Courses for Spring 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
DTCH 102-050 DUTCH PRE-INTERMEDIATE 2 Continuation of DTCH 101.
    STUDY ABROAD
    DTCH 104-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT WILLIAMS HALL 633 TR 0430PM-0600PM A fourth semester Dutch language course.
      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
      DTCH 504-401 INTERMEDIATE DUTCH II NABORN, ROBERT WILLIAMS HALL 633 TR 0430PM-0600PM
        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
        GRMN 101-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 6 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
          LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
          GRMN 101-050 A1.1 - BEGINNERS GERMAN FOR EXCHANGE AND MASTER STUDENTS Designed for the beginning student with no previous knowledge of German. German 101, as the first course in the first-year series, focuses on the development of language competence in listening, speaking, reading, and writing. By the end of the semester, students will be able to engage in simple conversations about familiar things, know greetings and everyday expressions, they will be ble to count and tell time, and negate sentences in day-to-day contexts. Furthermore, students will be able to speak about events that happened in the immediate past and express plans for the future. In addition, students will have developed reading strategies that allow them to glean information from simple newspaper and magazine articles and short literary texts. Because cultural knowledge is one of the foci of German 101, students will learn much about practical life in Germany and will explore German-speaking cultures on the Internet.
            STUDY ABROAD
            GRMN 102-001 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II GWIN, CHRISTOPHER WILLIAMS HALL 303 MTWRF 1100AM-1200PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
              LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
              GRMN 102-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 24 MTWRF 1200PM-0100PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                GRMN 102-003 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II CANCELED This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                  GRMN 102-050 BASIC GERMAN A1; PART 2 This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                    STUDY ABROAD
                    GRMN 102-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI VAN PELT LIBRARY 113 MW 0630PM-0815PM This course is a continuation of GRMN 101 and is designed to strengthen and expand students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing competence and to deepen an understanding of German-speaking cultures. By the end of the course, students will be able to handle a variety of day-to-day needs in a German-speaking setting and engage in simple conversations about personally significant topics. Students can expect to be able to order food and beverages, purchase things, and to be familiar with the German university system, the arts, and current social topics. Students will begin to be able to talk aboutthe past and the future, make comparisons, describe people and things in increasing detail, make travel plans that include other European countries, and make reservations in hotels and youth hostels. By the end of the course students will be able to talk about their studies and about their dreams for the future. In In addition, students will develop reading strategies that should allow them tounderstand the general meaning of articles, and short literary texts. Furthermore, students will feel more able to understand information when hearing German speakers talking about familiar topics. Cultural knowledge remains among one of the foci of German 102, and students will continue to be exposed to authentic materials.
                      LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                      GRMN 103-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I FREI, CHRISTINA WILLIAMS HALL 25 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM This course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competence, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules and prepares students well for GRMN 104 and a minor or major in German.
                        LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                        GRMN 104-001 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 201 MTWR 1100AM-1200PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                          SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                          GRMN 104-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 201 MTWR 1200PM-0100PM A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                            GRMN 104-003 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL CANCELED A continuation of GRMN 103. Expands students writing and speaking competence in German, increases vocabulary and helps students practice effective reading and listening strategies. Our in-class discussions are based on weekly readings of literary and non-literary texts to facilitate exchange of information, ideas, reactions, and opinions. In addition, the readings provide cultural and historical background information. The review of grammar will not be the primary focus of the course. Students will, however, expand and deepen their knowledge of grammar through specific grammar exercises. Students will conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                              GRMN 107-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 203
                              WILLIAMS HALL 203
                              MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                              TR 1030AM-1200PM
                              This course is intensive and is intended for dedicated, highly self-motivated students who will take responsibility for their learning and creation of meaning with their peers. This accelerated course is designed to improve students writing and speaking competencies, to increase vocabulary, to deepen grammar usage, and to help develop effective reading and listening strategies in German across literary genres and media as students interpret and analyze cultural, political, and historical moments in German-speaking countries and compare them with their own cultural practices. This course is organized around content-based modules. Students conclude the basic-language program at PENN by reading an authentic literary text; offering the opportunity to practice and deepen reading knowledge and to sensitize cultural and historical awareness of German-speaking countries.
