Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ARTH 100-301 ARTS AT PENN: The Afterlife of Things OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT FURNESS BUILDING DSR R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies.
    FOR FRESHMEN ONLY; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
    ARTH 101-001 Introduction to Western Art & Civilization: Origins to Renaissance OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111 MW 1100AM-1200PM This is a double introduction: to looking at the visual arts; and, to the ancient and medieval cities and empires of three continents - ancient Egypt, the Middle East and Iran, the Minoan and Mycenaean Bronze Age, the Greek and Roman Mediterranean, and the early Islamic, early Byzantine and western Medieval world. Using images, contemporary texts, and art in our city, we examine the changing forms of art, architecture and landscape architecture, and the roles of visual culture for political, social and religious activity.
      Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
      ARTH 101-601 Introduction to Western Art & Civilization: Prehistory to Renaissance MEIBERG, LINDA UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 330 MW 0530PM-0700PM This is a double introduction: to looking at the visual arts; and, to the ancient and medieval cities and empires of three continents - ancient Egypt, the Middle East and Iran, the Minoan and Mycenaean Bronze Age, the Greek and Roman Mediterranean, and the early Islamic, early Byzantine and western Medieval world. Using images, contemporary texts, and art in our city, we examine the changing forms of art, architecture and landscape architecture, and the roles of visual culture for political, social and religious activity.
        Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
        ARTH 106-001 ARCHITECT AND HISTORY HASELBERGER, LOTHAR STITELER HALL B26 MWF 0100PM-0200PM Human experience is shaped by the built environment. This course introduces students to the interrelated fields of architecture, art history, and engineering and explores great architectural monuments from the ancient to the modern period, from India across the Mediterranean and Europe to the US. The focus will be on understanding these works in their structure and function, both as products of individual ingenuity and reflections of Zeitgeist. Questioning these monuments from a present-day perspective across the cultures will be an important ingredient, as will be podium discussions, guest lectures, excursions, and all kinds of visualizations, from digital walk-throughs to practical design exercises. Regularly taught in fall term, this course fulfills Sector IV, Humanities and Social Science, and it satisfies History of Art 100-level course requirements. There is only ONE recitation in this course, attached directly to Friday's class at 2-3 p.m., in order to provide sufficient time for practica and field trips.
          Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
          ARTH 109-601 WORLD FILM HIST '45-PRES CONSOLATI, CLAUDIA ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111 T 0430PM-0730PM Focusing on movies made after 1945, this course allows students to learn and to sharpen methods, terminologies, and tools needed for the critical analysis of film. Beginning with the cinematic revolution signaled by the Italian Neo-Realism (of Rossellini and De Sica), we will follow the evolution of postwar cinema through the French New Wave (of Godard, Resnais, and Varda), American movies of the 1950s and 1960s (including the New Hollywood cinema of Coppola and Scorsese), and the various other new wave movements of the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s (such as the New German Cinema). We will then selectively examine some of the most important films of the last two decades, including those of U.S. independent film movement and movies from Iran, China, and elsewhere in an expanding global cinema culture. There will be precise attention paid to formal and stylistic techniques in editing, mise-en-scene, and sound, as well as to the narrative, non-narrative, and generic organizations of film.
          • CINE102601
          • COML124601
          • ENGL092601
          Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
          ARTH 141-401 POLICY,MUSEUMS&CUL HERIT LEVENTHAL, RICHARD UNIVERSITY MUSEUM 345 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will focus upon and examine the ethics of international heritage and the role that Museums play in the preservation of identity and cultural heritage. The mission of this course will be to inform and educate students about the role of Museums within the 21st century. What is the role and position of antiquities and important cultural objects in Museums? How should Museums acquire these objects and when should they be returned to countries and cultural groups? Examples from current issues will be included in the reading and discussions along with objects and issues within Penn Museum.
          • ANTH141401
          • COMM141401
          ARTH 212-401 CITES & TEMP IN ANC IND MEISTER, MICHAEL JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0300PM-0430PM The wooden architecture of ancient India's cities is represented in relief carvings from Buddhist religious monuments of the early centuries A.D. and replicated in remarkable excavated cave cathedrals. This course will trace that architectural tradition, its transformation into a symbolic vocabulary for a new structure, the Hindu temple, and the development of the temple in India from ca. 500-1500 A.D.
