Courses for Spring 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ANTH 001-601 ARCHAEOLOGY: WINDOW TO THE HUMAN PAST OLSZEWSKI, DEBORAH UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 0700PM-0830PM This course will introduce students to the methods and theory of archaeology by exploring how we turn archaeological data into statements about cultural behavior. We will discuss the place of archaeology in the broader field of anthropology and debate issues facing the discipline today. The course will rely on case studies from around the world and from many different time periods to introduce students to the research process, field and lab methods, and essential questions of archaeological anthropology. Students will have the opportunity to work hands-on with archaeological materials through visiting the galleries and working with Penn Museum collections.
    History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
    ANTH 002-601 INTRO CULTURAL ANTHRO BURKE, KEVIN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 M 0530PM-0830PM An introduction to the anthropological study of human social and cultural diversity throughout the world, with special emphasis on the development of the idea of culture as an analytical concept. The course includes sections on the ethnographic research method and on the library of ethnographic material relating to cultural change in different parts of the world that anthropology has produced since the 19th century.
      Society sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; SOCIETY SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ANTH 003-601 INTRO HUMAN EVOLUTION MITCHELL, PAUL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 W 0530PM-0830PM How did humans evolve? When did humans start to walk on two legs? How are humans related to non-human primates? This course focuses on the scientific study of human evolution describing the emergence, development, and diversification of our species, Homo sapiens. First we cover the fundamental principles of evolutionary theory and some of the basics of genetics and heredity as they relate to human morphological, physiological, and genetic variation. We then examine what studies of nonhuman primates (monkeys and apes) can reveal about our own evolutionary past, reviewing the behavioral and ecological diversity seen among living primates. We conclude the course examining the "hard" evidence of human evolution - the fossil and material culture record of human history from our earliest primate ancestors to the emergence of modern Homo sapiens. You will also have the opportunity, during recitations, to conduct hands-on exercises collecting and analyzing behavioral, morphological, and genetic data on both humans and nonhuman primates and working with the Department of Anthropology's extensive collection of fossil casts.
        Living World Sector (all classes) LIVING WORLD SECTOR; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
        ANTH 004-001 THE MODERN WORLD AND ITS CULTURAL BACKGROUND URBAN, GREGORY UNIVERSITY MUSEUM B17 MW 1000AM-1100AM An introduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity: ethnicities, religions, languages, political forms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations". Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, in which we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attention to the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context.
          Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ANTH 004-601 MDRN WRLD-CLTRL BKGND CESARIO, CHRISTA W 0600PM-0900PM An introduction to the diversity of cultures in the world. This course is divided into two parts. The first briefly examines different models of understanding human diversity: ethnicities, religions, languages, political forms, economic structures, cultures, and "civilizations". Students will learn to think about the world as an interconnected whole, and know the significance of culture on a global scale. The second part is an introduction to area studies, in which we undertake a survey of the different regions of the world. We conduct the survey paying attention to the different aspects of human diversities, which we examine in the first part of this course. Students will acquire a greater appreciation and understanding of cultural differences in the more comprehensive social context.
            Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
            ANTH 005-001 GREAT TRANSFORMATIONS AL KUNTAR, SALAM CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 214 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course explores the history and archaeology of the last 20,000 years from the development of agriculture to the industrial revolution. Why did people across the world abandon foraging for farming? How and why did cities and states develop? Why did societies succeed or fail? How have humans transformed themselves and the natural world, including the landscape and the climate? We will explore the methods that archaeologists use to consider these questions and analyze evidence for social and economic change from the Middle East, the Americas, Asia, Africa, Australia and Europe. In addition, students will have a chance to conduct hands-on exercises with artifacts from the Penn Museum and an opportunity to do some experimental archaeology during recitations.
              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
              ANTH 012-050 GLOBALIZATION This course describes and analyses the current state of globalization and sets it in historical perspective. It applies the concepts and methods of anthropology, history, political economy and sociology to the analysis and interpretation of what is actually happening in the course of the semester that relates to the progress of globalization. We focus on a series of questions not only about what is happening but about the growing awareness of it and the consequences of the increasing awareness. In answering these questions we distinguish between active campaigns to cover the world (e.g. Christian and Muslim proselytism, free-trade agreements, democratization) and the unplanned diffusion of new ways of organizing trade, capital flows, tourism and remote interaction via the Internet. The body of the course deals with particular dimensions of globalization, reviewing both the early and recent history of each. The overall approach is historical and comparative, setting globalization on the larger stage of the economic, political and cultural development of various parts of the modern world. The course is taught collaboratively by an anthropologist, an historian, and a sociologist, offering the opportunity to compare and contrast distinct disciplinary approaches. It seeks to develop a general social-science-based theoretical understanding of the various historical dimensions of globalization: economic, political, social and cultural.
