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Courses for Spring 2018

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Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ENVS 100-001 INTRODUCTION TO ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE PLANTE, ALAIN TR 0900AM-1030AM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems.
    Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
    ENVS 100-301 How Earth Works PLANTE, ALAIN M 1100AM-1230PM This course will explore the physical science of the Earth's environment and human interactions with it. Coverage will include the Earth's various environmental systems, various environmental problems, and the direct and indirect causes of these environmental problems.
      Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SECTION CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
      ENVS 246-401 Spirituality in the Age of Global Warming POWELL, TIMOTHY M 0200PM-0500PM We are living in the midst of one of the most severe crisis in the Earth's history. Science confirms the glaciers are melting, hurricanes are growing more intense, and the oceans are rising. But there is also a deeply spiritual dimension to global warming that does not factor into the scientific explanations. This part of the problem has been more powerfully expressed in film, literature, and art. We will be looking at films like Lee's "When the Levees Broke," about how the people of New Orleans turned to music and storytelling to rebuild their communities in the wake of Hurricane Katrina and Linda Hogan's novel, "Solar Storm" which explores how Native American women drw upon spirituality to heal their community after a dam flooded their ancestral homeland. The class will also work on an ongoing research project in partnership with th eCanadian government and Ojibwe First Nations who submitted a successful UNESCO World Heritage Site application to preserve the boreal forest and the Native people's traditional knowledge about their land. The class will be working on an interactive map to document how photographs, oral histories, and artwork helped convince UNESCO to preserve the land and the Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) of the people who have lived on that land for thousands of years.
        ENVS 312-401 OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE CLIMATE CHANGE MARINOV, IRINA M 0200PM-0500PM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. Large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology).
          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
          ENVS 399-401 ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES RESEARCH SEMINAR FOR JUNIORS ANDREWS, MARIA-ANTONIA T 0130PM-0430PM This seminar is designed to help Juniors prepare for the Senior Thesis research. Topic selection, advisor identification, funding options, and basic research methods will be discussed.
            ENVS 406-001 COMMUNITY BASED ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH HOWARTH, MARILYN TR 0130PM-0300PM From the fall of the Roman Empire to Love Canal to the epidemics of asthma, childhood obesity and lead poisoning in West Philadelphia, the impact of the environment on health has been a continuous challenge to society. The environment can affect people's health more strongly than biological factors, medical care and lifestyle. The water we drink, the food we eat, the air we breathe, and the neighborhood we live in are all components of the environment that impact our health. Some estimates, based on morbidity and mortality statistics, indicate that the impact of the environment on health is as high as 80%. These impacts are particularly significant in urban areas like West Philadelphia. Over the last 20 years, the field of environmental health has matured and expanded to become one of the most comprehensive and humanly relevant disciplines in science. This course will examine not only the toxicity of physical agents, but also the effects on human health of lifestyle, social and economic factors, and the built environment. Topics include cancer clusters, water borne diseases, radon and lung cancer, lead poisoning, environmental tobacco smoke, respiratory diseases and obesity. Students will research the health impacts of classic industrial pollution case studies in the US. Class discussions will also include risk communication, community outreach and education, access to health care and impact on vulnerable populations. Each student will have the opportunity to focus on Public Health, Environmental Protection, Public Policy, and Environmental Education issues as they discuss approaches to mitigating environmental health risks. This honors seminar will consist of lectures, guest speakers, readings, student presentations, discussions, research, and community service. The students will have two small research assignments including an Environmental and Health Policy Analysis and an Industrial Pollution Case Study Analysis. Both assignments will include class presentations. The major research assignment for the course will be a problem-oriented research paper and presentation on a topic related to community-based environmental health selected by the student. In this paper, the student must also devise practical recommendations for the problem based on their research.
              BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR; NURSING MINOR REQUIRED COURSE
              ENVS 407-001 PREVENTION OF TOBACCO ADDICTION IN PRE-ADOLESCENT CHILDREN OF PHILADELPHIA KULIK, MICHAEL TR 1030AM-1200PM Cigarette smoking is a major public health problem. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Control reports that more than 80% of current adult tobacco users started smoking before age 18. The National Youth Tobacco Survey indicated that 12.8% of middle school students and 34.8% of high school students in their study used some form of tobacco products. In ENVS 407, Penn undergraduates learn about the short and long term physiological consequences of smoking, social influences and peer norms regarding tobacco use, the effectiveness of cessation programs, tobacco advocacy and the impact of the tobacco settlement. Penn students will collaborate with teachers in West Philadelphia to prepare and deliver lessons to middle school students. The undergraduates will survey and evaluate middle school and Penn student smoking. One of the course goals is to raise awareness of the middle school children to prevent addiction to tobacco smoke during adolescence. Collaboration with the middle schools gives Penn students the opportunity to apply their study of the prevention of tobacco smoking to real world situations.
                AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE CURRICULUM http://www.sas.upenn.edu/earth/Envs407syll.pdf
                ENVS 410-301 THE ROLE OF WATER IN URBAN SUSTAINABILITY AND RESILIENCY NEUKRUG, HOWARD T 0530PM-0830PM This course will provide an overview of the cross-disciplinary fields of civil engineering, environmental sciences, urban hydrology, landscape architecture, green building, public outreach and politics. Students will be expected to conduct field investigations, review scientific data and create indicator reports, working with stakeholders and presenting the results at an annual symposium. There is no metaphor like water itself to describe the cumulative effects of our practices, with every upstream action having an impact downstream. In our urban environment, too often we find degraded streams filled with trash, silt, weeds and dilapidated structures. The water may look clean, but is it? We blame others, but the condition of the creeks is directly related to how we manage our water resources and our land. In cities, these resources are often our homes, our streets and our communities. This course will define the current issues of the urban ecosystem and how we move toward managing this system in a sustainable manner. We will gain an understanding of the dynamic, reciprocal relationship between practices in an watershed and its waterfront. Topics discussed include: drinking water quality and protection, green infrastructure, urban impacts of climate change, watershed monitoring, public education, creating strategies and more.
                  AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                  ENVS 416-401 FRESHWATER ECOLOGY ARSCOTT, DAVID MW 0330PM-0500PM Survey of the physical, chemical and biological properties of freshwater ecosystems, both riverine and lentic, natural and polluted.
                    ENVS 417-001 ANTHROPOCENE PLANTE, ALAIN R 0130PM-0430PM How much have humans altered the planet they live omn? Beyond climate change, humans have altered the Earth's land, oceans and biosphere to such an extent that the concept of a new geologic epoch defined by th eaction of humans is seriously debated.This seminar will examine th eorigins of the Anthropocene, the ways in which humans have altered Earth systems, whether or not these altera-tions warrant a new geologic designation, and what the future potentially holds for both humans and the planet.
                      BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                      ENVS 421-401 ELEMENTARY SCI METHODS BERGEY, NANCYLEE R 0500PM-0800PM A intensive approach to current methods, curricula, and trends in teaching science as basic learning, K-8. "hands-on" activities based on cogent, current philosophical and psychological theories including: S/T/S and gender issues. Focus on skill development in critical thinking. Content areas: living things, the physical universe, amd interacting ecosystems.