                                SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                GRMN 180-001 GERMAN IN RESIDENCE ZAMBON, KATE TBA TBA- The German House is a half-credit course with concentrations in German conversation, film, and culture. Though many students enroll for credit, others often come to select events. All interested parties are invited, and you do not have to actually live in the house to enroll for credit. Students from all different levels of language proficiency are welcome. Beginners learn from more advanced students, and all enjoy a relaxed environment for maintaining or improving their German language skills.
                                  LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
                                  GRMN 203-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 201 MWF 1000AM-1100AM In this course, you will explore themes of cultural and historical significance in contemporary German-speaking countries through literature and nonfiction, through film and current event media coverage. Whether you wish to dive deeply into historical or political contexts, explore untranslatable cultural phenomena or the aesthetic rhythm and semantic complexity of the German language, GRMN 203 Texts and Contexts will inspire your imagination and deepen your understanding of German language, culture and literature. This is a required course for all courses taught in German at or above the 200 level.
                                    CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                    GRMN 220-001 Business German: A Micro Perspective JAMES, DAVID WILLIAMS HALL 29 TR 0900AM-1030AM This course is designed to enhance your speaking, reading and writing skills, in addition to helping you build a strong foundation in business vocabulary. Course objectives include acquiring skills in cross cultural communication, teamwork, business management, and creating a business plan. German grammar will be covered on a need be basis. This course will prepare you to perform and contribute while in a German-speaking business environment.
                                      FOREIGN LANG ACROSS CURRICULUM (FLAC) CRSE; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                      GRMN 232-401 TOPICS IN EUROPEAN HIST: NAZI GERMANY: POWER AND IDEOLOGY STEINBERG, JONATHAN
                                      KANT, MARION
                                      FISHER-BENNETT HALL 244 T 0130PM-0430PM The title for Fall 2017 is: The Nazi Revolution: Power and Ideology. More than seventy years have passed since Nazi Germany surrendered unconditionally to the Allied Powers on May 8, 1945, but no agreement has emerged on what Nazism was, how Hitler’s regime functioned, how much support it had, why and how they attempted the extermination of the entire Jewish people, whether it was ‘a terror state’ or rested on a broad popular consensus. This course will look at Nazism from several angles, and focus in particular on the power of its ideology and its embodiment and dissemination by the arts. Nazism took the arts very seriously. Hitler always saw himself as an artist and he made certain that the regime expressed the Nazi ‘revolution’ in new and radical forms of art, especially a new culture of the body – strength and beauty combined in a pure, warlike Aryan. The course will investigate the development of the avant-garde arts beyond the first third of the 20th century into the politics of the Nazi regime. We will focus on the relationship between art and politics in the “Age of extremes” (Eric Hobsbawm). The course will also look at the nature of Nazi power and the structure of the Nazi state: how it developed and grew after 1933. The rearmament of Germany and the smashing of the Versailles settlement of 1919, two main aims of Nazi foreign policy, were accomplished by 1936, and the growth of the power of the SS changed the internal politics of the regime. Was ‘terror’ essential to Hitler’s regime and what does the word ‘describe’? Finally the course will consider the war and Hitler’s aims for world conquest, the extermination of the Jews and the final stage of complete destructiveness at home and abroad.