          • ARTH612401
          • SAST201401
          • SAST501401
          ARTH 213-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF E. ASIA NISHIMURA, YOKO JAFFE BUILDING B17 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course introduces the major artistic traditions of Japan, from the Neolithic period to the present, and teaches the fundamental methods of the discipline of art history. Special attention will be given to the places of Shinto, the impact of Buddhism, and their related architectures and sculptures; the principles of narrative illustration; the changing roles of aristocratic, monastic, shogunal and merchant patronage; the formation of the concept of the artist over time; and the transformation of tradition in the modern age.
          • ARTH613401
          • EALC157401
          • EALC557401
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 217-401 CHINESE PAINTING STEINHARDT, NANCY WILLIAMS HALL 421 MW 1100AM-1200PM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting style forms the basis of analysis, and themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social and cultural issues. The class pays particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to look at paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, PMA and/or local collections.
          • ARTH617401
          • EALC227401
          • EALC627401
          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
          ARTH 224-401 ART OF MESOPOTAMIA PITTMAN, HOLLY JAFFE BUILDING 113 TR 0900AM-1030AM A survey of the art of Mesopotamia from 4000 B.C. through the conquest of Alexander the Great.
          • ARTH624401
          ARTH 225-401 GREEK ART AND ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN JAFFE BUILDING 104 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2rd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engaged viewer's emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss how art and space was considered, along with ideas of invention and progress, the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.
          • ARTH625401
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 232-401 BYZANTINE ART & ARCH OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT CANCELED This course surveys the arts of Byzantium from the fall of Rome to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Study of major monuments, including icons, mosaics, architecture, and ivories provide us with an overview of this rich artistic culture. We pay special attention to the role of the Orthodox Church and liturgy in the production and reception of art works. Weekly recitation sections focus on selected major issues, such as the relationship of art to the Holy, the uses and abuses of Iconoclasm, and imperial patronage. The course also grapples with the Empire's relationship to other cultures by looking at the impact of the Christian Crusades and Moslem invasions - as well as Byzantium's crucial impact on European art (e.g., in Sicily, Spain).
          • AAMW632401
          • ARTH632401
          ARTH 235-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD HOLOD, RENATA JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1200PM-0130PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
          • AAMW635401
          • ARTH635401
          • VLST235401
          Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 240-401 MEDIEVAL ART JUNG, TANYA JAFFE BUILDING 104 MWF 1200PM-0100PM An introductory survey, this course investigates painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students become familiar with selected major monuments of the Late Antique, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as primary textual sources. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the aesthetic status of art and the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.
          • AAMW640401
          • ARTH640401
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 250-401 Visual Arts of the Italian Renaissance KIM, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING B17 MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course explores the painting, sculpture, architecture, and other media (textiles, prints, and even armor) from the historical eras conventionally known as the Early and High Renaissance, Mannerism, and Counter Reformation. We consider the work of such artists as Cimabue, Duccio, Giotto, and Mantegna as well as the careers, personalities and reception of Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian. With emphasis placed upon artists' cultivation of particular styles, we look closely at works originating from various contexts: political (city-states, princely courts, and the Papal States); spatial / topographic (inner chambers of private palaces, family chapels, church facades, and public squares); and geographic (Florence, Siena, Rome, Naples, Venice, and Milan). Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and analyzes contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources.
          • ARTH650401
          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 270-401 THE MODERN CITY BROWNLEE, DAVID ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111 MWF 1000AM-1100AM A study of the European and American city in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the history of architecture and urban design; political, sociological, and economic factors also receive attention. The class considers the development of London, St. Petersburg, Washington, Boston, Paris, Vienna and Philadelphia.
          • ARTH670401
          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
          ARTH 276-401 IMPRESSIONISM DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A4 MW 0200PM-0300PM Impressionism opened the pictorial field to light, perception, science, modernity, bourgeoise leisure and famously the material qualities of paint itself. This course will survey the movement's major contexts and proponents--Manet, Monet, Morisot, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin--from its origins in the 1860's to its demise in the 1890's, as well as its subsequent adaptions throughout the world until World War I. Particular attention is paid to the artists' critical reception and the historical conditions which allowed one nation, France, to claim the emergence of early Modernism so firmly for itself. The course also analyzes the effects of the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Paris, and its affects on artistic developments. We also look outside of France's borders to Germany and Britain.
