Caribbean National Forest

EXOTIC EARTHWORMS ACCELERATE PLANT LITTER DECOMPOSITION IN A PUERTO RICAN PASTURE AND A WET FOREST

Exotic Earthworms Accelerate Plant Litter Decomposition in a Puerto Rican Pasture and a Wet Forest
Z. G. Liu and X. M. Zou
Ecological Applications
Vol. 12, No. 5 (Oct., 2002), pp. 1406-1417

Abstract: 
Tropical land-use changes can have profound influence on earthworms that play important roles in regulating soil processes. Converting tropical forests to pastures often drastically increases the abundance of exotic earthworm populations such as Pontoscolex corethrurus. We initiated this study to examine the influence of exotic earthworms on the decomposition of plant leaves and roots in a tropical pasture and a wet forest of Puerto Rico. We employed two treatments: control with natural earthworm population, and earthworm reduction using an electroshocking technique. Decomposition rates of plant leaves on the ground surface and root materials within the surface mineral soil were estimated using a litterbag technique. To understand the role that exotic earthworms play in altering plant litter decomposition, we also compared soil CO2 evolution rates, soil microbial biomass, and physical and chemical soil properties between the controls and earthwormreduced plots during a one-year period. Earthworm populations in the electroshocked enclosures were reduced by 85% and 87% as compared with pasture and forest controls by the end of the experiment. Earthworm reduction significantly decreased the annual decay rates of plant leaves but had no effects on those of plant roots in both pasture and forest sites. Although the control plots had less mass remaining on every litterbag collecting date, significant treatment effects on leaf decomposition occurred only after 240 d in both sites. The decay rates were greater when organic materials had low carbon to nitrogen or phosphorus ratios. Soil respiration was also decreased in the earthworm-reduced plots. In contrast, soil microbial biomass C was not affected by earthworm reduction. Furthermore, there were no significant differences between the two treatments in soil bulk density, moisture content, pH, or temperature at either site. Our results suggest that exotic earthworms may accelerate leaf litter decomposition by elevating rates of litter consumption/digestion or microbial activity, rather than by improving soil physical/chemical conditions or altering microbial biomass.

An EMERGY Evaluation of Puerto Rico and the Luquillo Experimental Forest

Scatena, F.N.; Doherty, S.J.; Odum, H.T.; Kharecha, P. 2002. An EMERGY
evaluation of Puerto Rico and the Luquillo Experimental Forest. Gen. Tech. Rep.
IITF-GTR-9. Río Piedras, PR: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service,
International Institute of Tropical Forestry. 79 p.

Abstract: 
The many functions of Puerto Rico and the Luquillo Experimental Forest (the Forest) were evaluated in units of solar EMERGY, an energy-based measure of resource contribution and influence, defined as the energy of one type required to produce a flow or storage of another type. Rainfall and tectonic uplift are the largest environmental inputs into the Forest. The interaction of these inputs results in an erosional landscape where the EMERGY of biological processes is less than the EMERGY associated with the physical and chemical sculpturing of the landscape. The environmental work that built the natural capital of these forests is 9 to 50 times their current dollar market values. Of the investments evaluated in this study, the effects associated with water extraction are the largest. Tectonic inputs and the hydrologic cycle also provide most of the environmental EMERGY flows in the island of Puerto Rico. The ratio of societal inputs to environmental inputs, however, is 45 for Puerto Rico and 3.5 for the Forest. Per capita EMERGY- use is typical of moderately developed economies, but the island has one of the most investment-intensive, least self-sufficient economies known and an EMERGY signature that resembles a city-state.

Water Withdrawn From the Luquillo Experimental Forest, 2004

Crook, Kelly E.; Scatena, Fred N.; Pringle, Catherine M. 2007. Water Withdrawn From the Luquillo Experimental Forest, 2004. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry. Gen. Tech. Rep. IITF-GTR-34.

Abstract: 
This study quantifies the amount of water withdrawn from the Luqillo Experimental Forest (LEF) in 2004. Spatially averaged mean monthly water budgets were generated for watersheds draining the LEF by combining long-term data from various government agencies with estimated extraction data. Results suggest that, on a typical day, 70 percent of water generated within the forest is diverted before reaching the ocean. This is up from an estimated 54 percent in 1994. Analysis showed that up to 63 percent of average monthly stream runoff is diverted from individual watersheds during drier months. Watersheds with large water intakes have the most dramatic decrease in streamflow, particularly the Río Espiritu Santo watershed, where 82 percent of median flow is diverted.
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