                                        ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                        GRMN 249-401 TOPICS IN MODERNISM: BECKETT AND KAFKA RABATE, JEAN-MICHEL FISHER-BENNETT HALL 222 TR 0900AM-1030AM This course explores an aspect of literary modernism intensively; specific course topics will vary from year to year. Topic title for Spring 2018: Modernism and the Theory of Fashion. In this class we will study international modernism from 1860 to 1940 by focusing on the emergence of a concept of the "new" that was also understood as a "new fashion." What was the "fashion of the new," how was it linked with "fashion" itself? The rise of modernism was accompanied by a series of self-conscious discourses in fashion, the first of which were elaborated by Beaudelaire & Malla rme. We will follow the social uses of the "new" in the context of the fashion industry so as to map a cultural history of "fashion" as it was developed by Walter Benjamin and Georg Simmel. We will read through Beaudelaire and Mallarme's prose and poetry, then engage with Aragon's Surrealist novel Paris Peasant, after which we will survey selected sections of Benjamin's Arcades Project. All the while, the Fashion Theory: A Reader will serve as our theoretical guide. This class will be devoted to parallel readings of Beckett’s and Kafka’s major works. Beckett and Kafka are often lumped together: they would share a pessimistic view of life, be concerned with the absurd, and propagate a modern nihilism, with a hint of a negative theology underpinning all this. T. W. Adorno, for one, insisted on their proximity in spite of Beckett’s own resistance. Beckett seems to have put Kafka at a safe distance and criticized him for not being experimental enough. We will have to make sense of Adorno’s interpretation by looking at the play Endgame read alongside Kafka’s stories like “Hunter Gracchus.” Then, by focusing on major novels like Watt and The Castle, and The Unnamable and The Trial, and by comparing the techniques of short story and fragmentary writing, we will investigate Beckett’s and Kafka’s aesthetics. In the end, we will pose the question of whether a single critical discourse can encompass their works or whether different hermeneutics are required. Requirements: one oral presentation and two papers (10 and 15 pages).
                                          ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                          GRMN 253-401 FREUD WEISSBERG, LILIANE ANNENBERG SCHOOL 110 TR 1030AM-1200PM No other person of the twentieth century has probably influenced scientific thought, humanistic scholarship, medical therapy, and popular culture as much as Sigmund Freud. This course will study his work, its cultural background, and its impact on us today. In the first part of the course, we will learn about Freud's life and the Viennese culture of his time. We will then move to a discussion of seminal texts, such as excerpts from his Interpretation of Dreams, case studies, as well as essays on psychoanalytic practice, human development, definitions of gender and sex, neuroses, and culture in general. In the final part of the course, we will discuss the impact of Freud's work. Guest lectureres from the medical field, history of science, psychology, and the humnities will offer insights into the reception of Freud's work, and its consequences for various fields of study and therapy.
                                            Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                            GRMN 257-401 FASCIST CINEMAS MACLEOD, CATRIONA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 407 MW 1100AM-1200PM Cinema played a crucial role in the cultural life of Nazi Germany and other fascist states. As cinema enthusiasts, Goebbels and Hitler were among the first to realize the important ideological potential of film as a mass medium and saw to it that Germany remained a cinema powerhouse producing more than 1000 films during the Nazi era. In Italy, Mussolini, too, declared cinema "the strongest weapon." This course explores the world of "fascist" cinemas ranging from infamous propaganda pieces such as The Triumph of the Will to popular entertainments such as musicals and melodramas. It examines the strange and mutually defining kinship between fascism more broadly and film. We will consider what elements mobilize and connect the film industries of the Axis Powers: style, genre, the aestheticization of politics, the creation of racialized others. More than seventy years later, fascist cinemas challenge us to grapple with issues of more subtle ideological insinuation than we might think. Weekly screenings with subtitles.