                        AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE
                        ENVS 498-001 SENIOR THESIS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE W 1200PM-0100PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                          SEE DEPT. FOR SECTION NUMBERS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                          ENVS 498-145 SENIOR THESIS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                            ENVS 498-146 SENIOR THESIS: RURAL ELECTRIFICATION IN SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA: A CASE STUDY OF KENYA DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                              ENVS 498-147 SENIOR THESIS: CHANGES IN PHILADELPHIA'S URBAN TREE CANOPY COVER DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                ENVS 498-148 SENIOR THESIS: ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH IMPACTS OF POOR ACCESS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                  ENVS 498-149 SENIOR THESIS: FOOD CONNECT: A LIFE CYCLE ANALYSIS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                    ENVS 498-150 SENIOR THESIS: ASSESSING SUSTAINABLE PROCUREMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                      PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                      ENVS 498-151 SENIOR THESIS: FEEDING ECOLOGY OF PTEROIS VOLITANS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                        ENVS 498-152 SENIOR THESIS: SENSITIVITY & PERCEPTION OF FOOD: COMPARATIVE RESEARCH OF TWO SUBURBS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                          ENVS 498-153 SENIOR THESIS: DETERMINING WHICH AIR POLLUTANT IS LIKELIEST TO CAUSE ASTHMA DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                            PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                            ENVS 498-154 SENIOR THESIS: EXTERNALITIES OF THE PHILADELPHIA ENERGY HUB TRANSITION:A GIS APPROACH DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                              ENVS 498-155 SENIOR THESIS: AN ENVIRONMENTAL PERSPECTIVE: ASTHMA MANAGEMENT AMONG PHILADELPHIA ATHLETES DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                ENVS 498-156 SENIOR THESIS: EVALUATING PHILADELPHIA'S 2012 LEAD PAINT AND CERTIFICATION LAW DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                  ENVS 498-157 SENIOR THESIS: BUILDING SUSTAINABLE SUPPLY CHAINS: OPPS.& CHALLENGES FOR YOUNG DESIGNERS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                    PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                    ENVS 601-660 Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies BORDEAUX, YVETTE T 0530PM-0810PM A detailed, comprehensive investigation of selected environmental problems. This is the first course taken by students entering the Master of Environmental Studies Program.
                                                      ENVS 606-660 Studying ornithological principles & behaviors to indicate ecosystem health MCGRAW, MICHAEL M 0530PM-0810PM This class will explore the foundations of avifaunal biology and ecology using a combination of hands-on classroom and in-the-field experiences. Classroom content includes physiology, anatomy, and morphology of birds. The fall migration of birds in North America is an epic and often tragic event. Sampling birds in migration has resulted in foundational understandings about stopover habitats, species-specific energy budgets and has helped realize the complete life cycle of hundreds of species. We will enter the field and participate in actual ornithological research, explore avifaunal ecology through birdwatching, and meet with regional leaders in the ornithological field.
                                                        ENVS 607-660 PUERTO RICO'S ECOLOGY WILLIG, SARAH CANCELED Puerto Rico has a varied climate, geology, and topography that combine with with periodic disturbance from hurricanes, landslides, and floods to produce a rich diversity of ecological systems (see Miller and Lugo, 2009). Extraction of the island's natural resources, agricultural production, and industrial, commercial, and residential development have greatly reduced the area of intact systems and put pressure on surviving remnants. Fortunately, there are protected natural areas (see map by Gould et al., 2011) that provide the opportunity to observe ecological patterns and processes of the tropics. We will spend a week exploring the island to capture its varied climate and bedrock represented in the wet forests of El Yunque on igneous rock, dry forests of Guanica on limestone, and dry to moist forests of Susua on serpentinite and Guajataca on limestone. We will also investigate the coastal systems of the Northeast Ecological Corridor, Guanica, and Cabo Rojo including coral reef, seagrass bed, beach, mangrove, rocky headland, and bioluminescent bay. The course will include regular Wednesday night classes leading up to the spring break trip during which we will review the literature and learn about the ecological systems of the island, including Penn research in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (see Harris et al., 2012), and view Taino artifacts from from the Penn Museum collection. Students will research a specific system or location that we will visit and present information on the interaction of abiotic and biotic factors to the class before we leave. Upon our return, students will complete a research project on a topic of interest related to the field trip and present findings and analysis in a class presentation and paper.
                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                          ENVS 616-660 Risk Assessment: Science & Policy Challenges PEPINO, RICHARD R 0530PM-0810PM How do government policy-makers make decisions about potential threats to human health and the environment in the face of scientific uncertainty? The course develops the concept of Risk Assessment from the publication of the 1983 National Research Council (NRC) report commonly known as the "Red Book" which was used to rank the initial hazardous waste sites under the Superfund program. Using a variety of teaching tools, including lectures, panel discussions, and case studies, the course examines how public policy decisions regarding environmental risk are made and how effective those decisions are at reducing risks to affected populations. The course focuses on the complex interaction of science, economics, politics, laws, and regulations in dealing with environmental and public health risks. The course will begin with a review of the policy process and methods used in evaluating human health and environmental risks, including the traditional steps in the risk assessment process, including quantitative and qualitative aspects of hazard identification, dose-response assessment, exposure assessment, and risk characterization. The course will then focus on how scientific uncertainty, risk perceptions, socio-economic disparities, risk communication, and politics influence environmental risk-based decision-making. Issues such as special populations (e.g., children, elderly, immune-compromised, woman of pregnancy age, etc.) must be considered when developing risk reduction strategies. The use of the "precautionary principle" will be discussed in the context of different types of environmental stressors (e.g., pesticides, chemicals, climate change, air pollution, water quality, and land use) and how this important controversial principle is applied differently in contrasting national and European risk management policies.
