Keller M.

Distribution of Nitrous Oxide and Regulators of Its Production across a Tropical Rainforest Catena in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

MCSWINEY, CLAIRE P.; MCDOWELL, WILLIAM H.; KELLER, MICHAEL 2001. Distribution of nitrous oxide and regulators of its production across a tropical rainforest catena in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Biogeochemistry 56: 265-286.

Understanding of N2O fluxes to the atmosphere is complicated by interactions between chemical and physical controls on both production and movement of the gas. To better understand how N2O production is controlled in the soil, we measured concentrations of N2O and of the proximal controllers on its production in soil water and soil air in a field study in the Rio Icacos basin of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. A toposequence (ridge, slope-ridge break, slope, slope-riparian break, riparian, and streambank) was used that has been previously characterized for groundwater chemistry and surface N2O fluxes. The proximal controls on N2O production include NO−3 , NH+4 , DOC, and O2. Nitrous oxide and O2 were measured in soil air and NO−3 , NH+4 , and DO were measured in soil water. Nitrate and DOC disappeared from soil solution at the slope-riparian interface, where soil N2O concentrations increased dramatically. Soil N2O concentrations continued to increase through the flood plain and the streambank. Nitrous oxide concentrations were highest in soil air probes that had intermediate O2 concentrations. Changes in N2O concentrations in groundwater and soil air in different environments along the catena appear to be controlled by O2 concentrations. In general, N processing in the unsaturated and saturated zones differs within each topographic position apparently due to differences in redox status.

Soil Oxygen Availability and Biogeochemistry along Rainfall and Topographic Gradients in Upland Wet Tropical Forest Soils

Silver W, Lugo AE, Keller M (1999) Soil oxygen availability and
biogeochemistry along rainfall and topographical gradients in
upland wet tropical forest soils. Biogeochemistry 44:301–

We measured soil oxygen concentrations at 10 and 35 cm depths and indices of biogeochemical cycling in upland forest soils along a rainfall and elevation gradient (3500– 5000 mm y−1; 350–1050 masl) and along topographic gradients (ridge to valley, 150 m) in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Along the rainfall gradient, soil O2 availability decreased significantly with increasing annual rainfall, and reached very low levels (<3%) in individual chambers for up to 25 consecutive weeks over 82 weeks of study. Along localized topographic gradients, soil O2 concentrations were variable and decreased significantly from ridges to valleys. In the valleys, up to 35% of the observations at 10–35 cm depth were <3% soil O2. Cross correlation analyses showed that soil O2 concentrations were significantly positively correlated along the topographic gradient, and were sensitive to rainfall and hydrologic output. Soil O2 concentrations in valley soils were correlated with rainfall from the previous day, while ridge sites were correlated with cumulative rainfall inputs over 4 weeks. Soils at the wettest point along the rainfall gradient had very high soil methane concentrations (3–24%) indicating a strong influence of anaerobic processes.We measured net methane emission to the atmosphere at the wettest sites of the rainfall gradient, and in the valleys along topographic gradients. Other measures of biogeochemical function such as soil organic matter content and P availability were sensitive to chronic O2 depletion along the rainfall gradient, but less sensitive to the variable soil O2 environment exhibited at lower elevations along topographic gradients.

A nitrogen budget for late-successional hillslope tabonuco forest, Puerto Rico

A Nitrogen Budget for Late-Successional Hillslope Tabonuco Forest, Puerto Rico
Tamara J. Chestnut, Daniel J. Zarin, William H. McDowell and Michael Keller
Vol. 46, No. 1/3, New Perspectives on Nitrogen Recycling in the Temperate and Tropical Americas (Jul., 1999), pp. 85-108

Nitrogen budgets of late successional forested stands and watersheds provide baseline data against which the effects of small- and large-scale disturbances may be measured. Using previously published data and supplemental new data on gaseous N loss, we construct a N budget for hillslope tabonuco forest (HTF) stands in Puerto Rico. HTF stands are subject to frequent hurricanes and landslides; here, we focus on N fluxes in the late phase of inter-disturbance forest development. N inputs from atmospheric deposition (4-6 kg N/ha/yr) are exceeded by N outputs from groundwater, gaseous N loss, and particulate N loss (6.3-15.7 kg N/ha/yr). Late-successional HTF stands also sequester N in their aggrading biomass (8 kg N/ha/yr), creating a total budget imbalance of 8.3-19.7 kg N/ha/yr. We surmise that this imbalance may be accounted for by unmeasured inputs from above- and belowground N-fixation and/or slow depletion of the large N pool in soil organic matter. Spatial and temporal variability, especially that associated with gaseous exchange and soil organic matter N-mineralization, constrain the reliability of this N budget.
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