                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; STUDY ABROAD
                ANTH 022-401 WORLD MUSICS & CULTURES CASTRILLON, JUAN MUSIC BUILDING 101 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                  ANTH 022-402 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES KGAGUDI, SARAH MUSIC BUILDING 102 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                    ANTH 022-403 WORLD MUSIC & CULTURES ZHANG, SHELLEY MUSIC BUILDING 101 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course examines how we as consumers in the "Western" world engage with musical difference largely through the products of the global entertainment industry. We examine music cultures in contact in a variety of ways-- particularly as traditions in transformation. Students gain an understanding of traditional music as live, meaningful person-to-person music making, by examining the music in its original site of production, and then considering its transformation once it is removed, and recontextualized in a variety of ways. The purpose of the course is to enable students to become informed and critical consumers of "World Music" by telling a series of stories about particular recordings made with, or using the music of, peoples culturally and geographically distant from the US. Students come to understand that not all music downloads containing music from unfamiliar places are the same, and that particular recordings may be embedded in intriguing and controversial narratives of production and consumption. At the very least, students should emerge from the class with a clear understanding that the production, distribution, and consumption of world music is rarely a neutral process. Fulfills College Cross Cultural Foundational Requirement.
                      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                      ANTH 063-601 East & West: A Hitchiker's Guide to the Cultural History of the Modern Worl SHETH, SUDEV WILLIAMS HALL 29 TR 0500PM-0630PM Sugar and Spices. Tea and Coffee. Opium and Cocaine. Hop aboard the Indian Ocean dhows, Chinese junks, Dutch schooners, and British and American clipper ships that made possible the rise of global capitalism, new colonial relationships, and the intensified forms of cultural change. How have the desires to possess and consume particular commodities shaped cultures and the course of modern history? This class introduces students to the cultural history of the modern world through an interdisciplinary analysis of connections between East and West, South and North. Following the circulation of commodities and the development of modern capitalism, the course examines the impact of global exchange on interactions and relationships between regions, nations, cultures, and peoples and the influences on cultural practices and meanings. The role of slavery and labor migrations, colonial and imperial relations, and struggles for economic and political independence are also considered. From the role of spices in the formation of European joint stock companies circa 1600 to the contemporary cocaine trade, the course's use of both original primary sources and secondary readings written by historians and anthropologists will enable particular attention to the ways that global trade has impacted social, cultural, and political formations and practices throughout the world.
                        Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                        ANTH 086-301 DESIRE AND DEMAND DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 M 0200PM-0500PM Does consumption shape culture or does culture shape consumption? As even the most mundane purchase becomes socially symbolic and culturally meaningful we can persuasively argue that the concept of "need" has been transformed. Analyzing a variety of physical and virtual consumer venues, the goal of this seminar is to understand and to analyze historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. We investigate social and political-economic factors that impact when and how people purchase goods and argue that behavior attached to consumption includes a nexus of influences that may change periodically in response to external factors. Readings and research assignments are interdisciplinary and require a critical analysis of global/local linkages. The city of Philadelphia becomes the seminar's laboratory as we ask: how have issues of culture, consumption, and global capitalism become intertwined around the world?
                          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; FOR FRESHMEN ONLY; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                          ANTH 113-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF EAST ASIA NISHIMURA, YOKO WILLIAMS HALL 306 MW 0200PM-0330PM This is an introductory survey course on the ancient societies and civilizations of East Asia, especially in the areas known today as Japan, China, and Korea. This course will explore the general lifeway of the peoples in these regions during the prehistoric periods, specifically from the Mesolithic/Neolithic periods about 8,000 BC up to the era of political unification around 700 AD in both the Japanese archipelago and the Korean peninsula. By examining primarily the art and architecture of these prehistoric societies, this course will explore important sociocultural aspects, including subsistence, sedentism, state formation, social stratification, leadership, warfare, trade, technology, population movement, and mortuary custom. The course aims to provide a thorough foundation for further study in the histories and cultures of ancient Japan, China, and Korea.
