Chestnut T.J.

A nitrogen budget for late-successional hillslope tabonuco forest, Puerto Rico

A Nitrogen Budget for Late-Successional Hillslope Tabonuco Forest, Puerto Rico
Tamara J. Chestnut, Daniel J. Zarin, William H. McDowell and Michael Keller
Vol. 46, No. 1/3, New Perspectives on Nitrogen Recycling in the Temperate and Tropical Americas (Jul., 1999), pp. 85-108

Nitrogen budgets of late successional forested stands and watersheds provide baseline data against which the effects of small- and large-scale disturbances may be measured. Using previously published data and supplemental new data on gaseous N loss, we construct a N budget for hillslope tabonuco forest (HTF) stands in Puerto Rico. HTF stands are subject to frequent hurricanes and landslides; here, we focus on N fluxes in the late phase of inter-disturbance forest development. N inputs from atmospheric deposition (4-6 kg N/ha/yr) are exceeded by N outputs from groundwater, gaseous N loss, and particulate N loss (6.3-15.7 kg N/ha/yr). Late-successional HTF stands also sequester N in their aggrading biomass (8 kg N/ha/yr), creating a total budget imbalance of 8.3-19.7 kg N/ha/yr. We surmise that this imbalance may be accounted for by unmeasured inputs from above- and belowground N-fixation and/or slow depletion of the large N pool in soil organic matter. Spatial and temporal variability, especially that associated with gaseous exchange and soil organic matter N-mineralization, constrain the reliability of this N budget.

C and N dynamics in the riparian and hyporheic zones of a tropical stream, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

C and N Dynamics in the Riparian and Hyporheic Zones of a Tropical Stream, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico
Tamara J. Chestnut and William H. McDowell
Journal of the North American Benthological Society
Vol. 19, No. 2 (Jun., 2000), pp. 199-214

Hydrologic and chemical characteristics were determined for both riparian and hyporheic subsurface flow along a 100-m reach of a sandy-bottom tributary of the Rio Icacos in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Hydrologic data (vertical hydraulic gradient and hydraulic conductivity of streambed sediments) and the topographic and morphological features of the watershed indicated diffuse inputs of groundwater from the near-stream riparian zone along this site. Cumulative groundwater discharge, determined by tracer dilution techniques, was ∼1.5 L/s or 10% of the total stream discharge. Spatial heterogeneity in hydrologic and chemical properties of riparian and hyporheic sediments was large. Hydraulic conductivity explained much of the variation in NH<sub>4</sub>-N and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations, with highest concentrations in sites having low conductivity. A mass-balance approach was used to examine the influence of the near-stream zone on nutrient transport and retention. Outwelling riparian groundwater had the potential to increase stream N concentrations by up to 84% and DOC concentrations by up to 38% along our 100-m reach. Because stream concentrations were constant downstream despite this input, we conclude that significant N and C retention or loss were occurring in the near-stream zone. Lotic ecosystems and their associated riparian groundwater can have a quantitatively significant impact on the nutrient budgets of tropical headwater catchments.
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