                                                            ENVS 620-660 DEVELOPING ENV POLICY KULIK, MICHAEL T 0530PM-0810PM When we think of environmental policies in the USA, we may think of one or more laws geared to improve our nation's air, water, ecosystems, and biodiversity. However, environmental policies and policy-making comprise more than just specific laws and regulations. Making and implementing environmental policy is a process influenced by multiple political, cultural, and economic factors in addition to scientific factors, all of which impact the ability of policies to be effective, that is, to actually improve the environment. In this course, we develop a framework to analyze the effectiveness of the social actors, process and outcomes of environmental policy-making. We ask questions such as: How do policy makers define environmental problems and solutions? Who are the social actors involved in the process? How are policies created and negotiated? What underlying assumptions and realities about the roles of government and society shape policy instruments and design? Are science and risk accurate or distorted? How are social and environmental justice intertwined? To answer these complex questions, we contextualize and critically analyze policies to determine how both government and society impact on regulatory approaches. We study the institutions involved and examine social and ecological outcomes of environmental policies. We also discuss contemporary issues and policy situations that arise throughout the course of the semester, and comment on them in a class blog. Finally, students will select an environmental issue and formulate a policy proposal to recommend to decisionmakers.
                                                              ENVS 640-401 OCEAN-ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR FUTURE CLIMATE CHANGE MARINOV, IRINA M 0200PM-0500PM This course covers the fundamentals of atmosphere and ocean dynamics, and aims to put these in the context of climate change in the 21st century. large-scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation, the global energy balance, and the global energy balance, and the global hydrological cycle. We will introduce concepts of fluid dynamics and we will apply these to the vertical and horizontal motions in the atmosphere and ocean. Concepts covered include: hydrostatic law, buoyancy and convection, basic equations of fluid motions, Hadley and Ferrel cells in the atmosphere, thermohaline circulation, Sverdrup ocean flow, modes of climate variability (El-Nino, North Atlantic Oscillation, Southern Annular Mode). The course will incorporate student led discussions based on readings of the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report and recent literature on climate change. Aimed at undergraduate or graduate students who have no prior knowledge of meteorology or oceanography or training in fluid mechanics. Previous background in calculus and/or introductory physics is helpful. This is a general course which spans many subdisciplines (fluid mechanics, atmospheric science, oceanography, hydrology).
                                                                SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                                                ENVS 644-660 ENERGY, WASTE & ENV GIERE, RETO W 0530PM-0810PM The aim of this course is to provide an incentive to use geochemical and mineralogical principles to address and solve major environmental problems. The students identify the problems that are associated with different types of waste. This course covers a wide range of problems associated with the waste arising from the generation of electricity. The main topics will be the uranium cycle, characterization of nuclear waste, and the containment and disposal of nuclear waste. Based on insights from the nuclear fuel cycle, solutions are presented that diminish the environmental impacts of coal and biomass combustion products, incineration of municipal solid waste, toxic waste due to refuse incineration, and landfills and landfill gases.
                                                                  ENVS 665-660 INDUSTRIAL ECOLOGY HAGAN, JAMES R 0530PM-0810PM Industrial Ecology is the multidisciplinary study of industrial systems and economic activities and their links to natural systems. The word "industrial" represents how humans use natural resources in the production of goods and services. "Ecology" refers to the concept that our industrial systems need to operate within sustainable natural ecosystems. The application of industrial ecology requires a movement of industrial processes from open loop business processes, where resource and capital investments move through the system to create products and waste, to a closed loop system where wastes (aka by-products) become inputs for new processes. This approach will allow to move to a circular economy. The implementation of industrial ecology, which aligns business operations with the natural cycle, creates the opportunity for a circular economy and has the potential for significant benefit for industry as well as for the long term viability of the human population and the natural ecosystem.
