ITAL531 - DANTE'S COMMEDIA I

Please check the department's website for the course description at: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/italians/graduate/courses Dante Visualizing: Dante Visualizing and Dante Visualized. Dante's Commedia has inspired art, but at the same time art is present within the Comedy itself, through images, metaphors, descriptions and even more concrete examples. This course aims at discussing these aspects, taking into consideration also the philosophical, political and religious background of these motifs. While analyzing images in and from the Commedia, we will look at illustrations and artistic interpretations, spanning from medieval illuminations and Renaissance printed boooks (mainly from Van Pelt Library) to contemporary examples, and focusing on artists such as Giotto, Botticelli, Michelangelo, Blake, Dore, and Dali. The course will be taught in English.
Section 301 - SEM
The course begins by considering the two key Italian predecessors to the Dantean opus: Durante’s sonnet sequence, Il Fiore (an Italian adaptation of the Roman de la Rose) and Brunetto Latini’s Il Tesoretto. We then turn to Dante’s Inferno and Purgatorio to analyze how these new literary departures were utilized. We will simultaneously focus on the interrelated problems of authority, representation, history, politics, and language in Dante’s deeply innovative texts. The conclusion of the course examines two important texts of Boccaccio and Petrarch that take the newly canonical Dante as a key point of departure. On the one hand, Boccaccio’s La Teseida explicitly explores war as an epic matter in its Dantean context. On the other hand, Petrarch’s Latin Africa is an implicit correction of Dante’s Commedia, written in the Italian vernacular.

F 0100PM-0400PM

BROWNLEE, KEVIN

Section 401 - SEM
The course begins by considering the two key Italian predecessors to the Dantean opus: Durante’s sonnet sequence, Il Fiore (an Italian adaptation of the Roman de la Rose) and Brunetto Latini’s Il Tesoretto. We then turn to Dante’s Inferno and Purgatorio to analyze how these new literary departures were utilized. We will simultaneously focus on the interrelated problems of authority, representation, history, politics, and language in Dante’s deeply innovative texts. The conclusion of the course examines two important texts of Boccaccio and Petrarch that take the newly canonical Dante as a key point of departure. On the one hand, Boccaccio’s La Teseida explicitly explores war as an epic matter in its Dantean context. On the other hand, Petrarch’s Latin Africa is an implicit correction of Dante’s Commedia, written in the Italian vernacular.
CANCELED
BROWNLEE, KEVIN