          • ARTH676401
          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
          ARTH 278-601 AMERICAN ART SHAW, GWENDOLYN LAB-STRUC OF MATTER AUD W 0430PM-0730PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it.
          • ARTH678601
          CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
          ARTH 296-601 Introduction to Contemporary Art: 1945-Present PINAR, EKIN WILLIAMS HALL 202 R 0500PM-0800PM Many people experience the art of our time as bewildering, shocking, too ordinary (my kid could do that), too intellectual (elitist), or simply not as art. Yet what makes this art engaging is that it raises the question of what art is or can be, employs a range of new materials and technologies, and addresses previously excluded audiences. It invades non-art spaces, blurs the boundaries between text and image, document and performance, asks questions about institutional frames (the museum, gallery, and art journal), and generates new forms of criticism. Much of the "canon" of what counts as important is still in flux, especially for the last twenty years. And the stage is no longer centered only on the United States and Europe, but is becoming increasingly global. The course will introduce students to the major movements and artists of the post-war period, with emphasis on social and historical context, critical debates, new media, and the changing role of the spectator/participant.
            ARTH 300-301 Undergraduate Methods Seminar SILVERMAN, KAJA JAFFE BUILDING 113 T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies.
              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
              ARTH 301-401 INVISIBLE SUBJECTS IN 20TH-CENTURY ART AND LITERATURE LEVY, AARON FISHER-BENNETT HALL 323 MW 0200PM-0330PM Topic varies.
              • CINE263401
              • ENGL263401
              ARTH 301-402 HISTORY OF COMPUTER ANIMATION SIMENSKY, LINDA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 M 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies.
              • CINE320402
              • ENGL291402
              • FNAR320402
              ARTH 302-301 UNDERGRADUATE SEMINAR: THE DARKER SIDE OF THE RENAISSANCE WEST, ASHLEY COLLEGE HALL 311F R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies.
                ARTH 302-401 PARIS THEN AND NOW BIRCH, EUGENIE
                DEJEAN, JOAN
                CANCELED Topic varies.
                • CPLN300401
                • FREN300401
                BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                ARTH 302-402 GREAT ARCH. MNMTS INDIA: CU IN INDIA: GREAT ARCHITECTURAL MONUMENTS OF INDIA CANCELED Topic varies.
                  YEAR LONG COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                  ARTH 388-301 Spiegel-Wilks Seminar in Contemporary Art: Carrie Mae Weems at the ICA SHAW, GWENDOLYN JAFFE BUILDING 113 R 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies.
                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                    ARTH 391-401 TOPICS FILM STUDIES: CINEMA & GLOBALIZATION MAZAJ, META FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 TR 1030AM-1200PM Topic varies.
                    • CINE201401
                    • COML201401
                    • ENGL291401
                    ARTH 501-301 CURATORIAL SEMINAR: IMAGE & POLITICS, C. 1900-DREYFUS AFFAIR ST.GEORGE, ROBERT
                    DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE
                    VAN PELT LIBRARY 627 T 1100AM-0200PM Spring 2015: Practiced in almost all ancient cultures, magic offered ways of managing or understanding the present, controlling supernatural agencies, and seeing the future. The objects and images associated with magical practices are rich and varied and are well represented in the University of Pennsylvania Museum. The aim of the seminar is to prepare an exhibit on magic and divination, working with the archaeological collections of the UPM, specifically the Ancient Near Eastern, Egyptian, and Mediterranean sections. It will include objects such as amulets, curse tablets, incantation bowls, and magical papyri, as well as images representing magical practices. Participating students will select and research objects and prepare wall texts for the exhibit.
                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                      ARTH 502-301 Introduction to Object-based Study MILROY, ELIZABETH
                      SILVER, LARRY
                      JAFFE BUILDING 104 T 0130PM-0430PM Topic varies
                        ARTH 504-640 Central Asian Art and Archaeology WU, XIN WILLIAMS HALL 316 M 0500PM-0800PM Topic varies
                          ARTH 513-301 UKIYO-E CANCELED Topic varies.