                                              Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                              GRMN 264-401 TRANSLATING CULTURES: TRANSLATING CULTURES: LITERATURE ON AND IN TRANSLATION HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN WILLIAMS HALL 306 TR 0300PM-0430PM "Languages are not strangers to one another," writes the great critic and translator Walter Benjamin. Yet two people who speak different languages have a difficult time talking to one another, unless they both know a third, common language or can find someone who knows both their languages to translate what they want to say. Without translation, most of us would not be able to read the Bible or Homer, the foundations of Western culture. Americans wouldn't know much about the cultures of Europe, China, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. And people who live in or come from these places would not know much about American culture. Without translation, Americans would not know much about the diversity of cultures within America. The very fabric of our world depend upon translation between people, between cultures, between texts. With a diverse group of readings--autobiography, fiction, poetry, anthrology, and literary theory--this course will address some fundamental questions about translating language and culture. What does it mean to translate? How do we read a text in translation? What does it mean to live between two languages? Who is a translator? What are different kinds of literary and cultural translation? what are their principles and theories? Their assumptions and practices? Their effects on and implications for the individual and the society? “Languages are not strangers to one another,” writes the great critic and translator Walter Benjamin. Yet two people who speak different languages have a difficult time talking to one another, unless they both know a third, common language or can find someone who knows both their languages to translate what they want to say. Without translation, most of us would not be able to read the Bible or Homer, the foundations of Western culture. Americans wouldn't know much about the cultures of Europe, China, Africa, South America, and the Middle East. And people who live in or come from these places would not know much about American culture. Without translation, Americans would not know much about the multiplicity of cultures within America. The very fabric of our world depends upon translation between people, between cultures, between texts. With a diverse selection of readings—autobiography, fiction, poetry, anthropology, and literary theory—this course will address some fundamental questions about translating language and culture. What does it mean to translate? How do we read a text in translation? What does it mean to live between two languages? Who is a translator? What are different kinds of literary and cultural translation? What are their principles and theories? Their assumptions and practices? Their effects on and implications for the individual and the society? In Spring 2017, the course will be enriched by several sessions on musical performance and the visual arts, as well, in order to expand the questions about translation beyond the media of language to those of sound and vision. In addition, we will likely spend a class, or maybe two, in the Penn Museum of Archaeology looking at artifacts that are in and of themselves translations.
                                                Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR; ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINARS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS; BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEMINAR
                                                GRMN 298-050 GERMAN DISCOURSE & CULTURE III For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                  STUDY ABROAD
                                                  GRMN 298-051 MUNICH AND NATIONAL SOCIALISM For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                    STUDY ABROAD
                                                    GRMN 298-052 TOPIC IN GERMAN STUDIES: EXILE LIT, PRAGUE/MUNICH/NYC For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                      STUDY ABROAD
                                                      GRMN 298-053 M-COMMUNICATION/MEDIA: THEORIES INTERCULTURAL COMM For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                        STUDY ABROAD
                                                        GRMN 298-054 ADVANCED GERMAN LANGUAGE II For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                          STUDY ABROAD
                                                          GRMN 298-055 WRITTEN COMMUNIC & EXPRESSION For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                            STUDY ABROAD
                                                            GRMN 298-056 GERMAN DRAMA AND THEATRE For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                              STUDY ABROAD
                                                              GRMN 298-057 CONTEMPORARY GERMAN CULTURE For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                STUDY ABROAD
                                                                GRMN 298-058 WHAT IS ENLIGHTENMENT? For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                  STUDY ABROAD
                                                                  GRMN 298-059 MULTI-LEVEL GOV. ENERGY POL. For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                    STUDY ABROAD
                                                                    GRMN 298-060 EU ENERGY POLITICS & GENDER For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                      STUDY ABROAD
                                                                      GRMN 298-061 GERMAN DISCOURSE & CULTURE I For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                        STUDY ABROAD
                                                                        GRMN 298-062 THE CULTURAL HERITAGE OF VIENNA For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                          STUDY ABROAD
                                                                          GRMN 298-063 VIENNA THEATER II For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                            STUDY ABROAD
                                                                            GRMN 298-064 EMERGING COMPETENT ABROAD III- ADVANCED GERMAN For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                              STUDY ABROAD
                                                                              GRMN 298-065 GERMAN DISCOURSE AND CULTURE For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                                STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                GRMN 298-066 INTERCULTURAL LEARNING For use only by students who have studied in Penn-Approved year abroad programs. Consult Undergraduate Chair before signing up for this course.
                                                                                  STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                  GRMN 301-001 HANDSCHRIFT-HYPERTEXT FREI, CHRISTINA WILLIAMS HALL 304 MW 0200PM-0330PM This course will provide an introduction to German-language literary studies through exemplary readings of short forms: fables, fairy tales, aphorisms, stories, novellas, feuilletons, poems, songs, radio plays, film clips, web projects and others. Paying particular attention to how emergent technology influences genre, we will trace an evolution from Minnesang to rock songs, from early print culture to the internet age and from Handschrift to hypertext. Students will have ample opportunity to improve their spoken and written German through class discussion and a series of internet-based assignments. Readings and discussions in German.
