Anolis lizards

behavioral thermoregulation in lizards: importance of associated costs

Raymond B. Huey
Behavioral Thermoregulation in Lizards: Importance of Associated Costs
Science 31 May 1974:
Vol. 184 no. 4140 pp. 1001-1003
DOI: 10.1126/science.184.4140.1001

Abstract: 
The Puerto Rican lizard Anolis cristatellus behaviorally regulates body temperature in an open habitat but passively tolerates lower and more variable temperatures in an adjacent forest where basking sites are few and distant. Thermoregulation may be adaptive only when costs resulting from associated losses of time and energy are low.

Thermal Biology of Anolis Lizards in a Complex Fauna: The Christatellus Group on Puerto Rico

Thermal Biology of Anolis Lizards in a Complex Fauna: The Christatellus Group on Puerto Rico
Raymond B. Huey and T. Preston Webster
Ecology
Vol. 57, No. 5 (Late Summer, 1976), pp. 985-994

Abstract: 
To describe the thermal biology of the three trunk-ground species of the Anolis cristatellus group on Puerto Rico, an island with 10 species of Anolis, we obtained samples of air and body temperatures of A. gundlachi (shady perches, montane forests), A. cristatellus (shady or sunny perches in open or closed forests, lowlands to mid-elevations), and A. cooki (sunny perches in open, xeric lowlands). Average body temperatures parallel altitudinal and habitat association (lowest for A gundlachi, highest for A. cooki). Within a species, body temperatures are strongly correlated with air temperatures and thus vary with altitude, time of day, habitat, and weather. Observed differences between sympatric species in body temperatures and habitat probably reflect physiological requirements, but may be magnified by competition. Relative thermal niche breadth of individuals of these species is approximated and compared with data on species from simple anole faunas to evaluate hypotheses on the evaluation of thermal niche breadth. Extent of basking behavior is inversely related to associated costs for these species. In closed forests where costs of raising body temperatures are high, A. gundlachi and A. cristatellus rarely bask and seemingly are routinely passive to ambient conditions. In open habitats where costs are low, A. cristatellus and A. cooki frequently bask.

Experimental Removal of Insectivores from Rain Forest Canopy: Direct and Indirect Effects

Dial, Roman, and Jonathan Roughgarden. 1995. Experimental Removal of Insectivores from Rain Forest Canopy: Direct and Indirect Effects. Ecology 76:1821–1834

Abstract: 
This study considered the effects of insectivorous Anolis lizards on a large, complex food web of arthropods and associated herbivory in a tropical rain forest canopy. We excluded Anolis lizards for 6 mo from 20—30 m high tree crowns in Puerto Rican rain forest. Simultaneous with lizard exclusion, we sampled orb spiders, airborne arthropods, and leaf arthropods in lizard removal crowns and in controls. We also sampled herbivory at the end of the experiment. Lizard removal had strong, statistically significant, positive effects on arthropods >2 mm in length and weak negative effects on arthropods <2 mm. Parameters of arthropod body size distributions differed between removals and controls for leaf arthropods, but not for airborne arthropods. Among arthropod taxa >2 mm, both predatory, i.e., orb spiders and parasitic Hymenoptera, and nonpredatory forms, i.e. Diptera, Coleoptera, Orthoptera, and Blattaria, showed strong significant and positive responses to lizard removal. Large Psocoptera, Homoptera, leaf spiders, and ants did not show significant overall responses to lizard removal. Frequency of herbivore damage on new leaves was positively correlated with abundance of Orthoptera and Blattaria. This damage was significantly greater in lizard removal crowns than in controls, indicating an indirect effect of anoles on plants. The indirect effect of lizards on small arthropods through the predatory anthropod pathway appeared weak. Results of lizard removal shown by this study corroborate other lizard removal studies from more xeric, ground—level habitats with simpler food webs in the West Indies, particularly with respect to orb spiders and herbivory. Taken together with the results of similar experiments performed in trophically less complex systems, this experiment suggests that food web size is less important than body size in determining interaction strength between community members.
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