                            ANTH 122-001 BECOMING HUMAN MONGE, JANET UNIVERSITY MUSEUM B17 TR 0130PM-0300PM Human evolutionary studies is a composite product of the fieldwork of both Paleolithic archaeology and human paleontology (or what we refer to as "stones and bones"). This marriage of two subdisciplines of anthropology produces a unique set of data that is intellectually managed and driven by theories within anthropology as a whole and even beyond -- to fields such as biology, psychology, and primate ethology, as we try to understand the origins of language, culture, and our unique physical characteristics. In this course, we will jointly discuss and debate the actual evidence of human evolution, describing what the actual evidence is and exploring how far can we take these interpretations.
                              Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                              ANTH 122-601 BECOMING HUMAN LEADER, GEORGE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 W 0530PM-0830PM Human evolutionary studies is a composite product of the fieldwork of both Paleolithic archaeology and human paleontology (or what we refer to as "stones and bones"). This marriage of two subdisciplines of anthropology produces a unique set of data that is intellectually managed and driven by theories within anthropology as a whole and even beyond -- to fields such as biology, psychology, and primate ethology, as we try to understand the origins of language, culture, and our unique physical characteristics. In this course, we will jointly discuss and debate the actual evidence of human evolution, describing what the actual evidence is and exploring how far can we take these interpretations.
                                Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                                ANTH 123-001 COMMUNICATION & CULTURE AGHA, ASIF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 MW 1000AM-1100AM The course looks at varieties of human expression -- such as art, film, language and song -- as communicative practices that connect persons together to form a common culture. Discussion is centered around particular case studies and ethnographic examples. Examination of communicative practices in terms of the types of expressive signs they employ, their capacity to formulate and transmit cultural beliefs and ideals (such as conceptions of politics, nature, and self), and to define the size and characteristics of groups and communities sharing such ideals. Discussion of the role of media, social institutions, and technologies of communication (print, electronic). Emphasis on contemporary communicative practices and the forms of culture that emerge in the modern world.
                                  Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
                                  ANTH 143-001 BEING HUMAN: BIOLOGY, CULTURE, & HUMAN DIVERSITY SCHURR, THEODORE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will investigate human biology from evolutionary and biocultural perspectives. Using this approach, the class will explore what it means to be human. We will examine humans as mammals, as primates, and as hominins (our own lineage). We will also study the basics of human genetics, growth and development, immune function, nutrition, life history, and adaptations to diet and disease. In addition, we will review biological variation in contemporary and past societies and the evolutionary processes that helped to shape them.
                                    ANTH 148-401 FOOD AND FIRE MOORE, KATHERINE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 MW 1030AM-1200PM This course will let students explore the essential heritage of human technology through archaeology. People have been transforming their environment from the first use of fire for cooking. Since then, humans have adapted to the world they created using the resources around them. We use artifacts to understand how the archaeological record can be used to trace breakthroughs such as breaking stone and bone, baking bread, weaving cloth and firing pottery and metals. The seminar will meet in the Penn Museum's Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials. Students will become familiar with the Museum's collections and the scientific methods used to study different materials. Class sessions will include discussions, guest presentations, museum field trips, and hands-on experience in the laboratory.
                                      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES ONLY
                                      ANTH 201-401 DOING RESEARCH: DOING RESEARCH: QUALITATIVE METHODS AND RESEARCH DESIGN MITCHELL, LISA VAN PELT LIBRARY 551 MW 0200PM-0330PM This interdisciplinary course introduces students to qualitative research methods and frameworks in the social sciences and humanities. Students will learn how to frame an effective research question, situate it in relation to existing research, select the most appropriate methods for addressing the question, and develop an effective research plan. Each week students will be introduced to a new set of frameworks for analysis, see specific examples of their application drawn from anthropological, historical, and related scholarship and have opportunities to practice applying and evaluating the strengths and weaknesses of specific methodological tools. The goals of the semester will be for each student to develop their own research proposal for a specific project. Students will be introduced to a range of textual, archival and media collections and databases available at Penn, with particular attention to South Asia and other specific regions of interest to course participants. Students will also have the opportunity to identify sources of funding for summer and/or thesis research projects, and submit applications for these opportunities as part of the course. The course is ideal for students considering summer research, an undergraduate thesis, or an application to the Fulbright or other research program. It may be taken by itself as a freestanding course, or may be sequenced with SAST 209, Writing Research, the following fall semester.
