nutrient export

Long-term dynamics of organic matter and elements exported as coarse particulates from two Caribbean montane watersheds

Heartsill Scalley, T., Scatena, F.N., Moya S., Lugo A.E., 2012 Long-term dynamics of organic matter and elements exported as coarse particulates from two Caribbean montane watersheds. Journal of Tropical Ecology. Vol 28. pp 127-139. doi:10.1017/S0266467411000733

Effects of Hurricane Disturbance on Stream Water Concentrations and Fluxes in Eight Tropical Forest Watersheds of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

SCHAEFER, DOUGLAS. A.; McDOWELL, WILLIAM H.; SCATENA, FREDRICK N.; ASBURY,CLYDE E. 2000. Effects of hurricane disturbance on stream water concentrations and fluxes in eight tropical forest watersheds of the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. . Journal of Tropical Ecology 16:189-207

Abstract: 
Stream water chemistry responds substantially to watershed disturbances, but hurricane effects have not been extensively investigated in tropical regions. This study presents a long-term (2.5-1 1 y) weekly record of stream water chemistry on eight forested watersheds (catchment basins) in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico. This includes a period before and at least 2 y after the disturbance caused by the 1989 Hurricane Hugo. Nitrate, potassium and ammonium concentrations increased after the hurricane and remained elevated for up to 2 y. Sulphate, chloride, sodium, magnesium and calcium showed smaller relative significant changes. Average stream water exports of potassium, nitrate and ammonium increased by 13.1, 3.6 and 0.54 kg ha-' y-' in the first post-hurricane year across all watersheds. These represent increases of 119, 182 and 102% respectively, compared to the other years of record. The increased stream outputs of potassium and nitrogen in the first 2 y post-hurricane are equivalent to 3% (potassium) and 1% (nitrogen) of the hurricanederived plant litter. Effects of hurricanes on tropical stream water potassium and nitrogen can be greater than those caused by canopy gaps or limited forest cutting, but less than those following large-scale deforestation or fire.

Control of Nitrogen Export from Watersheds by Headwater Streams

Peterson, B.J. et al. 2001. Control of Nitrogen Export from Watersheds by Headwater Streams.
Science 6 April 2001:
Vol. 292 no. 5514 pp. 86-90
DOI: 10.1126/science.1056874

Abstract: 
A comparative 15N-tracer study of nitrogen dynamics in headwater streams from biomes throughout North America demonstrates that streams exert control over nutrient exports to rivers, lakes, and estuaries. The most rapid uptake and transformation of inorganic nitrogen occurred in the smallest streams. Ammonium entering these streams was removed from the water within a few tens to hundreds of meters. Nitrate was also removed from stream water but traveled a distance 5 to 10 times as long, on average, as ammonium. Despite low ammonium concentration in stream water, nitrification rates were high, indicating that small streams are potentially important sources of atmospheric nitrous oxide. During seasons of high biological activity, the reaches of headwater streams typically export downstream less than half of the input of dissolved inorganic nitrogen from their watersheds.
Syndicate content