                            ARTH 520-401 MINOAN AND MYCENAEAN LUXURY ITEMS SHANK, ELIZABETH WILLIAMS HALL 705 T 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies. Spring 2015: Double axes, horns of consecration, and images of a prominent female goddess were powerful cult symbols for both the Minoans and the Mycenaeans. And indeed, it was originally thought that these two cultures practiced the same religion. But closer examination of textual and archaeological evidence reveals that despite the similarities in their respective iconographies, the religions had significant differences, differences that must have arisen from their different cultural backgrounds. In this course we will look at many different types of evidence Linear A and B texts, archaeological sites and mortuary remains, cult objects such as rhyta and figurines, and artistic renderings of religious scenes found on gold rings and frescoes so that together we can attempt to reconstruct the ritual practices of these religions. We will also use these physical manifestations to consider more broadly the nature not only of the Minoan and Mycenaean religions, but also of the Minoan and Mycenaean cultures. We will also come back to those similarities first noted in the artistic expression of the religions, so that we can trace the Minoan elements that do appear in Mycenaean religion, and try to understand why they were taken up by the Mycenaeans and what that adoptive behavior meant in terms of religious belief. Elements of other Aegean cultures will be explored as well as we move forward in time through the Iron Age and into the Archaic and Classical periods, in an effort to evaluate what came through from the Bronze Age into the historical periods practice of cult.
                            • AAMW520401
                            ARTH 529-401 TOPICS IN ROMAN ARCH: MODELING HERMOGENES HASELBERGER, LOTHAR JAFFE BUILDING 113 T 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies.
                            • AAMW529401
                            ARTH 571-301 MODERN ARCH THEORY BROWNLEE, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING 104 M 0200PM-0500PM A survey of architectural theory from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The discussion of original writings will be emphasized.
                              ARTH 572-640 MLA Seminar in Visual Studies: Medusa and the Power of Vision PASTORE, CHRISTOPHER JAFFE BUILDING 104 W 0600PM-0840PM Topic varies.
                              • VLST540640
                              ARTH 594-401 FICTIONS AND FRICTIONS OF POWER BERSANI, LEO FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 R 0330PM-0630PM Topic varies.
                              • CINE594401
                              • COML594401
                              • ENGL797401
                              ARTH 612-401 CITES & TEMP IN ANC IND MEISTER, MICHAEL JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 0300PM-0430PM The wooden architecture of ancient India's cities is represented in relief carvings from Buddhist religious monuments of the early centuries A.D. and replicated in remarkable excavated cave cathedrals. This course will trace that architectural tradition, its transformation into a symbolic vocabulary for a new structure, the Hindu temple, and the development of the temple in India from ca. 500-1500 A.D.
                              • ARTH212401
                              • SAST201401
                              • SAST501401
                              ARTH 613-401 ARCHAEOLOGY OF E. ASIA NISHIMURA, YOKO JAFFE BUILDING B17 MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course introduces the major artistic traditions of Japan, from the Neolithic period to the present, and teaches the fundamental methods of the discipline of art history. Special attention will be given to the places of Shinto, the impact of Buddhism, and their related architectures and sculptures; the principles of narrative illustration; the changing roles of aristocratic, monastic, shogunal and merchant patronage; the formation of the concept of the artist over time; and the transformation of tradition in the modern age.
                              • ARTH213401
                              • EALC157401
                              • EALC557401
                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ARTH 617-401 CHINESE PAINTING STEINHARDT, NANCY WILLIAMS HALL 216 MW 1100AM-1200PM Study of Chinese painting and practice from the earliest pictorial representation through the late twentieth century. Painting style forms the basis of analysis, and themes such as landscape and narrative are considered with regard to larger social and cultural issues. The class pays particular attention to the construction of the concepts of the "artist" and "art criticism" and their impact on the field into the present. Visits to look at paintings at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, PMA and/or local collections.
                              • ARTH217401
                              • EALC227401
                              • EALC627401
                              ARTH 624-401 ART OF MESOPOTAMIA PITTMAN, HOLLY JAFFE BUILDING 113 TR 0900AM-1030AM A survey of the art of Mesopotamia from 4000 B.C. through the conquest of Alexander the Great.
                              • ARTH224401
                              ARTH 625-401 GREEK ART AND ARTIFACT KUTTNER, ANN JAFFE BUILDING 104 TR 1030AM-1200PM This course surveys Greek art and artifacts from Sicily to the Black Sea from the 10th century BCE to the 2rd century BCE, including the age of Alexander and the Hellenistic Kingdoms. Public sculpture and painting on and around grand buildings and gardens, domestic luxury arts of jewelry, cups and vases, mosaic floors, and cult artefacts are discussed. Also considered are the ways in which heroic epic, religious and political themes are used to engaged viewer's emotions and served both domestic and the public aims. We discuss how art and space was considered, along with ideas of invention and progress, the role of monuments, makers and patrons in Greek society.