                                        ANTH 204-301 THEORETICAL FOUNDATIONS CESARIO, CHRISTA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 0130PM-0300PM Ever wonder what the point was of reading the "founding fathers" of the discipline (and yes, they were most often fathers)? Ever feel like the "old stuff" and the "old questions" have no relevance to your contemporary interests? This course, designed primarily for cultural anthropology majors, will provide clues. This is NOT a comprehensive history of the discipline. Instead, we will examine some of the main issues that have been foundational to anthropology, and will explore how approaches to these issues have changed over time. To do so, we will contextualize our analysis of transformations in anthropological knowledge production within historical and contemporary political economies. By exploring core issues that continue to inspire and inform anthropological theory and ethnographic practice, we will solidify our commitment to a holistic and relational understanding of social processes.
                                          ANTH 213-601 LOCAL BIOLOGIES JOINER, MICHAEL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 M 0430PM-0730PM This seminar explores anthropological perspectives on the interactions between biological and cultural systems. The goal of the seminar is to move beyond human experience as symbolic construction, and to understand how biology and pathology are expressed through and embedded in social relations and experience. We consider recent classificatory shifts in the sciences of human nature, the vexed dynamic between objectivity and uncertainty, and the ways in which scientific knowledge informs moral categories and social thought. Topics include the placebo response in sociosomatic medicine; the anthropology of the human life-span; biological anthropological perspectives on health and behavior; the uses of racial classification in medicine; eugenics, the new genetics; biotechnology in the context of epidemics and inequalities; and the role of anthropology in bioethics.
                                            ANTH 220-601 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 F 0630PM-0930PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                              Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                              ANTH 220-602 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                ANTH 220-603 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 219. Students may enroll in either or both courses, and in any sequence; however, preference will be given to those previously enrolled in ANTH 219 that Fall. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays or Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                  ANTH 234-301 PHARMA & GLOBAL HEALTH JOINER, MICHAEL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 TR 1030AM-1200PM In some parts of the world, spending on pharmaceuticals is astronomical. In others, people do not have access to basic or life-saving drugs. Individuals struggle to afford medications; whole populations are neglected, considered too poor to constitute profitable markets for the development and distribution of necessary drugs. This seminar analyzes the dynamics of the burgeoning international pharmaceutical trade and the global inequalities that emerge from and are reinforced by market-driven medicine. Questions about who will be treated and who will not filter through every phase of pharmaceutical production --from preclinical research to human testing, marketing, distribution, prescription, and consumption. Whether considering how the pharmaceutical industry shapes popular understandings of mental illness in North America and Great Britain, how Brazil has created a model of HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment program, or how the urban pooer in Delhi understand and access healthcare, the seminar draws on anthropological case studies to illuminate the roles of corporations, governments, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in relation to global pharmaceuticals. As we analyze each case and gain famliarity with tehnographic methods, we will ask how individual and group health is shaped by new medical technologies and their evolving regulatory regimes and markets. The course familiarizes students with critical debates on globalization and with local responses to globalizing processes; and it contributes to ethical and political debates on the development and access to new medical technologies.
                                                    ANTH 267-401 LIVING WORLD IN ARCHAEOLOGICAL SCIENCE MONGE, JANET
                                                    MOORE, KATHERINE
                                                    WHITE, CHANTEL
                                                    UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 190 TR 1200PM-0130PM By focusing on the scientific analysis of archaeological remains, this course will explore life and death in the past. It takes place in the Center for the Analysis of Archaeological Materials (CAAM) and is team taught in three modules: human skeletal analysis, analysis of animal remains, and analysis of plant remains. Each module will combine laboratory and classroom exercises to give students hands-on experience with archaeological materials. We will examine how organic materials provide key information about past environments, human behavior, and cultural change through discussions of topics such as health and disease, inequality, and food.