                                                                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                                                                                    GRMN 323-001 WRITING IN DARK TIMES RICHTER, SIMON WILLIAMS HALL 303 TR 1200PM-0130PM The rise of Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 radically disrupted the literary marketplace in Germany. Public book burnings were the most visible sign of a complete reorganization of the literary world. What was it like to be a writer in the Third Reich? How did censorship work? What kind of choices were writers forced to make? What political roles did writers adopt? Under what conditions could they publish? Who read their books and how did they read them? These are some of the questions we will ask as we become acquainted with German writers in ideological adherence or alliance, in exile throughout Europe and the Americas, in "inner emigration," even in concentration camps, and in hiding. By focusing on their writing, we will shed light on the value of literature in dark times. The rise of Hitler and the Nazis in 1933 radically disrupted the literary marketplace in Germany. Public book burnings were the most visible sign of a complete reorganization of the literary world. What was it like to be a writer in the Third Reich? How did censorship work? What kind of choices were writers forced to make? What political roles did writers adopt? Under what conditions could they publish? Who read their books and how did they read them? These are some of the questions we will ask as we become acquainted with German writers in ideological adherence or alliance, in exile throughout Europe and the Americas, in “inner emigration,” even in concentration camps, and in hiding. By focusing on their writing, we will shed light on the value of literature in dark times.
                                                                                      GRMN 403-301 SENIOR COLLOQUIUM FLEISHMAN, IAN TBA TBA-
                                                                                        PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT
                                                                                        GRMN 501-001 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I CANCELED
                                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                          GRMN 501-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN I TBA TBA-
                                                                                            UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                            GRMN 502-001 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II TBA TBA-
                                                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                              GRMN 502-002 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II JAMES, DAVID
                                                                                                UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                GRMN 502-601 ELEMENTARY GERMAN II MCKINLEY, LUSI VAN PELT LIBRARY 113 MW 0630PM-0815PM
                                                                                                  PERMISSION NEEDED FROM DEPARTMENT; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                  GRMN 503-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN I FREI, CHRISTINA
                                                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                    GRMN 504-001 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II LYNN, CLAUDIA
                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                      GRMN 504-002 INTERMEDIATE GERMAN II SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL
                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                        GRMN 506-401 TEXTS AND CONTEXTS LYNN, CLAUDIA WILLIAMS HALL 201 MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                                                          CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                                                                                                          GRMN 514-401 ACCELERATED INTERMD GRMN SAYILI-HURLEY, SIBEL WILLIAMS HALL 203
                                                                                                          WILLIAMS HALL 203
                                                                                                          MWF 1000AM-1100AM
                                                                                                          TR 1030AM-1200PM
                                                                                                            SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                            GRMN 525-401 SCHELLING,GOETHE,NATURE RICHTER, SIMON
                                                                                                            HAHMANN, ANDREE
                                                                                                            STITELER HALL B30 R 0300PM-0600PM Although the starting point for the Anthropocne is still under discussion, there is broad agreement that the industrial revolution and the turn to fossil fuels mark an intensification of humanity's impact on the Earth. It may not be a coincidence that Kant's proclamation of the Copernican revolution in philosophy, according to which human reason replaces the natural light of traditional metaphysics, falls roughly in the same period. Human finite cognition became the measure for God and his creation. The dawn of the era of human freedom and the ramped up exploitation of resources coincide. It is against this background that the Naturphilosophie of F. W. J. Schelling can become particularly interesting. The genesis of German idealism is closely related with the opposition between freedom and necessity that lies at the heart of Kant's critical project. Kant associated