                              • ARTH225401
                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ARTH 632-401 BYZANTINE ART & ARCH OUSTERHOUT, ROBERT CANCELED This course surveys the arts of Byzantium from the fall of Rome to the fall of Constantinople in 1453. Study of major monuments, including icons, mosaics, architecture, and ivories provide us with an overview of this rich artistic culture. We pay special attention to the role of the Orthodox Church and liturgy in the production and reception of art works. Weekly recitation sections focus on selected major issues, such as the relationship of art to the Holy, the uses and abuses of Iconoclasm, and imperial patronage. The course also grapples with the Empire's relationship to other cultures by looking at the impact of the Christian Crusades and Moslem invasions - as well as Byzantium's crucial impact on European art (e.g., in Sicily, Spain).
                              • AAMW632401
                              • ARTH232401
                              ARTH 635-401 INTRO VIS CULT ISLAM WLD HOLOD, RENATA JAFFE BUILDING B17 TR 1200PM-0130PM A one-semester survey of Islamic art and architecture which examines visual culture as it functions within the larger sphere of Islamic culture in general. Particular attention will be given to relationships between visual culture and literature, using specific case studies, sites or objects which may be related to various branches of Islamic literature, including historical, didactic, philosophical writings, poetry and religious texts. All primary sources are available in English translation.
                              • AAMW635401
                              • ARTH235401
                              • VLST235401
                              SECTION CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ARTH 640-401 MEDIEVAL ART JUNG, TANYA JAFFE BUILDING 104 MWF 1200PM-0100PM An introductory survey, this course investigates painting, sculpture, and the "minor arts" of the Middle Ages. Students become familiar with selected major monuments of the Late Antique, Byzantine, Carolingian, Romanesque, and Gothic periods, as well as primary textual sources. Analysis of works emphasizes the cultural context, the thematic content, and the function of objects. Discussions focus especially on several key themes: the aesthetic status of art and the theological role of images; the revival of classical models and visual modes; social rituals such as pilgrimage and crusading; the cult of the Virgin and the status of women in art; and, more generally, the ideology of visual culture across the political and urban landscapes.
                              • AAMW640401
                              • ARTH240401
                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ARTH 650-401 Visual Arts of the Italian Renaissance KIM, DAVID JAFFE BUILDING B17 MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course explores the painting, sculpture, architecture, and other media (textiles, prints, and even armor) from the historical eras conventionally known as the Early and High Renaissance, Mannerism, and Counter Reformation. We consider the work of such artists as Cimabue, Duccio, Giotto, and Mantegna as well as the careers, personalities and reception of Leonardo, Raphael, Michelangelo, and Titian. With emphasis placed upon artists cultivation of particular styles, we look closely at works originating from various contexts: political (city-states, princely courts, and the Papal States); spatial / topographic (inner chambers of private palaces, family chapels, church facades, and public squares); and geographic (Florence, Siena, Rome, Naples, Venice, and Milan). Topics include artistic creativity and license, religious devotion, the revival of antiquity, observation of nature, art as problem-solving, the public reception and function of artworks, debates about style, artistic rivalry, and traveling artists. Rather than taking the form of a survey, this course selects works as paradigmatic case studies, and analyze contemporary attitudes toward art of this period through study of primary sources.
                              • ARTH250401
                              CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ARTH 670-401 THE MODERN CITY BROWNLEE, DAVID ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111 MWF 1000AM-1100AM A study of the European and American city in the eighteenth, nineteenth, and twentieth centuries. Emphasis is placed on the history of architecture and urban design; political, sociological, and economic factors also receive attention. The class considers the development of London, St. Petersburg, Washington, Boston, Paris, Vienna and Philadelphia.
                              • ARTH270401
                              SECTION CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                              ARTH 676-401 IMPRESSIONISM DOMBROWSKI, ANDRE DAVID RITTENHOUSE LAB A4 MW 0200PM-0300PM Impressionism opened the pictorial field to light, perception, science, modernity, bourgeoise leisure and famously the material qualities of paint itself. This course will survey the movement's major contexts and proponents--Manet, Monet, Morisot, Cezanne, Gauguin, Van Gogh, Rodin--from its origins in the 1860's to its demise in the 1890's, as well as its subsequent adaptions throughout the world until World War I. Particular attention is paid to the artists' critical reception and the historical conditions which allowed one nation, France, to claim the emergence of early Modernism so firmly for itself. The course also analyzes the effects of the rapidly changing social and cultural fabric of Paris, and its affects on artistic developments. We also look outside of France's borders to Germany and Britain.