                                                      OBJECTS-BASED LEARNING COURSE; CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO
                                                      ANTH 276-301 ETHNO APP TO URBN ATHLET SUESS, GRETCHEN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB PC-L1 TR 1030AM-1200PM Rooted in the rubric of public interest social science, the course focuses on bridging theory and practice motivated by a commitment to social justice through original ethnographic research. In particular, this course will focus on kinesiology and the anthropology of sports and well-being through intense analysis of the Young Quakers Community Athletics (YQCA) program, a collaboration between the Netter Center for Community Partnerships and Penn Athletics. In guest lecturers from multiple disciplines will help to round out the course. The core learning objective is to bring a broad range of specialized expertise to foster a holistic examination of a complex institutional partnership intended to promote positive social transformation and improved human health and well-being.
                                                        AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                                        ANTH 297-301 NATUR CULTUR ENVIRONMENT ANAND, NIKHIL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 328 TR 1030AM-1200PM In Spring 2018, this course is specially designed to appeal to students with interests in urban studies and environmental studies across different disciplines. We will explore the natures, cultures and environmentalisms of cities by exploring the matter of urban water. Cities have long been made through historic projects to tame the unruly relations between land and water. As the catastrophic human disasters in Houston, Florida and Puerto Rico have recently shown, these relations are today everywhere being unsettled and exacerbated by climate change. In cities as diverse as Philadelphia and Mumbai, climate change promises to exacerbate social inequalities and further squeeze non-human natures. How is the urban environment produced, magnified, divided and shrunk with water? In these times, how might we make space for social justice and non-human natures in and along rising urban waters? This course is the first of a two-course sequence on urban waters and climate change, and is part of Rising Waters, a comparative research project in the Environmental Humanities. The course will feature field trips in Philadelphia, as well as guest lectures by urban professionals, environmental experts and activists. Students successfully completing the course will have the opportunity to apply to travel to India in December 2018 to conduct original research with their peers in Philadelphia and Mumbai.
                                                          BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                          ANTH 298-050 COMMUNICATION IN SMALL GROUPS
                                                            STUDY ABROAD
                                                            ANTH 298-051 COMPARATIVE PUBLIC POLICY: THE SWEDISH MODEL AND THE EU
                                                              STUDY ABROAD
                                                              ANTH 298-052 HEALTHCARE IN SWEDEN AND THE U.S.
                                                                STUDY ABROAD
                                                                ANTH 298-053 FOOD AND CULTURE
                                                                  STUDY ABROAD
                                                                  ANTH 298-054 GLOBALIZATION
                                                                    STUDY ABROAD
                                                                    ANTH 298-055 GLOBALIZATION AND CULTURE
                                                                      STUDY ABROAD
                                                                      ANTH 298-056 PEOPLE AND CULTURES IN SOUTHEAST ASIA
                                                                        STUDY ABROAD
                                                                        ANTH 298-057 ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIAL CHANGE
                                                                          STUDY ABROAD
                                                                          ANTH 298-058 GLOBAL FASHION BUSINESS SYSTEM
                                                                            STUDY ABROAD
                                                                            ANTH 298-059 CULTURE IDENTITIES AND ARTS
                                                                              STUDY ABROAD
                                                                              ANTH 298-060 PROTECTION OF CULTURAL ARTIFACTS
                                                                                STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                ANTH 298-061 GENDER AND SEXUALITY IN MODERN GREEK CULTURE
                                                                                  STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                  ANTH 298-062 CULTURAL BOUNDARIES AND IDENTITIES
                                                                                    STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                    ANTH 298-063 IDENTITY AND PLACE
                                                                                      STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                      ANTH 298-064 DESIGN AND EVALUATION OF SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY PROJECTS
                                                                                        STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                        ANTH 298-065 STORYTELLING: LANGUAGE AND MOVEMENT
                                                                                          STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                          ANTH 298-066 THEATRE FOR SOCIAL CHANGE AND INNOVATION
                                                                                            STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                            ANTH 298-067 MAORI SOCIETY
                                                                                              STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                              ANTH 298-068 REPRESENTATIONS OF AFRICA
                                                                                                STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                ANTH 298-069 UNCOVERING THE PAST
                                                                                                  STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                  ANTH 298-070 INDIGENOUS MATERIAL CULTURE-OBJECTS AND THEIR JOURNEY
                                                                                                    STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                    ANTH 298-071 CULTURES OF CYBERSPACE
                                                                                                      STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                      ANTH 298-072 CULTURAL BOUNDARIES AND SOCIETIES
                                                                                                        STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                        ANTH 303-601 RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY SUESS, GRETCHEN DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB PC-L1 M 0530PM-0830PM This undergraduate seminar is about how ethnographers do research. It introduces fundamental concepts and techniques - research design, participant observation, interviews, questionnaires, field notes, archives, data collection and analysis. It also addresses ethical and legal issues- cultural protocols, intellectual property rights, collaborative anthropology, and institutional review boards. Students will conduct original ethnographic research in partnership with the Netter Center.
