Pett-Ridge J.C.

Ge/Si and sr-87/Sr-86 tracers of weathering reactions and hydrologic pathways in a tropical granitoid system

Derry, LA, JC Pett-Ridge, AC Kurtz, and JW Troester. 2006. Ge/Si and sr-87/Sr-86 tracers of weathering reactions and hydrologic pathways in a tropical granitoid system. Journal of Geochemical Exploration 88 (1-3) (JAN-MAR): 271-4.

Abstract: 
Ge/Si and 87Sr/86Sr data from primary and secondary minerals, soil waters, and stream waters in a tropical granitoid catchment quantitatively reflect mineral alteration reactions that occur at different levels within the bedrock–saprolite–soil zone. Near the bedrock–saprolite interface, plagioclase to kaolinite reaction yields low Ge/Si and 87Sr/86Sr. Higher in the regolith column, biotite weathering and kaolinite dissolution drive Ge/Si and 87Sr/86Sr to high values. Data from streams at base flow sample the bedrock–saprolite interface zone, while at high discharge solutes are derived from upper saprolite–soil zone. Coupled Ge/Si and 87Sr/86Sr can be effective tools for quantifying the importance of specific weathering reactions, and for geochemical hydrograph separation.

Sr isotopes as a tracer of weathering processes and dust inputs in a tropical granitoid watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

Sr isotope data from soils, water, and atmospheric inputs in a small tropical granitoid watershed in the Luquillo Mountains
of Puerto Rico constrain soil mineral development, weathering fluxes, and atmospheric deposition. This study provides
new information on pedogenic processes and geochemical fluxes that is not apparent in watershed mass balances based on
major elements alone. 87Sr/86Sr data reveal that Saharan mineral aerosol dust contributes significantly to atmospheric inputs.

Contributions of dust to phosphorus cycling in tropical forests of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

Pett-Ridge, Julie C. 2009. Contributions of dust to phosphorus cycling in tropical forests of the luquillo mountains, puerto rico. Biogeochemistry 94 (1) (MAY): 63-80.

Abstract: 
The input of phosphorus (P) through mineral aerosol dust deposition may be an important component of nutrient dynamics in tropical forest ecosystems. A new dust deposition calculation is used to construct a broad analysis of the importance of dust-derived P to the P budget of a montane wet tropical forest in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. The dust deposition calculation used here takes advantage of an internal geochemical signal (Sr isotope mass balance) to provide a spatially integrated longer-term average dust deposition flux. Dust inputs of P (0.23 ± 0.08 kg ha-1 year-1) are compared with watershed-average inputs of P to the soil through the conversion of underlying saprolite into soil (between 0.07 and 0.19 kg ha-1 year-1), and with watershed-average losses of soil P through leaching (between 0.02 and 0.14 kg ha-1 year-1) and erosion (between 0.04 and 1.38 kg ha-1 year-1). The similar magnitude of dust-derived P inputs to that of other fluxes indicates that dust is an important component of the soil and biomass P budget in this ecosystem. Dust-derived inputs of P alone are capable of completely replacing the total soil and biomass P pool on a timescale of between 2.8 ka and 7.0 ka, less than both the average soil residence time (*15 ka) and the average landslide recurrence interval (*10 ka).

Ca/Sr and 87Sr/86Sr ratios as tracers of Ca and Sr cycling in the Rio Icacos watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

Pett-Ridge, Julie C., Louis A. Derry, and Jenna K. Barrows. 2009. Ca/Sr and (87)sr/(86)sr ratios as tracers of ca and sr cycling in the rio icacos watershed, luquillo mountains, puerto rico. Chemical Geology 267 (1-2) (SEP 15): 32-45.

Abstract: 
We investigated Ca and Sr cycling in a humid tropical forest by analyzing Ca/Sr ratios and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in soil minerals, soil exchangeable cations, soil porewater, and plant roots, wood and leaves, and calculating the relative contributions of Sr from atmospheric inputs and weathering of local bedrock. An unexpectedly large contribution of bedrock-derived Sr and presumably Ca is cycled through the vegetation, reflecting the important role of geological processes in controlling the cycling of base cation nutrients even in a system with intensely weathered soil. This is surprising because over 99% of the Ca and Sr that was originally in the bedrock is leached out of the soil and saprolite during early stages of weathering at this site, and because there are large atmospheric inputs to the site of both sea salt and Saharan dust. Substantial differences in Ca and Sr cycling are seen on small spatial scales between a ridgetop and an adjacent steep hillslope site. Measured Ca/Sr ratios reflect fractionation between these elements during biogeochemical cycling. Fractionation was particularly evident between wood and foliar tissue, but fractionation during soil exchange processes is also likely. In comparing the Ca/Sr ratios of plants, exchangeable cations, and bulk soils, we found that foliar Ca/Sr ratios were greater than exchangeable cation Ca/Sr ratios, which in turn were greater than soil Ca/Sr ratios, similar to patterns observed at other highly weathered tropical sites.