                                                                    ENVS 669-660 Corporate Sustainability Strategies SURVIS, GARY M 0530PM-0810PM Before the year 2000, "environmental management" for a business was typically driven by the need to respond to restrictions imposed by environmental regulation. But, at the dawn of the new millennium, leading businesses began to change their concept of environmental management to look beyond simply meeting governmental dictates. These organizations began to evolve and utilize "environmental strategy" to create new ways of growing their businesses by bringing sustainability to the core of their business strategies. This seismic shift in view was accompanied by a bottom line emphasis that, in some cases, turned sustainability efforts into profit centers. Sustainability increasingly is not hidden within the silo of environmental, health, and safety departments but has become much more seamlessly integrated into the operations of corporate functional disciplines. Today, to effectively work in senior management, an executive needs to be knowledgeable not only about his or her specific business function but also how his or her business will be impacted by governmental regulations, policies, corporate sustainability initiatives, green marketing regulations, industry guidelines or 'best practices', new sustainable technologies, energy planning, environmental performance metrics, and required reporting on the environmental impact of their business unit.
                                                                      ENVS 674-660 LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT HAGAN, JAMES
                                                                      ENGLISH, NANCY
                                                                      T 0530PM-0810PM In order to make sensible decisions on products or projects, people need to understand the environmental impacts of these actions. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a process to assess environmental impacts throughout the different stages of a product or project's life. This seminar is intended to be comprehensive and covers material extraction, processing, manufacture, distribution, use and end of life reuse, recovery or disposal. The objective of conducting an LCA is to compare the full range of environmental impacts that emanate from the provision of these products or services and then use that information to improve the situation to minimize or eliminate harm. The focus of this class will be to understand the phases of an LCA as well as conduct LCAs that compare the impacts of two related options. This course will enable the student to conduct LCAs and examine the use of software that could be used in this regard.The classic examples are cloth vs. disposable diapers, paper vs. ceramic cups, and so on. This course will enable the student to conduct LCAs and examine the use of software that could be used in this regard.
                                                                        ENVS 681-660 MODELING GEOGRAPH SPACE TOMLIN, CHARLES W 0530PM-0810PM This course explores the nature and use of raster-based geographic information systems (GIS) for the analysis and synthesis of spatial patterns and processes through 'cartographic modeling'. Cartographic modeling is a general but well defined methodology that can be used to address a wide variety of analytical mapping applications in a clear and consistent manner. It does so by decomposing both data and data-processing tasks into elemental components that can then be recomposed with relative ease and with great flexibility.
                                                                          ENVS 684-660 Ecology, Management, and Advocacy of Urban Forests WILLIG, SARAH W 0530PM-0810PM Urban forests provide ecological and socio-economic benefits ranging from improving air, water, and soil quality to creating wildlife habitat to enhancing thermal comfort and the health of individuals and whole communities to increasing property values and more. We will explore research on the nature, function, and value of urban forests. We will investigate reforestation efforts in Philadelphia, Baltimore, New York, and Pittsburgh with projects typically involving deer control, invasive plant removal, planting of native trees and shrubs increasingly propagated from local seed sources, maintenance, and monitoring. We will learn about the myriad advocacy and education programs supporting urban forests. Speakers from the US Forest Service, Philadelphia Parks and Recreation, and TreePittsburgh will expand our understanding of these important ecosystems. Five weekend field trips to Fairmount Park in Philadelphia, Baltimore, and NYC will illustrate the character of urban forests and reforestation projects. Students will research and present on an urban forest system (from Philadelphia or elsewhere) and research a topic of interest related to course content.