                                                                                                          AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                                                                                                          ANTH 347-301 ANTH OF CORPORATIONS NEWBERRY, DEREK UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 T 0300PM-0600PM Modern business corporations can be characterized as having their own internal cultures, more or less distinct from one another. They also exist within encompassing cultures and cultural flows. At the same time, corporations are producers and disseminators, and thus have effects on their surrounding environments, effects that extend from the local to the global. This course examines modern corporations from these three perspectives through theoretical and ethnographic readings, guest speakers from the corporate world, and independent research conducted by the students. Course requirements include student presentations of their research and readings; one or more take-home exams; and a final research paper.
                                                                                                            BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                                                                            ANTH 359-401 NUTRITIONAL ANTHROPOLOGY ROVNER, ALISHA CLAIRE M. FAGIN HALL (NURSING 114 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will explore the significance as it relates to food behaviors and nutritional status in contemporary human populations. The topics covered will be examined from a biocultural perspective and include 1) definition and functions of nutrients and how different cultures perceive nutrients, 2) basic principles of human growth and development, 3) methods to assess dietary intake, 4) food taboos, 5) feeding practices of infants and children, 6) food marketing, 7) causes and consequences of under- and over-nutrition, and 8) food insecurity and hunger.
                                                                                                              ANTH 386-601 CULTURE, PRODUCTION, AND CONSUMPTION IN THE GLOBAL MARKETPLACE DIGGS-THOMPSON, MARILYNNE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 W 0530PM-0830PM The goal of this course is to understand and to investigate both historical and contemporary issues related to a culture of consumption. Reading topics cover both contemporary and scholarly issues in cultural anthropology, popular culture, consumer behavior, off-shore production, social networking, media and communications, financial and real estate markets and marketing. Class distinctions are equally interdisciplinary as we focus on investigating and identifying critical global/local linkages. We analyze the various ways in which Philadelphia and other "global cities" are competing for consumer revenues. We ask what factors have led contemporary society reaching its current stage of mass consumption and how have certain goods and services been reconfigured, packaged or re-packaged to attract new consumers. In order to better understand the link between consumption and production factors we explore the relationship between outsourcing and/or offshore production and modern consumption. Approximately sixty percent of the seminar takes place in the classroom and will include lecture, class discussion, and films. The remaining portion of the class meetings will involve local and regional travel. Research assignments emphasize the use of anthropological participant-observation techniques to investigate the relationships between culture and contemporary mass consumption within the contexts of re-gentrification, urbanization, and globalization.
                                                                                                                CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                                                                                                                ANTH 394-401 NGOS & HUMANITARIANISM CESARIO, CHRISTA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 TR 1030AM-1200PM How are non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and various humanitarian assistance projects playing a role in the lives of people across the globe? While focusing primarily (but not exclusively) on the African continent, this course will examine the rise of non-governmental bodies as political, economic, and social actors in an increasingly globalized, neoliberal world. Through a variety of theoretical discussions and case studies, we will discuss issues such as: the relationship of NGOs to governmental institutions, the ethical considerations of humanitarian assistance, the politics of "development," the ebb and flow of international aid money, the intersection of capitalism and NGOs, and the impact of humanitarian projects on local cultural processes. Students will leave this course with not only a better understanding of the complex webs of NGO interventions across the world, but will also cultivate a critical awareness of the potential problems raised by such institutions and their broader networks.