the former with man and the latter with nature. In trying to bridge the gap between them, Schelling reinstates nature as an autonomous actor in its own right. Schelling's thinking about nature chimed with the literary and empirical-scientific work of his contemporary Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. In the productive interplay of poetry, science, religion, and philosophical thought, Goethe and Schelling offer a critical alternative to philosophy in the aftermath of the Copernican revolution that may be viable or useful today as humanity tries to come to terms with anthropogenically induced climate change. This co-taught interdisciplinary seminar will focus on works by Schelling (Ideas for a Philosophy of Nature, First Outline of a System of the Philosophy of Nature, On the World Soul) and Goethe (scientific writings, Faust I & II), in addition to engaging recent scholarship of Schelling and Goethe in relation to environmental humanities. Although the starting point for the Anthropocene is still under discussion, there is broad agreement that the industrial revolution and the turn to fossil fuels mark an intensification of humanity’s impact on the Earth. It may not be a coincidence that Kant’s proclamation of the Copernican revolution in philosophy, according to which human reason replaces the natural light of traditional metaphysics, falls roughly in the same period. Human finite cognition became the measure for God and his creation. The dawn of the era of human freedom and the ramped up exploitation of resources coincide. It is against this background that the Naturphilosophie of F. W. J. Schelling can become particularly interesting. The genesis of German idealism is closely related with the opposition between freedom and necessity that lies at the heart of Kant’s critical project. Kant associated the former with man and the latter with nature. In trying to bridge the gap between them, Schelling reinstates nature as an autonomous actor in its own right. Schelling’s thinking about nature chimed with the literary and empirical-scientific work of his contemporary Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. In the productive interplay of poetry, science, religion, and philosophical thought, Goethe and Schelling offer a critical alternative to philosophy in the aftermath of the Copernican revolution that may be viable or useful today as humanity tries to come to terms with anthropogenically induced climate change. This co-taught interdisciplinary seminar will focus on works by Schelling (Ideas for a Philosophy of Nature, First Outline of a System of the Philosophy of Nature, On the World Soul) and Goethe (scientific writings, Faust I & II), in addition to engaging recent scholarship on Schelling and Goethe in relation to environmental humanities.
                                                                                                              ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                                                              GRMN 552-401 KANT II: From Enlightenment towards perpetual peace: Kant's political philosophy HAHMANN, ANDREE CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 TR 1030AM-1200PM A study of Kant's moral philosophy, political philosophy, and aesthetics, focusing on his Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, Critique of Practical Reason, Metaphysics of Morals, and Critique of Judgement. This course is a study of Kant's moral and political philosophy. The central theme of the course is Kant's conviction that freedom or "Autonomy" is our most basic value, and that the fundamental law of morality as well as the more particular principles of both justice and personal virtue are the means that are necessary in order to preserve and promote the existence and exercise of human freedom. Central questions will be how Kant attempts to motivate or prove the fundamental value of freedom and the connection between this normative issue and his metaphysics of free will. Texts will include Kant's Lectures on Ethics, Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, Critique of Practical Reason, Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, and Metaphysics of Morals. Written work for the course will include one short paper and one term paper.
                                                                                                                GRMN 578-401 TOPICS IN ART HISTORY: Seventeenth Century Dutch and Flemish Art SILVER, LARRY VAN PELT LIBRARY 625 M 0330PM-0630PM Topics vary. Fall 2016: 16 C. North Paint/Graphc. 16th Century Northern Paintings and Graphics. Focusing primarily on Germany and the Netherlands during the period of the nascent Reformation, this course will use both paintings and prints to investigate a host of social and cultural changes: to the religious image and its use (including Iconoclasm), to political structures (the Holy Roman Empire and developing nation-states, such as Spain and England), and to innovative artistic themes, particularly the rise of specialized pictorial genres and secular subjects. Major artists will include Hieronymus Bosch, Albrecht Durer and his circle, Lucas Cranach, Hans Holbein (and England), Lucas van Leyden, and Pieter Bruegel. Students will be expected to write a research paper of their choosing after completing a shorter analysis paper on a single work. Open to qualified undergraduates as well as graduate students. Spring 2017: This seminar will focus on the history and interpretation of Dutch and Flemish painting, particularly the seeming "realism" of landscape, still-life, and genre scenes as well as some of the major figures of the period for their distinctive contributions (including Rubens and Rembrandt, but not dominated by them): Jan Brueghel, Frans Hals, Jan Steen, Jacob van Ruisdael, David Teniers, Jan Vermeer, and others. Who were the consumers of such works? How did the burgeoning market for inexpensive art in the form of paintings on canvas and prints affect production and types of art? How can we understand these works in their original urban, middle-class setting?
