apply what they learn in the course in writing a proposal for a dissertation research project.

SM 709. Current Research in Paleoanthropology. (C) Dibble.

Anintensive review ofthemajor topics relating toPleistocene human evolution, focusing on the integration of data from both biology and archeology.

SM 719. (ANTH219) ArchaeologyField Project. (A) Schuyler. Permission of instructor required.

Thisis a parallel course to Anthropology 219, but on the graduate level. It will only be open to select graduate students (i.e.historical archaeologystudents and some CGS MA students). Specific permission of the instructor is required in each case.

SM 710. Readings and Research in Social Organization. (M) Spooner. Study and analysis of selectedproblems in social organization.

SM 715. Globalization Seminar. (M) Spooner.

Weeklyseminar discussions will focus on current news and opinion about social andcultural change that may be interpreted as globalization in different parts of the world. The overall objective is to develop methodological and theoretical approaches to the study of globalization.Students taking the course for credit will be requiredto write a research paper.

SM 717. Cultural Motion Seminar. (C) Urban.

Thisis a graduate seminar/workshop for studentspursuing research in anthropology at any phase - from preliminary readings, to proposalwriting, to dissertation write-up -thatdeals in some way with cultural motion.Students will be expectedto present their own work, and to discussthe work of others, throughoutthe course of the seminar. The course is appropriate for first or second year graduate students in Anthropology seeking to define a research area or already pursuing research. It is also appropriate for third and fourth year students in the proposal-writing phase. And, finally, the seminar will provide a forum for dissertation-writing students interestedin receiving preliminary feedback on their work from peers.

720. (ANTH220) Archaeology Laboratory Field Project. (B) Schuyler.

Follow-up for Anthropology 719 and parallel course to Anthropology 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collectedon Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall.No previous archaeological or lab experience is required.(Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.

SM 723. (AAMW723, ARTH723) Topics in the Art of the Ancient Near East. (M) Pittman. Topic Varies.

SM 727. Archaeology of Latin America Seminar. (M) Staff.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 468 or ANTH 600.

Advancedseminar for students wishing to pursue study of field data, method, & theoretical problems in the archaeology of Latin America.

SM 730. Readings & Research In LinguisticAnthropology. (D) Agha.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 603

OR INSTRUCTORS PERMISSION.

Thecourse is designed for students and faculty interestedin discussing current research and/or research topics in any area of linguistic or semiotic anthropology. The primary intent of the course is to familiarize students with the literature on selectedresearch topics and todevelop their own research agendas in the light of the literature. Studentsmay enroll on an S/U basis for 0.5 CU per semester. The course may be repeated for credit up to 4 times.

747. (ANTH247) Archaeology Laboratory Field Project-Summer. (L) Schuyler.

Thiscourse is a summer version of Anth 720 (see that course for full description). In summer more emphasis will be placed on field visitations. Course open to all graduate students;no instructor permission needed.Course may be repeatedfor credit and studentsmay take both anth 747 and 720. Questions:contact Robert L Schuyler; schuyler@sas.upen.edu;  (215)898-6965; Univ Museum

412/6398.

SM 750. (ANTH450) African American Archaeology. (M) Schuyler.

This course will cover the new and productive field of the archaeology of African Americans from the

17thto the 20th centuries. The focus will be on continental North America but some attentionwill also be given to West Africa (AD 1500 - present) and the West Indies. No background (or previous courses) in archaeology or anthropology is required.

SM 751. (ANTH451) Historical Archaeology. (M) Schuyler. May be repeated for credit.

General background reading and tutorial preparation in the archaeology of the modern world (A.D.

1400- 20th Century).

SM752. (ANTH151) Perspectives on the Evolution of Human Behavior. (M) Staff.Prerequisite(s): ANTH 602 or Instructor permission.

This seminar will considerthe evolution of cognitive skills from a variety of perspectives. One focus will be on hominid anatomical evolution, particularly those aspects relevant to the evolution of human behavior (e.g., neuroanatomy). Another focus will be on non-human primate behavior. We will also consider the archaeological evidence left by Pleistocene humans that may be relevant to thisquestion. The goal of the seminar will be to integrate researchfrom many fields of inquiry in order to gain a better understanding of the human condition.

SM 756. Social Anthropology Seminar. (G) Spooner.

Weeklyseminar discussions will be devoted to the analysisand evaluation ofthesocial anthropology thread or threads inthehistory of anthropology, and their relevance tothepositions and interestsof cultural anthropology today.Students taking the course for credit will be requiredto write a research paper.

SM 757. (ANTH457) Themes In Historical Archaeology. (A) Schuyler.

Coursewill examine research by historical archaeologists on the basic attributes ofhumanity. Elements thatare more biologically grounded (age, gender, race) andelements more purely cultural (ethnicity, class, occupation, nationality, religion)will both be surveyed.Recent field findings and theoretical debates will be covered.

SM 842. (CINE842, COMM842)The Filmic. (M) Jackson.

Thisinterdisciplinary graduate course takes "film" as its object of study, theorizing it as a medium/ mode of representation. We draw on film theory, psychoanalysis, literary analysis, cognitive theory, communicationstudies, and visual anthropology to discuss several key issues related to the state of film/filmmaking in an age of "digital" media. We interrogate contentious notions of authority, reflexivity, and objectivity. We analyze film's claim to "realistic" (iconic and indexical) representation. We interrogate how "film" and "video" get imagined in all their visual particularity, sometimesconflated into a single visual form and at othermoments distinguished as a function of the difference between photochemical and electro-magnetic processes. We also highlightthe kinds of techniques filmmakers use tothematize these same issues "on screen." Students will be responsible for watching one film each week (along with the course readings),and part of the final project involves helpingto produce a group documentary/ethnographic"film" that engages the course's central concerns.