rainfall

Linking habitat stability to floods and droughts: effects on shrimp in montane streams, Puerto Rico

Covich A.P., Crowl T.A. & Scatena F.N. (2000) Linking
habitat stability to floods and droughts: effects on
shrimp in montane streams, Puerto Rico. Verhandlungen
der Internationalen Vereinigung fu¨r Theoretische und
Angewandte Limnologie, 27, 2430–2434.

Abstract: 
Most previous studies on Caribbean flood and drought frequency have examined hydrological (e.g. MORRIS & VAZQUEZ 1990, GARCIA et al. 1996) rather than ecological effects (COVICH et al. 1998). We analyzed temporal and spatial distributions of rainfall, stream flow, and mean maximum pool depth over an 8-year period (1990–1997) to evaluate effects of variable flows. We examined the response of a biotic variable (the coefficient of variation in shrimp densities) to changes in water depth (coefficient of variation of maximum pool depth) along an elevational gradient.

SLOPEWASH, SURFACE RUNOFF AND FINE-LITTER TRANSPORT IN FOREST AND LANDSLIDE SCARS IN HUMID- TROPICAL STEEPLANDS, LUQUILLO EXPERIMENTAL FOREST, PUERTO RICO

Larsen, M.C., Torres-Sánchez, A.J., and Concepción, I.M., 1998, Slopewash, surface runoff, and fine-litter transport in forest and landslide scars in humid-tropical steeplands, Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico [abs] EOS, Transactions American Geophysical Union, vol. 80.

Abstract: 
Slopewash, surface runoff, and fine-litter transport in forest and landslide scars in humid-tropical steeplands, Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico Rainfall, slopewash (the erosion of soil particles), surface runoff, and fine-litter transport at humid-tropical steepland sites in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico (18° 20' N, 65° 45' W) were measured from 1991 to 1995. Hillslopes underlain by: 1) Cretaceous tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone in subtropical rain (tabonuco) forest with vegetation recovering from Hurricane Hugo (1989); and underlain by 2) Tertiary quartz diorite in subtropical lower montane wet (colorado and dwarf) forest with undisturbed forest canopy were compared to recent landslide scars. Monthly surface runoff on these very steep hillslopes (24° to 43°) was only 0.2 to 0.5 percent of monthly rainfall. Slopewash was higher in sandy loam soils whose parent material is quartz diorite (averaging 46 g m-2 a-1) than in silty-clay loam soils derived from tuffaceous sandstone and siltstone where the average was 9 g m-2 a-1. Annual slopewash of 100 to 349 g m-2 on the surfaces of two recent, small landslide scars was measured initially but slopewash decreased to only 3 to 4 g m-2 a-1 by the end of the study. The mean annual mass of fine litter (mainly leaves and twigs) transported downslope at the forested sites ranged from 5 to 8 g m-2 and was lower at the tabonuco forest site, where post-Hurricane Hugo recovery is still in progress. Mean annual fine-litter transport was 2.5 g m-2 on the two landslide scars.

Disturbance and long-term patterns of rainfall and throughfall nutrient fluxes in a subtropical wet forest in Puerto Rico

Heartsill-Scalley, T.; Scatena,F.N.; Estrada,C.; McDowell,W.H.;Lugo,A.E. 2007. Disturbance and long-term patterns of rainfall and throughfall nutrient fluxes in a subtropical wet forest in Puerto Rico. Journal of Hydrology 333, :472- 485.

Abstract: 
Nutrient fluxes in rainfall and throughfall were measured weekly in a mature subtropical wet forest in NE Puerto Rico over a 15-year period that included the effects of 10 named tropical storms, several prolonged dry periods, and volcanic activity in the region. Mean annual rainfall and throughfall were 3482 and 2131 mm yr1, respectively. Average annual rainfall and throughfall fluxes of K, Ca, Mg, Cl, Na, and SO4–S were similar but somewhat larger than those reported for most tropical forests. Rainfall inputs of nitrogen were comparatively low and reflect the relative isolation of the airshed. More constituents had seasonal differences in rainfall fluxes (6 out of 12) than throughfall fluxes (4 out of 12) and all volume weighted throughfall enrichment ratios calculated for the 15-year period were greater than one. However, median weekly enrichment ratios were less than 1 for sea salts and dissolved organic carbon, between 1 and 2 for Mg, Ca, SiO2 and SO4–S, and greater than 10 for NH4–N, PO4–P, and K. Droughts tended to reduce enrichment ratios of cations and sea-salts, but increased enrichment ratios of NH4–N, PO4–P, and K. In the weeks following hurricanes and tropical storms, relative throughfall tended to be higher and enrichment ratios tended to be lower. Saharan dust and the activity of Caribbean volcanoes can also be detected in the time series. Nevertheless, the impacts of particular events are variable and modified by the magnitude of the event, the preand post-event rainfall, and the time since the previous event. Rainfall, throughfall, rainfall pH, and rainfall fluxes of seven constituents had decreasing trends over the 15-year period. However, these decreases were small, less than inter-annual and annual varia-tions, and not considered to be ecologically significant. These long-term observations indicate that physical and biological processes associated with water passing through the canopy act to buffer internal nutrient cycles from inter-annual and seasonal variations in rainfall inputs.

Rainfall, Runoff and Elevation Relationships in the Luquillo Mountains of Puerto Rico

Garcia, A.R. Warner, G.S. Scatena, F. and Civco, D.L. 2002. Bisley Rainfall and
Throughfall Rainfall, Runoff and Elevation Relationships in the Luquillo
mountains of Puerto Rico. Caribbean Journal of Science. 2002 (In press).
152
Published as Scientific Contribution No. 1642 of the Storrs Agricultural
Experiment Station.

Abstract: 
Long-terrn rainfall and discharge data from the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) were analysed to develop relationships between rainfall, stream-runoff and elevation. These relationships were then used with a Geographic Information System (GIS) to determine spatially-averaged, mean annual hydrologic budgets for watersheds and forest types within the study area. A significant relationship exists between 1) elevation and mean annual rainfall; 2) elevation and the average number of days per year without rainfall; 3) annual stream runoff and the weighted mean elevation of a watershed; and 4) annual stream runoff and the elevation of the gaging station. A comparison of rainfall patterns between a high and a low elevation station indicated that annual and seasonal variations in rainfall are similiar along the elevational gradient. However, the upper elevation station had greater annual mean rainfall (4436 mm/yr compared to 3524 mn/yr) while the lower station had a greater variation in daily, monthly, and annual totals. Model estimates indicate that a total of 3864 mm/yr (444 hm3) of rainfall falls on the forest in an average year. The Tabonuco, Colorado, Palm, and Dwarf forest types receive an estimated annual rainfall of 3537, 4191, 4167, and 4849 mm/yr, respectively. Of the average annual rainfall input, 65% (2526 mm/yr) is converted to runoff and the remainding 35% (1338 mm/yr) is lost from the system by evapotranspiration and other abstractions. In comparsion to other tropical forests, the LEF as a whole has more evapotranspiration than many tropical montane forests but less than many lowland tropical forests.
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