Penn Lightbulb Cafe

Upcoming events in this series:

Feb
23

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Campbell GreyAssociate Professor of Classical StudiesAn Earthquake That Shook the World: Seismicity and Societal Change in the Fourth Century C.E. World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Early in the reign of the brothers Valentinian and Valens, a massive earthquake shook the eastern Mediterranean. The July 21, 365 C.E., quake had an estimated magnitude between 8.0 and 8.5 on the Richter scale. Archaeological evidence has shown that destruction of buildings and temples spread from Crete to other parts of the Mediterranean. The earthquake is frequently connected to a tsunami that reached as far as Croatia, northwestern Greece, Libya, and Egypt. Grey will discuss the considerable literary, historical, and archaeoseismological challenges that attend the project of reconstructing this earthquake and tsunami.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Apr
5

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Michael HorowitzAssociate Professor of Political ScienceWhy Leaders Fight World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

The co-author of Why Leaders Fight, Horowitz will discuss how world leaders engage in different types of military decision-making depending on their personal experiences in life. Compiling the biographies of nearly 2,500 dictators, presidents, kings, heads of state, and prime ministers from around the world since the 1800s, Why Leaders Fight uses the largest set of data on leader backgrounds to create a scale for risk-aversion and propensity for violence. The researchers used this scale to see if it could predict the leaders’ behavior when it comes to military aggression, and it worked.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email bryangm@upenn.edu

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.