Sr isotopes as a tracer of weathering processes and dust inputs in a tropical granitoid watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

Pett-Ridge J. C., Derry L. A. and Kurtz A. C. (2009) Sr isotopes as
a tracer of weathering processes and dust inputs in a tropical
granitoid watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. Geochim.
Cosmochim. Acta 73, 25–43.

Abstract: 
Sr isotope data from soils, water, and atmospheric inputs in a small tropical granitoid watershed in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico constrain soil mineral development, weathering fluxes, and atmospheric deposition. This study provides new information on pedogenic processes and geochemical fluxes that is not apparent in watershed mass balances based on major elements alone. 87Sr/86Sr data reveal that Saharan mineral aerosol dust contributes significantly to atmospheric inputs. Watershed-scale Sr isotope mass balance calculations indicate that the dust deposition flux for the watershed is 2100 ± 700 mg cm2 ka1. Nd isotope analyses of soil and saprolite samples provide independent evidence for the presence of Saharan dust in the regolith. Watershed-scale Sr isotope mass balance calculations are used to calculate the overall short-term chemical denudation velocity for the watershed, which agrees well with previous denudation rate estimates based on major element chemistry and cosmogenic nuclides. The dissolved streamwater Sr flux is dominated by weathering of plagioclase and hornblende and partial weathering of biotite in the saprock zone. A steep gradient in regolith porewater 87Sr/86Sr ratio with depth, from 0.70635 to as high as 0.71395, reflects the transition from primary mineral-derived Sr to a combination of residual biotite-derived Sr and atmospherically-derived Sr near the surface, and allows multiple origins of kaolinite to be identified

Ca/Sr and 87Sr/86Sr ratios as tracers of Ca and Sr cycling in the Rio Icacos watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

Julie C. Pett-Ridge, Louis A. Derry, Jenna K. Barrows
Ca/Sr and 87Sr/86Sr ratios as tracers of Ca and Sr cycling in the Rio Icacos watershed, Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico
Chemical Geology (2009)
Volume: 267, Issue: 1-2, Publisher: Elsevier B.V., Pages: 32-45

Abstract: 
We investigated Ca and Sr cycling in a humid tropical forest by analyzing Ca/Sr ratios and 87Sr/86Sr ratios in soil minerals, soil exchangeable cations, soil porewater, and plant roots, wood and leaves, and calculating the relative contributions of Sr from atmospheric inputs and weathering of local bedrock. An unexpectedly large contribution of bedrock-derived Sr and presumably Ca is cycled through the vegetation, re!ecting the important role of geological processes in controlling the cycling of base cation nutrients even in a system with intensely weathered soil. This is surprising because over 99% of the Ca and Sr that was originally in the bedrock is leached out of the soil and saprolite during early stages of weathering at this site, and because there are large atmospheric inputs to the site of both sea salt and Saharan dust. Substantial differences in Ca and Sr cycling are seen on small spatial scales between a ridgetop and an adjacent steep hillslope site. Measured Ca/Sr ratios re!ect fractionation between these elements during biogeochemical cycling. Fractionation was particularly evident between wood and foliar tissue, but fractionation during soil exchange processes is also likely. In comparing the Ca/Sr ratios of plants, exchangeable cations, and bulk soils, we found that foliar Ca/Sr ratios were greater than exchangeable cation Ca/Sr ratios, which in turn were greater than soil Ca/Sr ratios, similar to patterns observed at other highly weathered tropical sites.

Contributions of dust to phosphorus cycling in tropical forests of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

Pett-Ridge, J. C. 2009. Contributions of dust to phosphorus
cycling in tropical forests of the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto
Rico. Biogeochemistry 94:63-80.

Abstract: 
The input of phosphorus (P) through mineral aerosol dust deposition may be an important component of nutrient dynamics in tropical forest ecosystems. A new dust deposition calculation is used to construct a broad analysis of the importance of dust-derived P to the P budget of a montane wet tropical forest in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. The dust deposition calculation used here takes advantage of an internal geochemical signal (Sr isotope mass balance) to provide a spatially integrated longer-term average dust deposition flux. Dust inputs of P (0.23 ± 0.08 kg ha-1 year-1) are compared with watershed-average inputs of P to the soil through the conversion of underlying saprolite into soil (between 0.07 and 0.19 kg ha-1 year-1), and with watershed-average losses of soil P through leaching (between 0.02 and 0.14 kg ha-1 year-1) and erosion (between 0.04 and 1.38 kg ha-1 year-1). The similar magnitude of dust-derived P inputs to that of other fluxes indicates that dust is an important component of the soil and biomass P budget in this ecosystem. Dust-derived inputs of P alone are capable of completely replacing the total soil and biomass P pool on a timescale of between 2.8 ka and 7.0 ka, less than both the average soil residence time (*15 ka) and the average landslide recurrence interval (*10 ka).
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