ANTH332 - MED AND LANGUAGE OF PAIN

This course uses concepts from linguistic anthropology to examine (1) how we experience, think about, and talk about pain, and (2) why pain- particularly in its chronic form- can be a particularly complex and morally charged object of medicine. Each week, we will explore readings on a topic in linguistic anthropology that can illuminate a corresponding issue in the medical treatment of pain (and vice versa). We will begin with a focus on cognitive linguistic processes, posing questions such as: How does the manner in which we talk about pain inflect how we actually feel it? We will then expand our gaze to the communication of pain in social interaction. What difficulties does pain's fundamental interiority produce for sufferers and medical practitioners as they attempt to convey pain with language? Finally, we will further broaden our scope to consider how ways of expressing pain become assembled into widely disseminated cultural repertoires linked to gender, ethnicity, and class. As an interdisciplinary endeavor, this course will address issues of high relevance not only to linguistic anthropology but also to medical anthropology, medical sociology, medical ethics, the history and sociology of science, and health policy. Previous experience in linguistic anthropology is not required.
Section 301 - SEM - MEDICINE AND THE LANGUAGE OF PAIN
T 0300PM-0600PM
CLAPP, JUSTIN