                                                                                                                  ANTH 402-301 RSRCH SKILLS GLBL HLTH: APPLIED RESEARCH SKILLS IN GLOBAL COMMUNITY HEALTH BREAM, KENT
                                                                                                                  BARG, FRANCES
                                                                                                                  HARNWELL COLLEGE HOUSE M10 W 0200PM-0330PM While political borders remain, social and human borders fall with the increasing movement of people, ideas, and resources across geographies. What is global becomes local. While biomedical and counting sciences advance, the human experience and influence remain core to understanding behavior, beliefs, and awareness. What is human remains paramount. The Maya Western Highlands of Guatemala are undergoing health changes (trauma, maternal-infant health, diabetes, mental health) through economic development and continued human migration to and from the US. The Cobbs Creek neighborhood in West Philadelphia is also facing epidemics of non-communicable diseases. In this context, Applied Skills in Global Community Health will provide academic and professional skills development in understanding the role of culture, history and politics in the health of a population in transition (demographic, nutritional, epidemiologic, economic). Classroom work will occur in the spring of each year combined with a short (1 wk) or long term(10 wk) field experiences in the Western Highlands of Guatemala. In addition students will examine health and community research in the Cobbs Creek neighborhood of West Philadelphia. Participation in field work required, Spanish language proficiency required for 10 week field school option
                                                                                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                    ANTH 403-301 ECOLOGIES OF TRANSLATION: CONSUMPTION, WASTE, & ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE HATMAKER, MELISSA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 TR 0300PM-0430PM The things we buy, carry around, use, enjoy, and throw away connect our bodies to lives and ecologies around the world. This class will examine how consuming,living with, and disposing of material objects draws us into a conversation - however partial and limited - with different people, cultures, and environments. We will trace two key sites of translation: when natural resources become consumer goods, and when goods become or create wastes. What stories are told to make sense of these ecological alterations? How do these material translations relate to social and cultural histories, ideas, andbeliefs? How does our use of certain things in everyday life connect to the lived experiences of others and to environmental change, and in what specific ways? As new technology, free trade, and deregulation accelerate the speed and complexity with which things and ideas flow across borders, it becomes necessary for scholars to pay attention to the consequences (increasing economic inequality, ecological crises, disasters, environmental racism and injustice, and unethical working conditions in factories producing consumer goods, to name a few) of these changes. In this course we will read texts, writjournals and essays, and participate in discussions of the effects of this globnetwork of producing, buying, and disposing, paying close attention to the often overlooked or forgotten places where American waste and toxins end up: in poor and marginalized communities. We will consider the how these patterns stem from legacies of colonialism, imperialism, racism, and gender inequality. We will engage with writings, films, art, and everyday objects to better understand how the movement of physical stuff connects us to diverse ecologies and their material histories, always in a process of translation.
                                                                                                                      ANTH 508-401 CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT OF ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITES AND LANDSCAPES MATERO, FRANK
                                                                                                                      ERICKSON, CLARK
                                                                                                                      FURNESS BUILDING 65 W 0200PM-0500PM
                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                        ANTH 547-401 ANTHROPOLOGY & EDUCATION POSECZNICK, ALEXANDER EDUCATION BUILDING 007 M 1000AM-1200PM An introduction to the intent, approach, and contribution of anthropology to the study of socialization and schooling in cross-cultural perspective. Education is examined in traditional, colonial, and complex industrial societies.
                                                                                                                          ANTH 553-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF EAST ASIA NISHIMURA, YOKO WILLIAMS HALL 306 MW 0200PM-0330PM
                                                                                                                            ANTH 602-301 EVOLUTIONARY ANTHROPOLOGY SCHURR, THEODORE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 T 0130PM-0430PM This course will explore various subfields of biological anthropology to better understand what it means to be human. Special attention will be paid to current issues and problems in these subfields, and the different ways in which researchers are attempting to understand and uncover the details of human evolution. Among the areas that are explored in this course are paleoanthropology, primatology, human biology, molecular anthropology, evolutionary medicine, epigenetics, and human life history. Specific issues to be explored include the primate roots of human behavior, brain and language evolution, new fossil hominins, the origins of anatomically modern humans, and modern human migration history.
                                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                              ANTH 617-301 CONTEMPORARY APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF CULTURE & SOCIETY ANAND, NIKHIL UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 R 0200PM-0500PM A critical examination of recent history and theory in cultural and social anthropology. Topics include structural-functionalism; symbolic anthropology; post-modern theory. Emphasis is on major schools and trends in America, Britain, and France.