                                                                            ENVS 699-660 MES CAPSTONE SEMINAR BORDEAUX, YVETTE R 0530PM-0810PM This course is designed to help students successfully complete their MES Capstone. A set of milestones will be set and regular meetings will be held in groups and individually to aid the student as they complete the research portion of their degree.We will be working together to complete a series of steps towards the final project. These steps fall into five major areas 1) Reviewing the literature; 2) Finding a model; 3) Framing your research; 4) managing data; and 5) Writing your results. Throughout the semester, we will also discuss career goals and the job search.
                                                                              GEOL 100-601 INTRO TO GEOLOGY OMAR, GOMAA W 0530PM-0830PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses.
                                                                                Physical World Sector (all classes) ONLY OPEN TO LPS STUDENTS; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                                                GEOL 125-001 EARTH THROUGH TIME PEREZ-RODRIGUEZ, ILEANA TR 1200PM-0130PM Origin of Earth, continents, and life. Continental movements, changing climates, and evolving life.
                                                                                  Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                                                  GEOL 130-001 OCEANOGRAPHY: Oceans & Climate DMOCHOWSKI, JANE TR 0130PM-0300PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment.
                                                                                    Physical World Sector (all classes) STRUCTURED,ACTIVE,IN-CLASS LEARNING; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                                                    GEOL 130-002 OCEANOGRAPHY DMOCHOWSKI, JANE TR 1200PM-0130PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment.
                                                                                      Physical World Sector (all classes) STRUCTURED,ACTIVE,IN-CLASS LEARNING; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                                                      GEOL 208-001 STRUCTURAL GEOLOGY PHIPPS, STEPHEN F 1200PM-0200PM
                                                                                      M 1200PM-0100PM
                                                                                      Introduction to deformation as a fundamental geologic process. Stress and strain; rock mechanics. Definition, measurement, geometrical and statistical analysis, and interpretation of structural features. Structural problems in the field. Maps, cross-sections, and three-dimensional visualization; regional structural geology.
                                                                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                        GEOL 208-101 LABORATORY PHIPPS, STEPHEN R 0130PM-0400PM Introduction to deformation as a fundamental geologic process. Stress and strain; rock mechanics. Definition, measurement, geometrical and statistical analysis, and interpretation of structural features. Structural problems in the field. Maps, cross-sections, and three-dimensional visualization; regional structural geology.
                                                                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                          GEOL 317-401 PETROL & PETROG OMAR, GOMAA MW 0100PM-0230PM Occurrences and origins of igneous and metamorphic rocks; phase equilibria in heterogeneous systems. Laboratory study of rocks and thin sections as a tool ininterpretation of petrogenesis.
                                                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                            GEOL 317-402 LABORATORY OMAR, GOMAA W 0230PM-0530PM Occurrences and origins of igneous and metamorphic rocks; phase equilibria in heterogeneous systems. Laboratory study of rocks and thin sections as a tool ininterpretation of petrogenesis.
                                                                                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                              GEOL 399-401 GEOLOGY RESEARCH SEMINAR ANDREWS, MARIA-ANTONIA T 0130PM-0430PM This seminar is designed to help Juniors prepare for the Senior Thesis research. Topic selection, advisor identification, funding options, and basic research methods will be discussed.
                                                                                                GEOL 403-001 METEOROLOGY AND EARTH'S CLIMATE SYSTEM OMAR, GOMAA TR 1030AM-1150AM This course deals with the study of the two main parts of Earth's climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean. It explores, qualitatively and quantitatively,the physical laws, geological and geographical processes, and mass and energy budgets that govern these two parts and their combined influence on Earth's past and present climate. Main topics covered include, but not limited to, properties of air and water; physical balances; equilibrium states; transport of heat and mass; clouds; precipitation; storms; regional and global climate; ozone layer; seasons and climate; weather forecasting; atmospheric optics; ocean currents; ocean bathymetry, salinity, and atmospheric forcing; history of Earth's changing climate in the geologic record, global warming, and how climate impacts humans and how do humans impact climate.
                                                                                                  SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                  GEOL 403-101 LABORATORY OMAR, GOMAA R 0130PM-0400PM This course deals with the study of the two main parts of Earth's climate system, the atmosphere and the ocean. It explores, qualitatively and quantitatively,the physical laws, geological and geographical processes, and mass and energy budgets that govern these two parts and their combined influence on Earth's past and present climate. Main topics covered include, but not limited to, properties of air and water; physical balances; equilibrium states; transport of heat and mass; clouds; precipitation; storms; regional and global climate; ozone layer; seasons and climate; weather forecasting; atmospheric optics; ocean currents; ocean bathymetry, salinity, and atmospheric forcing; history of Earth's changing climate in the geologic record, global warming, and how climate impacts humans and how do humans impact climate.
                                                                                                    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                    GEOL 417-401 ADVANCED PETROLOGY LAB OMAR, GOMAA MW 0100PM-0230PM Chemistry, physics, phase equilibria, microscope study in igneous and metamorphic petrology.
                                                                                                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                      GEOL 417-402 LABORATORY OMAR, GOMAA W 0230PM-0530PM Chemistry, physics, phase equilibria, microscope study in igneous and metamorphic petrology.
                                                                                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                                        GEOL 420-001 INTRO TO GEOPHYSICS GOLDSBY, DAVID TR 1200PM-0130PM This course will cover the application of geophysical investigation techniques to problems of the earth's plantary structure, local subsurface structure and mineral prospecting. The topics will include principles of geophysical measurements and interpretation with emphasis on gravity measurement, isostasy, geomagnitism, sesmic refraction and reflection,electrical prospecting, electromagnetics and groung radar.
                                                                                                          GEOL 498-001 SENIOR THESIS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE W 1200PM-0100PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                                                                            SEE DEPT. FOR SECTION NUMBERS; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                            GEOL 498-140 SENIOR THESIS: EXAMINING ICE-GRAPHITE MIXTURES THROUGH LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                                                                              PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                              GEOL 498-141 SENIOR THESIS: MODERN COMPARISONS OF THE MOON AND MERCURY USING SECONDARY CRATERS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                                                                                PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                GEOL 498-142 SENIOR THESIS: DESCRIPTION OF A LEPTOCERATOPS SPECIMEN FROM THE LANCE FORMATION OF WYOMING DMOCHOWSKI, JANE The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                                                  GEOL 515-001 EVOL OF LAND ECOSYSTEMS SALLAN, LAUREN CANCELED Origin and diversification of land ecosystems. Interaction between plants and animals. Effects of past climatic change and other external factors. The importance of past changes in land ecosystems to our understanding of current global change.
                                                                                                                    GEOL 516-001 PALEOECOLOGY: DISCOVERING LOST ECOSYSTEMS SALLAN, LAUREN TR 1030AM-1200PM Paleoecology, or ecology in the fossil record,is the study of how interactions between species have developed over time and how ecosystems and environmental change have shaped the evolution of life and biodiversity.It also involves rebuilding lost communities from fossil evidence to provide context for the origins of modern life and modern ecosystems.This seminar course will survey major topics in Paleoecology, including of ecosystems,the long-term connections between habitat, life mode and biodiversity as well as the distribution of life (e.g. paleobiogeography), escalation between predatorsand prey, competition between invasive and resident species, and how we can infer the ecology and behavior of long-dead organisms. Students will lead discussions on select concepts and choose one topic to investigate in depth.
                                                                                                                      GEOL 618-690 Fundamentals of Air Pollution ANDREWS, MARIA-ANTONIA M 0530PM-0810PM This course will cover various topics related to Air Quality. Initial lectures will cover the history of air pollution, discussions of the Clean Air Act and composition of the atmosphere. We will then progress to discussion of atmospheric pollutants and sources of those pollutants. Additional topics will include: fate of atmospheric pollutants (transport and dispersion mechanis will include: fate of atmospheric pollutants (transport and mechanisms), effects of air pollution (health and environmental effects), urban smog, acid rain, climate change, ozone depletion in the stratosphere, air quality criteria, and engineering controls.
                                                                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                                        GEOL 619-001 INSTRUM FOR THE GEOSCIEN VANN, DAVID MW 0330PM-0500PM An introduction to the theory, operation and application of modern analytical instrumentation used in geo- and environmental sciences. Primarily focused on laboratory instrumentation such as mass spectroscopy, elemental analyses and x-ray techniques. Some field instruments will be introduced as well. Students will be expected to develop projects utilizing the various instruments.
                                                                                                                          GEOL 650-690 Environmental Due Diligence CRON, MITCH R 0530PM-0810PM Evaluation of environmental contamination and liability is an important tool during acquisition of real estate property, and a standard work product in the environmental consulting field. This course will cover the purpose and history of the Superfund law, the various classifications of Superfund liable parties, and protections against Superfund liability, specifically with regard to bona fide prospective purchasers (BFPP). In the context of the BFPP liability defense the course will focus on the performance of "All Appropriate Inquiry" for the presence of environmental contamination (e.g. Phase I environmental site assessment). Our study of "All Appropriate Inquiry" will include evaluation of historical maps and other resources, aerial photography, chain-of-title documentation, and governmental database information pertaining to known contaminated sites in the area of select properties on or near campus. Site visits will be performed to gain experience and knowledge for the identification of recognized environmental conditions. Students will prepare environmental reports for select properties and will have an opportunity to hone technical writing skills.
                                                                                                                            GEOL 658-690 ENVRNMNTL STAT ANAYLSIS MASTROPAOLO, CARL M 0600PM-0900PM Statistical analysis of data from geological, geotechnical, and geohydrologic sources.
                                                                                                                              GEOL 661-690 Environmental Groundwater Hydrology MASTROPAOLO, CARL T 0600PM-0900PM This course is designed to introduce the major definitions and concepts regarding groundwater flow and contaminant transport. The theory and underlying concepts, including mathematical derivations of governing equations used to model groundwater flow and contaminant transport, will be discussed and applications to environmental problems addressed. Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have acquired the skills necessary to pursue course work in flow and transport numerical and analytical modeling.
                                                                                                                                GEOL 668-690 GEOMECHANICS: FLUIDS DUDA, GEORGE T 0600PM-0900PM Static and Dynamic mechanical properties of fluid in earth materials, as applied to the Hydrologic Sciences; Principles of Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics applied to open channel flow in earth materials; flow through gates, weirs, spillways, and culverts; Applications of Darcy's Law to subsurface flow and seepage.
                                                                                                                                  GEOL 680-690 SITE CHARACTERIZATION: Interpretation of Near-surface Geologic Structure for Engrng & Envrnmnt FREED, CHAD W 0600PM-0900PM The course introduces the basic principles of structural geology and their applications to engineering and environmental site characterization. Includes the mechanisms for the deformation and failure of the earth's crust, folded and faulted structures, and the orthogonal and stereographic solutions to characterize near-surface geologic structure. It also includes the construction and interpretation of geologic maps, geologic cross sections and block diagrams. Emphasis is placed on the graphical representation of subsurface data, including the use of selected computer programs, and the integration of the data to solve problems encountered in engineering and environmental projects.
                                                                                                                                    GEOL 699-690 PROJECT DESIGN SEMINAR BORDEAUX, YVETTE R 0530PM-0810PM This course is designed to prepare Master of Science in Applied Geosciences students to undertake their Project Design exercise. In this course, we discuss how to identify an appropriate research project, how to design a research plan, and how to prepare a detailed proposal. By the end of the course, each student is expected to have completed a Project Design proposal.
                                                                                                                                      GEOL 750-301 TOPICS IN EARTH SCIENCE SALLAN, LAUREN F 0300PM-0400PM
                                                                                                                                      T 0600PM-0800PM
                                                                                                                                      This course will use the weekly EES seminar series to survey historic breakthrogh papers or topics in the earth sciences, as well as modern papers - written by the seminar speakers - that often put the classics in perspective. Graduate students (Ph.D. only) in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science will engage in the material through reading, presentation, and discussion. The course has several goals. (1.) To engender an understanding and appreciation of major breakthroughs in our field. (2.) To develop skills in presenting and discussing scientific results. And (3.) to refine students' understanding of what constitutes great science.

                                                                                                                                        Department of Earth and Environmental Science / University of Pennsylvania, 251 Hayden Hall, 240 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316