                              • ARTH276401
                              SECTION CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                              ARTH 678-601 AMERICAN ART SHAW, GWENDOLYN LAB-STRUC OF MATTER AUD W 0430PM-0730PM This course surveys the most important and interesting art produced in the United States (or by American artists living abroad) up through the 1950s. This period encompasses the history of both early and modern art in the U.S., from its first appearances to its rise to prominence and institutionalization. While tracking this history, the course examines art's relation to historical processes of modernization (industrialization, the development of transportation and communications, the spread of corporate organization in business, urbanization, technological development, the rise of mass media and mass markets, etc.) and to the economic polarization, social fragmentation, political conflict, and the cultural changes these developments entailed. In these circumstances, art is drawn simultaneously toward truth and fraud, realism and artifice, science and spirituality, commodification and ephemerality, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, individualism and collectivity, the past and the future, professionalization and popularity, celebrating modern life and criticizing it.
                              • ARTH278601
                              CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN US; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE US
                              ARTH 725-401 Borderlines: Roman Provincial Culture KUTTNER, ANN JAFFE BUILDING 104 R 0430PM-0730PM Topic varies.
                              • AAMW725401
                              ARTH 735-301 Topics in Islamic Art: Vision and Optic Effects in Islamic Art HOLOD, RENATA JAFFE BUILDING 104 W 0300PM-0500PM Topic varies.
                                ARTH 740-401 TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ART CANCELED Topic varies. Spring 2015: Among the functional genres shaping religious imagery in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, the altarpiece is arguably the most important, and many of the most famous panel paintings that hang today in museums originated as components of altarpieces. The altarpiece in the Latin church bridged the divide between clergy and laypeople, between cult and devotion, between public acclaim and private interests. Such altarpieces developed into extraordinarily dynamic vehicles for staging the religious image, akin to mural painting (in its potential for narrative elaboration), and manuscript illumination (in its potential for interchanging and juxtaposing imagery). As an umbrella for diverse research projects in both medieval and Renaissance art, this seminar affords an overview of the origins, development and articulation of the altarpiece as a functional and pictorial genre in European art, on both sides of the Alps. It also seeks to provide students with the materials and practical training--technical, scholarly, interpretative-- required to study altarpieces as visual, narrative, and material totalities.
                                  ARTH 775-301 TOPICS IN 19TH C. EUROPEAN ART: NEOCLASSICISM: FROM REVOLUTION TO EMPIRE GREWE, CORDULA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 140 W 0200PM-0400PM Topic varies. Spring 2015: Despite the fact that one exhibition on Impressionism chases the next these days, the academic study of this crucial early modernist movement has slowed since the 1970s and 1980s, when new art historical paradigms (like feminism and the social history of art) were tested on Manet, Monet and their followers. This seminar seeks to understand this development but also countermand it by establishing an account of Impressionism that fits our current global, multimedia and multidisciplinary forms of humanistic thought. To this end, we will read those recent scholars who place Impressionism within new contexts that include the history of science and technology (visual perception, psychology, evolution, chemistry), political history and theory (republicanism, revolution, empire, nationalism), and consumer culture (fashion, capitalism). We will also go back to the movement s early critics (like Laforgue and Geffroy), in order to appreciate their strange metaphoric languages (which saw in Impressionism, for instance, the seeds of social upheaval or the most advanced eye in human evolution ) and make them newly useful for a 21st-century interpretation of Impressionism s true intellectual heft and radical aesthetics.
                                    ARTH 781-401 TOPICS IN 20TH C. ARCH: Does Architectural Theory Define Architectural Practice? BARNETT, JONATHAN
                                    WEISSBERG, LILIANE
                                    VAN PELT LIBRARY 302 W 0300PM-0600PM Topic varies.
                                    • COML603401
                                    ARTH 786-301 TOPICS IN 20TH C. ART POGGI, CHRISTINE JAFFE BUILDING 104 R 0130PM-0330PM Topic varies.
                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR