A record of recent change in terrestrial sedimentation in a coral-reef environment, La Parguera, Puerto Rico: A response to coastal development?

Ryan, K. E., J. P. Walsh, D. R. Corbett, and A. Winter. 2008. A record of recent change in terrestrial sedimentation in a coral-reef environment, la parguera, puerto rico: A response to coastal development? Marine Pollution Bulletin 56 (6) (JUN): 1177-83.

Increased sediment flux to the coastal ocean due to coastal development is considered a major threat to the viability of coral reefs. A change in the nature of sediment supply and storage has been identified in a variety of coastal settings, particularly in response to European colonization, but sedimentation around reefs has received less attention. This research examines the sedimentary record adjacent to a coastal village that has experienced considerable land-use change over the last few decades. Sediment cores were analyzed to characterize composition and sediment accumulation rates. Sedimentation rates decreased seaward across the shelf from 0.85 cm y1 in a nearshore bay to 0.19 cm y1 in a fore-reef setting. Data reflected a significant (up to 2) increase over the last 80 years in terrestrial sediment accumulating in the back-reef setting, suggesting greater terrestrial sediment flux to the area. Reef health has declined, and increased turbidity is believed to be an important impact, particularly when combined with additional stressors.

Water, Sediment, and Nutrient Discharge Characteristics of Rivers in Puerto Rico, andtheir Potential Influence on Coral Reefs

Warne, A.G., Webb, R.M.T., and Larsen, M.C., 2005, Water, Sediment, and Nutrient Discharge Characteristics of Rivers in Puerto Rico, and their Potential Influence on Coral Reefs: U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report
2005-5206, 58 p.

Data from 29 streamflow-gaging stations, including 9 stations with daily suspended-sediment concentration, and data from 24 water-quality stations were compiled and analyzed to investigate the potential effects of river sediment and nutrient discharges on the coral reefs of Puerto Rico. The largely mountainous watersheds of the 8,711-square-kilometer island of Puerto Rico are small, channel gradients are steep, stream valleys tend to be well-incised and narrow, and major storms tend to be intense but brief; hence flooding is rapid with peak discharges several orders of magnitude above base discharge, and flood waters recede quickly. Storm runoff transports a substantial part of fluvial suspended sediment from uplands to the coast, as indicated by sediment data from a set of nine streamflow-gaging stations representative of runoff from watersheds considered typical of conditions in Puerto Rico. For example, the highest recorded daily sediment discharge is 1 to 3.6 times the annual suspended-sediment discharge, and runoff from major storms induces sediment transport 1 to 32 times the median annual sediment load. Precipitation associated with Hurricane Georges in September 1998 is estimated to have averaged 300 millimeters across the island, which is equivalent to a volume of about 2.6 billion cubic meters. Analysis of runoff and sediment yield from Hurricane Georges indicates that more than 1.0 billion cubic meters of water and at least 2.4 million metric tonnes of sediment (and as much as 5 to 10 million metric tonnes), were discharged to the coast and shelf as a result of this major storm. Because of their relatively small size, dams and reservoirs of Puerto Rico have relatively little effect on total discharge of water and sediment to the coastal marine waters during major storms. The presence of reservoirs, however, may be detrimental to coral reefs for two reasons: (1) coarse sediments deposited in the reservoir can be replaced by finer sediments scoured, if available, from the river channels and flood plains below the dam; and (2) the loads of phosphorus and ammonia reaching the coastal waters may increase as organic matter decomposes in the anoxic bottom waters of the reservoir. Rainfall, water discharge, sediment discharge, and sediment yield vary across the island. Mean annual runoff for the island is estimated to be 910 millimeters, about 57 percent of mean annual precipitation (1,600 millimeters). Mean annual suspended-sediment discharge from Puerto Rico into surrounding coastal waters is estimated to range from 2.7 to 9.0 million metric tonnes. Hydrologic and sediment data associated with Hurricane Georges indicate that sediment yield is generally proportional to the depth of storm runoff. Discharge and sediment-concentration data indicate that during this storm, river water and sediment that discharged into the marine environment generally formed hypopycnal plumes (buoyant suspension layers). Generally, hyperpycnal (density) plumes can develop in areas with high discharges and sediment concentrations. Both hypopycnal and hyperpycnal plumes distribute suspended sediment over broad areas of the Puerto Rico shelf and shelf slope. Comparison of long-term suspended-sediment discharge and watershed characteristics for Puerto Rico with those of other river systems around the world indicates that Puerto Rico rivers are similar to temperate and tropical upland river systems.

the role of omnivory in a neotropical stream: separating diurnal and nocturnal effects

The Role of Omnivory in a Neotropical Stream: Separating Diurnal and Nocturnal Effects
Catherine M. Pringle and Toshihide Hamazaki
Vol. 79, No. 1 (Jan., 1998), pp. 269-280

The role of omnivory in structuring communities is potentially great in lowland neotropical streams that are characterized by an abundance of macroconsumers that consume both insects and algae. Here, we separate effects of natural densities of diurnal fishes and nocturnal shrimps in structuring the benthic community of a stream draining Costa Rica's Atlantic slope. We experimentally manipulated the spatial and temporal access of fishes and shrimps to benthic resources, in situ, using electric "fences" powered by solar-powered fence chargers. Both fishes and shrimps significantly reduced inorganic sediment mass, organic ashfree dry mass (AFDM), densities of larval Chironomidae, and total insects: their combined effects were greater than effects of either group alone, and there was no significant interaction. Fishes shifted algal community composition from diatoms to green and blue-green algae and benthic insect communities towards chironomids, while shrimps had no significant effect on community composition. Effects of fishes were generally greater than those of shrimps, and this is due, in part, to higher natural densities and foraging pressures of fishes. Furthermore, shrimps foraged for significantly longer periods of time in the treatment where fishes were excluded than in the combined fish and shrimp access treatment, suggesting that diurnally feeding fishes are strong "interactors," mediating resource availability to nocturnally feeding shrimps. Natural erosion and sediment-mediated effects of macroconsumers (both direct and indirect) also affected algal communities: a manual sediment removal experiment resulted in significant reductions of diatom biovolume and increases in the filament length of green and blue-green algae. Our results show the importance of: (1) assessing macroconsumer effects in a relatively natural depositional environment subject to background erosion and sloughing (i.e., in this case by using electric exclosures); (2) evaluating effects of natural densities of both diurnal and nocturnal macroconsumers through time in the context of these abiotic effects; and (3) distinguishing between the response of different types of algal resources (e.g., diatoms vs. green and blue-green algae), which are differentially affected by sedimentation and erosion. Cage experiments, short-term observations, or one-time sampling of undifferentiated "algae" may artificially overestimate trophic effects and underestimate abiotic effects. We found no evidence of a trophic cascade. Our findings are in agreement with the theoretical prediction that large-sized omnivores have strong direct trophic (feeding) effects, both on smaller primary consumers (insects) and basal resources (algae).

Effects of land use change on northeastern Puerto Rican rivers

Clark, J. 1997. Effects of land use change on northeastern
Puerto Rican rivers. Phd Dissertation, Johns
Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, 187

The 500 year period considered in this study is sufficiently long that river change may be produced by natural changes in the external controls of river geometry. These controls include changes in the base level and changes in the climate which, like land use, change the supply of sediment to the rivers.

Drinking Water from Forests and Grasslands: A Synthesis of the Scientific Literature

Dissmeyer, George E.; [Editor] 2000. Drinking water from forests and grasslands: a synthesis of the scientific literature. Gen. Tech. Rep. SRS-39. Asheville, NC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Research Station. 246 p

This report reviews the scientific literature about the potential of common forest and grassland management to introduce contaminants of concern to human health into public drinking water sources.Effects of managing water, urbanization, ecreation, roads, timber, fire, pesticides, grazing, wildlife and fish habitat, and mineral, oil, and gas resources on public drinking water source quality are reviewed.Gaps in knowledge and research needs are indicated. Managers of national forests and grasslands and similar lands in other ownerships,environmental regulators,and citizens interested in drinking water may use this report for assessing contamination risks associated with land uses.

Morphology and sedimentation in the Caribbean montane streams: examples from Jamaica and Puerto Rico

Ahmad R, Scatena FN, Gupta A. 1993. Morphology and sedimentation in Caribbean montane streams: examples from Jamaica and Puerto Rico. Sedimentary Geology 85: 157–169.

This paper presents a summary description of the morphology, sedimentation, and behaviour of the montane streams of eastern Jamaica and eastern Puerto Rico. The area is located within a 200 km wide seismically active zone of Neogene left-lateral strike-slip deformation which defines the plate boundary between the Caribbean and North American Plates. Tropical storms, occasionally strengthening up to hurricane force, affect the region periodically. This is an area of steep, mass-movement-scarred hillslopes which supply a large amount of coarse sediment to the rivers. From the description presented, we have constructed a model for the rivers of this region controlled by both neotectonics and periodic large floods. The drainage density is low with a near-rectangular stream network. The gradients are steep with boulder accumulations in the channels, their location at times related to the presence of large past landslides on hillslopes. Narrow, steep and confined channels occur in the mountains, but in wider sections and lower down near coastal plains, flood depositional forms appear in coarse valley alluvium. Small-scale deviations from the general pattern occur locally, controlled by variations in lithology, neotectonism, seasonality in flow, etc. This model for Caribbean montane streams differs considerably from the standard descriptions of alluvial rivers for which a number of detailed studies are available.
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