                                                                                                                  ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                                                                                  GRMN 614-401 GOETHE&PERCEPTION LANDSC: WEIMAR LANDSCAPES WEISSBERG, LILIANE
                                                                                                                  HUNT, JOHN
                                                                                                                  VAN PELT LIBRARY 627 T 0200PM-0400PM This new course is designed for students of literature, landscape architecture and urban planning, and cultural history in general. It will explore the ideas of, and attitudes towards, landscape in selected works by Johann Wolfgang Goethe, and consider his own considerable practical involvement in reshaping the town and gardens of Weimar. The course will provide the larger context of German literature, aesthetics and landscape taste, and politics of the later 18th and early 19th centuries. We will consider the development of new gardens and parks in a "new" style (e.g. Woerlitz); they were regarded to be less formal and more "natural" than their French predecessors. We will study the English models for this movement, and offer a particular attention to the major German theorist, C.C.L. Hirschfeld, who would soon become famous outside Germany as well. Students will be expected (but not required) to read in German. Translations of key works by Goethe, as well as of commentaries on German gardening history, are available to ensure that non-German speakers can readily follow the course. In final papers there will be the freedom to select topics that focus upon literary or landscape architecture, though it is anticipaed that a comparativist perspective will be adopted in either approach.
                                                                                                                    ALL READINGS AND LECTURES IN ENGLISH
                                                                                                                    GRMN 700-301 RESEARCH WORKSHOP WILLIAMS HALL 438 T 0900AM-1030AM
                                                                                                                      SCND 104-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills. This is a fourth semester, intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and out-of-class interactions, you will engage with your peers, other language learners, and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will explore and research Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society are adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, short works of fiction, etc. During the fall semester, we had several in-class visits from native Swedish speakers, and we made a field trip to IKEA where we learned about many things, from the origin of those cryptic product name, to IKEA's policies on corporate social responsibility and sustainability. During the spring semester we are planning to make additional connections with Swedes in the Philadelphia region.
                                                                                                                        SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER PDF icon SCND104_Intermediate Swedish II Syllabus.pdf
                                                                                                                        SCND 298-050 SWEDISH I
                                                                                                                          STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                                          SCND 298-051 DANISH - INTEGRATED SKILLS
                                                                                                                            STUDY ABROAD
                                                                                                                            SCND 504-401 INTERMEDIATE SWEDISH II AAHREN, ANNIKA FISHER-BENNETT HALL 16 MWF 1100AM-1200PM Part two of the intermediate level Swedish course. Through in- and our-of-class interactions, you will continue to engage with your peers and native or fluent Swedish speakers. We will look at Swedish products, practices and perspectives, and we will discuss how Swedish culture and society ar adapting to a rapidly changing world. We will complement the course literature with relevant authentic sources, such as online media, films, newspapers, etc. With a small class size, we have the flexibility to adapt the content to individual interests, and you will have plenty of opportunity to contribute to the total learning experience while elevating your Swedish vocabulary, grammar and communication skills. See SCND104 for description and course syllabus.
                                                                                                                              SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER
                                                                                                                              YDSH 102-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER MCNEIL BUILDING 409 TR 1200PM-0130PM In this course, you can continue to develop basic reading, writing and speaking skills. Discover treasures of Yiddish culture: songs, literature, folklore, and films.
                                                                                                                                LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                YDSH 104-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN COLLEGE HALL 217 TR 1030AM-1200PM Continuation of YDSH 103. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.
                                                                                                                                  SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; ONE TERM COURSE
                                                                                                                                  YDSH 502-401 BEGINNING YIDDISH II BOTWINIK, ALEXANDER MCNEIL BUILDING 409 TR 1200PM-0130PM
                                                                                                                                    LANGUAGE SKILLS COURSE
                                                                                                                                    YDSH 504-401 INTERMEDIATE YIDDISH II HELLERSTEIN, KATHRYN COLLEGE HALL 217 TR 1030AM-1200PM Continuation of YDSH 503. Emphasis on reading texts and conversation.
                                                                                                                                      SEE SPECIAL MESSAGE IN DEPARTMENT HEADER; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; ONE TERM COURSE