                                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                ANTH 643-640 MLA Proseminar: Globalization and Its Historical Significance SPOONER, BRIAN UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 M 0530PM-0810PM Globalization is one of the most comprehensive topics of our time, and also one of the most controversial. This course assesses the current state of globalization, considering it in terms of economic, political, and cultural change, and follows its progress through the semester. The class will be led through the main topics and debates, introduced to conceptual and empirical tools for framing academic discussion and research about its dynamics, how and when it began, and (most particularly) how it differs from earlier episodes of historical change.
                                                                                                                                  ANTH 694-401 NGOS & HUMANITARIANISM CESARIO, CHRISTA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 TR 1030AM-1200PM How are non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and various humanitarian assistance projects playing a role in the lives of people across the globe? While focusing primarily (but not exclusively) on the African continent, this course will examine the rise of non-governmental bodies as political, economic, and social actors in an increasingly globalized, neoliberal world. Through a variety of theoretical discussions and case studies, we will discuss issues such as: the relationship of NGOs to governmental institutions, the ethical considerations of humanitarian assistance, the politics of "development," the ebb and flow of international aid money, the intersection of capitalism and NGOs, and the impact of humanitarian projects on local cultural processes. Students will leave this course with not only a better understanding of the complex webs of NGO interventions across the world, but will also cultivate a critical awareness of the potential problems raised by such institutions and their broader networks.
                                                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                    ANTH 709-301 CURNT RSRCH IN PALEOANTH DIBBLE, HAROLD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 427 W 0200PM-0500PM An intensive review of the major topics relating to Pleistocene human evolution, focusing on the integration of data from both biology and archeology.
                                                                                                                                      CONTACT DEPT or INSTRUCTOR FOR CLASSRM INFO; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                                                                                                                      ANTH 720-601 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 F 0630PM-0930PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                        ANTH 720-602 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0900AM-1200PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                          ANTH 720-603 ARCHY LAB FIELD PROJECT SCHUYLER, ROBERT UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 329 S 0100PM-0400PM Follow-up for ANTH 719 and parallel course to ANTH 220. Class will meet in three hour sections on Fridays and Saturdays and will involve the analysis of artifacts, documentary records, oral historic sources and period illustrations collected on Southern New Jersey historic sites that Fall. No previous archaeological or lab experience is required. (Robert L. Schuyler: schuyler@sas.upenn.edu; (215) 898-6965; UMuseum 412). Course may be repeated for credit.
                                                                                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                            ANTH 730-301 RDGS & RES IN LING ANTH: Readings and Research in Linguistic Anthropology AGHA, ASIF UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 410 R 0900AM-1200PM The course is designed for students and faculty interested in discussing current research and/or research topics in any area of linguistic or semiotic anthropology. The primary intent of the course is to familiarize students with the literature on selected research topics and to develop their own research agendas in the light of the literature. Students may enroll on an S/U basis for 0.5 CU per semester. The course may be repeated for credit up to 4 times.
                                                                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                                              ANTH 733-301 RACE, AN ANTHROPOLOGICAL INTERROGATION, COLLOQUIUM 2016-2017 LEVENTHAL, RICHARD
                                                                                                                                              THOMAS, DEBORAH
                                                                                                                                              UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 M 1200PM-0300PM This seminar is a critical exploration of the concept of extinction as it is being understood, witnessed, and/or debated in the early 21st century. What kind of decisions and actions are made on the basis of something -a way of life, a language, or a body of evidence - that is said to be disappearing? Answers to the question of extinction often exceed theoretical frames, making extinction, near-extinction, and the "hour" of extinction, for that matter, not at all transparent phenomena. An anthropological "four-field" approach will help navigate this boundary object and the complex empirical realities it entails. Topics include biodiversity loss and extinction events, language endangerment and cultural and ethnic genocide; sex-selection and femicide, end-of-life ethics and care; climate change and food insecurity, the extinction of diseases & the emergence of new ones, "salvage anthropology" and colonial legacies, and war and contemporary heritage loss. The course consists of short papers, engagements with colloquium speakers, as well as an end-of-year graduate student colloquium. Open to second year anthropology graduate students. Other interested students should contact the instructors for permission before enrolling.
                                                                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION