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Courses for Fall 2018

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Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
ENVS 152-401 LIQUID HISTORIES AND FLOATING ARCHIVES WIGGIN, BETHANY TR 1030AM-1200PM
    ENVS 211-401 RELIGION & ECOLOGY COVEY, ALLISON MW 0200PM-0330PM
      ENVS 301-001 ENVIR CASE STDS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE MW 0200PM-0330PM A detailed, comprehensive investigation of selected environmental problems. Guest speakers from the government and industry will give their acccounts of various environmental cases. Students will then present information on a case study of their choosing.
        ENVS 305-401 BIOREMEDIATION VANN, DAVID M 0500PM-0800PM This course is an introduction to current and developing techniques for analyzing environmental contamination and for remediation of damaged environments. Knowledge of these options is important for students interested in public/law applications and environmental lanscape design and as a starting point for those pursuing a more science-oriented understanding. The first portion of this course will address bioindicators, the use of living systems to assess environmental contamination. These include systems ranging from biochemical assays to monitoring of whole organisms or ecosystems, as well as techniques ranging from laboratory to field and satellite surveys. The second portion of the course will introduce technologies for bioremediation- the use of living systems to restore contaminated environments. The technologies scale from single-species systems to complex ecosystems such as constructed wetlands; case studies will be examined. Students will be expected to participate in field trips, as well as prepare a final paper examining a particular technology in detail.
          ENVS 325-001 SUSTAINABLE GOODS HAGAN, JAMES TR 0130PM-0300PM The study of sustainability-the long term viability of humans in harmony with the environment-has been identified as a critical issue for society and industry and is evolving to examine how society should conduct itself in order to survive.This issue impacts the consumer goods that we use in our lives,the processes that are designed to make these goods, and the raw materials that we obtain to create these goods.The questions that we will examine will be:can these goods be obtained,made,and consumed in a fashion that allows the current quality of life to be mantained (or enhanced) for future generations? Can these processes be sustainable? A review of consumer goods is necessary as the starting point in order to understand the basic needs of people in society and why people consume goods as they do. Subsequently,each student will choose a product to examine in detail and will research the product for its impact with respect to natural resource selection,production,use,and disposal/reuse.
            ENVS 326-001 GIS MAP PLAC & ANALY SPA: GIS MAPPING PLACES & ANALYZING SPACES HEINLEN, KRISTA T 0430PM-0730PM This course is a hands-on introduction to the concepts and capabilities of geographic information systems (GIS). Students will develop the skills necessary for carrying out basic GIS projects and for advanced GIS coursework. The class will focus on a broad range of functional and practical applications,ranging from environmental science and planning to land use history, social demography, and public health. By the end of the course, students will be ableto find, organize, map, and analyze data using both vector (i.e. drawing-based) and raster (i.e. image-based) GIS tools, while developing an appreciation for basic cartographic principles relating to map presentation.This course fulfillsthe spatial analysis requirement for ENVS and EASC Majors. Previous experiencein the use of GIS is not required.
              MAJORS ONLY
              ENVS 400-302 ENVS SEMINAR: LANDSCAPE SUSTAINABILITY JEROLMACK, DOUGLAS TR 1200PM-0130PM Application of student and faculty expertise to a specific environmental problem, chosen expressly for the seminar.
                ENVS 400-305 ENVS SEMINAR: ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY KULIK, MICHAEL TR 1030AM-1200PM Application of student and faculty expertise to a specific environmental problem, chosen expressly for the seminar.
                  ENVS 404-301 URBAN ENVIRONMENTS:SPEAKING ABOUT LEAD IN WEST PHILADELPHIA PEPINO, RICHARD TR 1030AM-1200PM Lead poisoning can cause learning disabilities, impaired hearing, behavioral problems, and at very high levels, seizures, coma and even death. Children up to the age of six are especially at risk because of their developing systems; they often ingest lead chips and dust while playing in their home and yards. In ENVS 404, Penn undergraduates learn about the epidemiology of lead poisoning, the pathways of exposure, and methods for community outreach and education. Penn students collaborate with middle school and high school teachers in West Philadelphia to engage middle school children in exercises that apply environmental research relating to lead poisoning to their homes and neighborhoods.
                    Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE CURRICULUM; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR; NURSING MINOR REQUIRED COURSE
                    ENVS 408-301 URBAN ASTHMA EPIDEMIC KULIK, MICHAEL TR 0130PM-0300PM Asthma as a pediatric chronic disease is undergoing a dramatic and unexplained increase. It has become the number one cause of public school absenteeism and now accounts for a significant number of childhood deaths each year in the USA.The Surgeon General of the United States has characterized childhood asthma as an epidemic. In ENVS 408, Penn undergraduates learn about the epidemiology of urban asthma, the debate about the probable causes of the current asthma crisis, and the nature and distribution of environmental factors that modern medicine describes as potential triggers of asthma episodes. Penn students will co-teach asthma classes offered in public schools in West Philadelphia and survey asthma caregivers,providing them with the opportunity to apply theoretical knowledge to real-world situations,promotecommunity education and awareness about asthma, and use problem-solving learning to enhance student education in environmental health.
                      AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; COMMUNICATION WITHIN THE CURRICULUM http://www.sas.upenn.edu/earth/Envs408syll.pdf
                      ENVS 411-301 AIR POLLUTION: SOURCES & EFFECTS IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS ANDREWS, MARIA-ANTONIA
                      HOWARTH, MARILYN
                      TR 0300PM-0430PM This is an ABCS course designed to provide the student with an understanding of air pollution at the local, regional and global levels. The nature, composition, and properties of air pollutants in the atmosphere will also be studied. The course will focus on Philadelphia's air quality and how air pollutants have an adverse effect on the health of the residents. The recent designation by IARC of Air Pollution as a known carcinogen will be explored. How the community is exposed to air pollutants with consideration of vulnerable populations will be considered. Through a partnership with Philadelphia Air Management Service (AMS) agency the science of air monitoring and trends over time will be explored. Philadelphia's current non-attainment status for PM2.5. and ozone will be studied. Philadelphia's current initiatives to improvethe air quality of the city will be discussed. Students will learn to measure PM2.5 in outdoor and indoor settings and develop community-based outreach tools to effectively inform the community of Philadelphia regarding air pollution. The outreach tools developed by students may be presentations, written materials, apps, websites or other strategies for enhancing environmental health literacy of the community. A project based approach will be used to include student monitoring of area schools, school bus routes, and the community at large. The data collected will be presented to students in the partner elementary school in West Philadelphia . Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have attained a broad understanding of and familiarity with the sources, fate, and the environmental impacts and health effects of air pollutants.
                        Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR; NURSING MINOR REQUIRED COURSE
                        ENVS 494-660 Sustainable Initiatives in Higher Education GAROFALO, DANIEL M 0530PM-0810PM In 2007, Penn became one of the first universities in the country to commit to creating a more sustainable campus. President Amy Gutmann's press release on February 7, 2005 announced that Penn would develop a comprehensive sustainability plan by 2009. In President Gutmann's speech, she stated that Penn's sustainability plan would, "Include completing a comprehensive inventory of all its greenhouse gas emissions; purchasing at least 15 percent of its electricity from renewable sources; adopting an energy efficient appliance purchasing program; committing to a policy that new construction be built to the US Green Building Council LEED Silver standards, or equivalent; and providing access to public transit for faculty, students, and staff." How has Penn's "environmental footprint" changed? The students will build on the work of others, document existing efforts at Penn, and benchmark against other universities. The course will explore the issues mentioned above and and will also address issues such as storm-water management, the greening of campus, and leadership in the nearby community. The students will establish baseline data and measurement strategies so that success can be measured, and then will develop strategies to collect and analyze additional data. Included in the course will be the concepts of environmental management systems, secondary impacts (e.g., commuting habits of Penn employees), pollution prevention, and life-cycle analysis. Each student or group of students, will select an area of focus for their research exercise (e.g., energy, recycling, green buildings) and develop a report that can be used by the Penn administration to advance Penn's efforts toward sustainability. The students a cumulative class report summarizing their ideas for improvement. This report will be delivered the President's Office.
                          ENVS 498-001 SENIOR THESIS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE M 1100AM-1200PM The culmination of the Environmental Studies major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                            ENVS 507-660 WETLANDS WILLIG, SARAH W 0530PM-0810PM The course focuses on the natural history of different wetland types including climate, geology, and,hydrology factors that influence wetland development Associated soil, vegetation, and wildlife characteristics and key ecological processes will be covered as well. Lectures will be supplemented with weekend wetland types, ranging from tidal salt marshes to non-tidal marshes, swamps, and glacial bogs in order to provide field experience in wetland identification, characterization, and functional assessment. Outside speakers will discuss issues in wetland seed bank ecology, federal regulation, and mitigation. Students will present a short paper on the ecology of a wetland animal and a longer term paper on a selected wetland topic. Readings from the text, assorted journal papers, government technical documents, and book excerpts will provide a broad overview of the multifaceted field of wetland study.
                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                              ENVS 541-660 Modeling Geographic Objects TOMLIN, CHARLES T 0530PM-0810PM This course offers a broad and practical introduction to the acquisition, storage, retrieval, maintenance, use, and presentation of digital cartographic data with both image and drawing based geographic information systems (GIS) for a variety of environmental science, planning, and management applications. Its major objectives are to provide the training necessary to make productive use of at least two well known software packages, and to establish the conceptual foundation on which to build further skills and knowledge in late practice.
                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                ENVS 601-660 Proseminar: Contemporary Issues in Environmental Studies BORDEAUX, YVETTE T 0530PM-0810PM A detailed, comprehensive investigation of selected environmental problems. This is the first course taken by students entering the Master of Environmental Studies Program.
                                  ENVS 605-401 BIOREMEDIATION VANN, DAVID M 0500PM-0800PM This course is an introduction to current and developing techniques for analyzing environmental contamination and for remediation of damaged environments. Knowledge of these options is important for students interested in public/law applications and environmental/landscape design and as a starting point for those pursuing a more science-oriented understanding. The first portion of this course will address bioindicators-the use of living systems to assess environmental contamination. These include systems ranging from biochemical assays to monitoring of whole organisms or ecosystems, as wellas techniques ranging from laboratory to field and satellite surveys. The second portion of the course will introduce technologies for bioremediation- the use of living systems to restore contaminated environments. The technologies scale from single-species systems to complex ecosystems such as constructed wetlands; case studies will be examined. Students will be expected to participate in field trips, as well as prepare a final paper examining a particular technology in detail.
                                    ENVS 609-660 Creating Gateways to the Land with Smarter Conservation KIZIUK, LISA T 0530PM-0810PM Conservationists were long accused of ignoring the needs of human communities. often been thought of as protecting land from people. Now, the conservation movement is embracing a different viewprotecting land with and for people. As a result innovative programs have been developed that connect people to nature, thereby helping to facilitate land conservation. This interdisciplinary course will integrate concepts in scientific method, study design, ecology, and conservation with a focus on birds in order to foster an understanding of how research can inform management of wildlife populations and communities. Topics will include wildlife management, habitat restoration, geographical information systems (GIS), sustainable agriculture, integrated land-use management, and vegetation analysis. This course will also provide opportunities for field research and application of techniques learned in the classroom.
                                      ENVS 629-660 US WATER INDUSTRY NEUKRUG, HOWARD W 0530PM-0810PM The course will explore all 4 sectors of the water business in the United States: The Drinking Water Industry, The Stormwater Utility, Water Resources (rivers, streams, reservoirs) Management and the Water Pollution Control Industry. The course will have 2 primary foci: 1. The influences on the industry from new technologies and infrastructure, acceptable levels of risk, public and private sector competition, climate change, the bottled water industry, resource recovery, rates and affordability and other influences will be investigated. 2. The management of a 21st century utility will be explored, including topics of organization and leadership, the role of environmentalism, infrastructure financing, water / wastewater treatment facility operations, public affairs and media, and designing a capital improvement program are examples of topic areas.
                                        ENVS 648-660 FOOD & AGRICLTRL POLICY KULIK, MICHAEL R 0530PM-0810PM Food is central to our daily lives, yet we seldom think about the political or social implications of what we eat. In this course, students will study how societies produce, distribute, market and consume food, with an emphasis on American politics and food systems to develop an understanding of how policies policies are shaped by power relations, institutions, and ideas. Topics include food systems, food and agriculture industries, farming practices, sustainable agriculture, food security, genetically modified foods, hunger, obesity, nutrition policy, food labeling and marketing, fast food, junk food, and more.
                                          ENVS 667-660 INTRO TO SUSTAINABILITY HAGAN, JAMES R 0530PM-0810PM The study of sustainability-the long term viability of humans in harmony with the environment-has been identified as a critical issue for society and industry and is evolving to examine how society should conduct itself in order to survive.There are a number of aspects to how society organizes its activities that will be reviewed. Issues such as sustainable products, sustainable agriculture, sustainable forestry, sustainable fisheries, and sustainable communities, to name just a few, are areas that are the focus of the need for change. This course will review the various aspects of sustainability in society and ask each student to conduct a qualitative comparison of the life cycle impacts of two products that provide the same function to determine which is more sustainable and if and how they could both be made sustainable for the long term.
                                            ENVS 673-660 THE FUTURE OF WATER FREEDMAN, JON
                                            MCCANN, FRANCESCA
                                            M 0530PM-0810PM From Wall Street to rural Sub-Saharan Africa, technology innovation to aging infrastructure-this course will explore the; impact of water and consider what future leaders need to know about the dynamics of the industry, investment and business opportunities, and water-related risk; Opportunities for water are booming around the world, in large part because of existing or looming shortages and decades of underinvestment, population growth, rapid industrialization and urbanization, pollution, and climate change. Water is the only irreplaceable natural resource on the planet. Its critical role in every aspect of the global economy, could, in fact, lead it to be the next gold or the next oil; This course will address the fundamentals of the water sector from an international perspective. The future of water will be critical to our global economic, social and political development and will likely become one of the most influential factors in business decisions for the future. Furthermore, it is essential for leaders across all sectors-from pharmaceuticals to financials, energy to agriculture-to understand how to sustainably manage and account for water resources, capitalize on new technologies, mitigate water-related risks and navigate through complex and dynamic policy and regulation. The course will engage students in high-level discussion and strategy formation, challenging them to develop creative and sustainable solutions to some of the greatest challenges facing environmental, business and water industry leaders today. Interactive sessions and projects will provide an introduction to appropriately managing, valuing and investing in water assets to create sustainable and compelling business opportunities.
                                              ENVS 676-660 CORP SUSTAIN MGMT & COMM HAGAN, JAMES
                                              ENGLISH, NANCY
                                              CANCELED Sustainability (i.e. the long term viability of humans in harmony with the environment) has been identified as a critical issue for society and industry. The question is what actions individual companies can take to promote sustainability. This course will focus on the approach to both managing and communicating the corporate sustainability function. The opportunity that exists is to demonstrate that sustainability can reduce costs and enhance the corporations reputation. A sustainable approach looks to change core business activities that consume resources and generate waste (now to be seen as by-products) so that the new business model will not only have a beneficial impact on the environment but also generate better products, reduce costs and improve trust between society and the company. The implementation of sustainability management systems, which assists in aligning business operations with sustainable principles, has the potential for significant benefit for industry as well as for the long term viability of the human population and the natural ecosystem. The key will be to communicate the approach and the benefit so that investors, employees and the public understand what is at stake.
                                                GEOL 100-001 INTRO TO GEOLOGY OMAR, GOMAA MWF 1100AM-1200PM An introduction to processes and forces that form the surface and the interior of the Earth. Topics include, changes in climate, the history of life, as well as earth resources and their uses.
                                                  Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                  GEOL 103-001 NAT DISTURB & DISASTERS CRON, MITCH MW 0330PM-0500PM Natural disturbances play a fundamental role in sculpturing landscapes and structuring natural and human-based ecosystems. This course explores the natural and social science of disturbances by analyzing their geologic causes, their ecological and social consequences, and the role of human behavior in disaster reduction and mitigation. Volcanoes, earthquakes, floods, droughts, fires, and extraterrestrial impacts are analyzed and compared.
                                                    Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                    GEOL 109-001 Introduction to Geotechnical Science OMAR, GOMAA MWF 1100AM-1200PM Open to architectural and engineering majors as well as Ben Franklin Scholars. Field trips. Relations of rocks, rock structures, soils, ground water, and geologic agents to architectural, engineering, and land-use problems.
                                                      Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                      GEOL 109-101 LABORATORY OMAR, GOMAA M 0230PM-0530PM Open to architectural and engineering majors as well as Ben Franklin Scholars. Field trips. Relations of rocks, rock structures, soils, ground water, and geologic agents to architectural, engineering, and land-use problems.
                                                        Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                        GEOL 111-101 GEOLOGY LAB OMAR, GOMAA M 0230PM-0530PM Hands-on study of earth materials and processes. Identification and interpretation of rocks, minerals and fossils. Topographic and geologic maps. Evolution of landscapes. Field trips lead to a synthesis of the geologic history of southeastern Pennsylvania.
                                                          GEOL 130-601 OCEANOGRAPHY BORDEAUX, YVETTE R 0530PM-0830PM The oceans cover over 2/3 of the Earth's surface. This course introduces basic oceanographic concepts such as plate tectonics, marine sediments, physical and chemical properties of seawater, ocean circulation, air-sea interactions, waves, tides, nutrient cycles in the ocean, biology of the oceans, and environmental issues related to the marine environment.
                                                            Physical World Sector (all classes) ONLY OPEN TO LPS STUDENTS; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR; COLLEGE QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS REQ.; QUANTITATIVE DATA ANALYSIS COURSE
                                                            GEOL 201-401 MINERALOGY OMAR, GOMAA M 0100PM-0200PM
                                                            W 0100PM-0300PM
                                                            Crystallography, representative minerals, their chemical and physical properties. Use of petrographic microscope in identifying common rock-forming minerals in thin section.
                                                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                              GEOL 201-402 LABORATORY OMAR, GOMAA W 0330PM-0600PM Crystallography, representative minerals, their chemical and physical properties. Use of petrographic microscope in identifying common rock-forming minerals in thin section.
                                                                SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                GEOL 204-001 GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE MARINOV, IRINA TR 1030AM-1200PM Public perceptions and attitudes concerning the causes and importance of globalwarming have changed. Global Climate Change provides a sound theoretical understanding of global warming through an appreciation of the Earth's climate system and how and why this has changed through time. We will describe progress in understanding of the human and natural drivers of climate change, climate pr0cesses and attribution, and estimates of projected future climate change. We will assess scientific, tehnical, and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of climate change, its potential impacts and options for adaptation and mitigation.
                                                                  Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PHYSICAL WORLD SECTOR
                                                                  GEOL 204-101 LABORATORY MARINOV, IRINA F 1100AM-1200PM Public perceptions and attitudes concerning the causes and importance of globalwarming have changed. Global Climate Change provides a sound theoretical understanding of global warming through an appreciation of the Earth's climate system and how and why this has changed through time. We will describe progress in understanding of the human and natural drivers of climate change, climate pr0cesses and attribution, and estimates of projected future climate change. We will assess scientific, tehnical, and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of climate change, its potential impacts and options for adaptation and mitigation.
                                                                    Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                    GEOL 204-789 LABORATORY Public perceptions and attitudes concerning the causes and importance of globalwarming have changed. Global Climate Change provides a sound theoretical understanding of global warming through an appreciation of the Earth's climate system and how and why this has changed through time. We will describe progress in understanding of the human and natural drivers of climate change, climate pr0cesses and attribution, and estimates of projected future climate change. We will assess scientific, tehnical, and socio-economic information relevant for the understanding of climate change, its potential impacts and options for adaptation and mitigation.
                                                                      Physical World Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                      GEOL 205-401 PALEONTOLOGY SALLAN, LAUREN CANCELED Geologic history of invertebrates and their inferred life habits, paleoecology, and evolution. Introduction to paleobotany and vertebrate paleontology.
                                                                        Living World Sector (all classes) LIVING WORLD SECTOR
                                                                        GEOL 206-401 STRATIGRAPHY JEROLMACK, DOUGLAS TR 0900AM-1030AM Introductory sedimentary concepts, stratigraphic principles, depositional environments, and interpretation of the rock record in a paleoecological setting.
                                                                          GEOL 405-401 ADVANCED PALEONTOLOGY CANCELED Relationship of fossil assemblages to life assemblages; structure of ancient communities, and interaction of organisms with each other and with the physicalenvironment; evolution of communities.
                                                                            GEOL 411-001 INTRO SOIL SCIENCE PLANTE, ALAIN MW 0200PM-0330PM Soil is considered the "skin of the Earth", with interfaces between the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. It is a mixture of minerals, organic matter, gases, liquids and a myriad of organisms that can support plant life. As such, soil is a natural body that exists as part of the environment. This course will examine the nature, properties, formation and environmental functions of soil.
                                                                              GEOL 418-001 GEOCHEMISTRY GIERE, RETO W 0200PM-0500PM This course provides a comprehensive introduction to theory and applications of chemistry in the earth and environmental sciences. Theory covered will include atomic structure, chemical bonding, cosmic abundances, nucleosynthesis,radioactive decay, dating of geological materials, stable isotopes, acid-base equilibria, salts and solutions, and oxidation-reduction reactions. Applications will emphasize oceanography, atmospheric sciences and environmental chemistry, as well as other topics depending on the interests of the class. Although we will review the basics, this course is intended to supplement, rather than to replace, courses offered in the Department of Chemistry. It is appropriate for advanced undergraduate as well as graduate students in Geology, Environmental Science, Chemistry and other sciences, who wish to have a better understanding of these important chemical processes.
                                                                                GEOL 424-001 GEOMICROBIOLOGY PEREZ-RODRIGUEZ, ILEANA TR 0300PM-0430PM
                                                                                  GEOL 453-001 INTRO TO HYDROLOGY GOLDSBY, DAVID TR 0130PM-0300PM Introduction to the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle and water budgets, precipitation and infiltration, evaporation and transpiration, stream flow, hydrograph analysis (floods), subsurface and groundwater flow, well hydraulics, water quality, and frequency analysis.
                                                                                    GEOL 498-001 SENIOR THESIS DMOCHOWSKI, JANE M 1100AM-1200PM The culmination of the Earth Science major. Students, while working with an advisor in their concentration, conduct research and write a thesis.
                                                                                      GEOL 506-401 ADVANCED STRATIGRAPHY JEROLMACK, DOUGLAS TR 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                        GEOL 528-690 AQUEOUS GEOCHEMISTRY ANDREWS, MARIA-ANTONIA R 0530PM-0810PM This course is designed to provide the graduate student with an understanding of the fundamentals of aqueous geochemistry.The chemistry of water,air and soil will be studied from an environmental perspective.The nature, composition, structure, and properties of pollutants coupled with the major chemical mechanisms controlling the occurrence and mobility of chemicals in the environment will also be studied.Upon completion of this course, students should expect to have attained a broad understanding of and familiarity with aqueous geochemistry concepts applicable to the environmental field. Environmental issues that will becovered include acid deposition, toxic metal contamination, deforestation,and anthropogenic perturbed aspects of the earth's hydrosphere.
                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                          GEOL 531-401 ADVANCED MINERALOGY OMAR, GOMAA M 0100PM-0200PM
                                                                                          W 0100PM-0300PM
                                                                                          Advanced crystallography, representative minerals, their chemical and physical properties. Use of petrographic microscope in identifying common rock-forming minerals in thin section.
                                                                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                            GEOL 531-402 LABORATORY OMAR, GOMAA W 0330PM-0600PM Advanced crystallography, representative minerals, their chemical and physical properties. Use of petrographic microscope in identifying common rock-forming minerals in thin section.
                                                                                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                                                              GEOL 651-690 GEOCOMPUTATIONS MASTROPAOLO, CARL M 0600PM-0900PM Review and applications of selected methods from differential equations, advanced engineering mathematics and geostatistics to problems encountered in geology, engineering geology, geophysics and hydrology.
                                                                                                GEOL 653-690 Introduction to Hydrology SAUDER, J. W 0600PM-0900PM Introcudction to the basic principles of the hydrologic cycle and water budgets, precipitation and infiltration, evaporation and transpiration, stream flow, hydrograph analysis (floods), subsurface and groundwater flow, well hydraulics, water quality, and frequency analysis.
                                                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                  GEOL 654-690 GEOMECHANICS: SOLIDS DUDA, GEORGE T 0600PM-0900PM Mechanical properties of solid and fluid earth materials, stress and strain, earth pressures in soil and rock, tunnels, piles, and piers; flow through gates, wiers, spillways and culverts, hydraulics, seepage and Darcy's law as applied to the hydrologic sciences.
                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                    GEOL 670-690 Engineering Geology: Rock Mechanics FREED, CHAD W 0600PM-0900PM This course focuses on the rock mechanics aspects of Engineering Geology. The theme is characterization of the geologic environment for engineering and environmental investigations. Covered are the various exploration tools and methods, including: Collection and analysis of existing engineering data; Interpretation of remotely sensed imagery; Field and laboratory measurements of material properties; Measurement and characterization of rock discontinuities; Rock slope stability analysis; Stress, strain and failure of rocks and the importance of scale; Rock core logging; Rock mass rating; Rock support and reinforcement; Rock excavation, blasting and blast monitoring and control.
                                                                                                      GEOL 696-690 Advanced Geologic Field Methods CRON, MITCH CANCELED The purpose of this course is advanced study in geologic field methods. Field methods will include use of air monitoring, soil sampling, geophysics and remote sensing equipment. Each of the field methods will be implemented on a Pennsylvania Site. This course will meet during five Saturdays over the course of the semester.
                                                                                                        GEOL 750-301 TOPICS IN EARTH SCIENCE SALLAN, LAUREN W 0700PM-0900PM
                                                                                                        F 1100AM-1200PM
                                                                                                        This course will use the weekly EES seminar series to survey historic breakthrogh papers or topics in the earth sciences, as well as modern papers - written by the seminar speakers - that often put the classics in perspective. Graduate students (Ph.D. only) in the Department of Earth and Environmental Science will engage in the material through reading, presentation, and discussion. The course has several goals. (1.) To engender an understanding and appreciation of major breakthroughs in our field. (2.) To develop skills in presenting and discussing scientific results. And (3.) to refine students' understanding of what constitutes great science.

                                                                                                          Department of Earth and Environmental Science / University of Pennsylvania, 251 Hayden Hall, 240 South 33rd Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6316