Penn Science Cafe

Hauling science out of the lab for a night on the town, the Penn Science Café offers the Philadelphia region an opportunity to pitch questions to leading scientific experts who drop the jargon to explain their work in layman's terms. All Penn Science Café events are free and open to the public.

Upcoming events in this series:

Mar
1

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Michael WeisbergProfessor of PhilosophyPublic (Mis)understanding of Evolution World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Ten years have passed since the Kitzmiller v. Dover trial, one of the most prominent public forays into evolution in recent memory. But in the decade since, what has changed about the perception of this topic? Michael Weisberg, an expert on scientific methods and evolutionary biology, discusses what we currently know about evolution, why people are still confused about it, what role religion and background play in their perceptions, and what he learned on a recent research trip to the Galapagos to document evolution in action. He’ll share photos and video from the Galapagos trip and a preview of the short documentary series he and his colleagues are creating.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

Mar
15

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Brenda CasperProfessor of BiologyStudying Climate Change in a Land of Nomads: How Species Will Respond to New Conditions in the Mongolian Steppe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Industrialized nations bear the biggest responsibility in contributing to anthropogenic climate change, but even the most remote areas of the globe bear the consequences. Brenda Casper and her students have spent years studying how future climate change will impact northern Mongolia, a semi-arid steppe where nomadic herders have practiced their livelihoods in much the same way for thousands of years. In this talk, she will explain what their work is revealing about how plants and soil bacterial communities will respond to future warming and land-use change and what that will mean for the region.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.