soil nitrogen

Soil factors predict initial plant colonization on Puerto Rican landslides

Shiels, A.B., West, C.A., Weiss, L., Klawinski, P.D. &
Walker, L.R. 2008. Soil factors predict initial plant
colonization on Puerto Rican landslides. Plant
Ecology 195: 165–178.

Abstract: 
Tropical storms are the principal cause of landslides in montane rainforests, such as the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) of Puerto Rico. A storm in 2003 caused 30 new landslides in the LEF that we used to examine prior hypotheses that slope stability and organically enriched soils are prerequisites for plant colonization. We measured slope stability and litterfall 8–13 months following landslide formation. At 13 months we also measured microtopography, soil characteristics (organic matter, particle size, total nitrogen, and water-holding capacity), elevation, distance to forest edge, and canopy cover. When all landslides were analyzed together, plant biomass and cover at 13 months were not correlated with slope stability or organic matter, but instead with soil nitrogen, clay content, waterholding capacity, and elevation. When landslides were analyzed after separating by soil type, the distance from the forest edge and slope stability combined with soil factors (excluding organic matter) predicted initial plant colonization on volcaniclastic landslides, whereas on diorite landslides none of the measured characteristics affected initial plant colonization. The life forms of the colonizing plants reflected these differences in landslide soils, as trees, shrubs, and vines colonized high clay, high nitrogen, and low elevation volcaniclastic soils, whereas herbs were the dominant colonists on high sand, low nitrogen, and high elevation diorite soils. Therefore, the predictability of the initial stage of plant succession on LEF landslides is primarily determined by soil characteristics that are related to soil type.

The Effects of Natural and Human Disturbances on Soil Nitrogen Dynamics and Trace Gas Fluxes in a Puerto Rican Wet Forest

The Effects of Natural and Human Disturbances on Soil Nitrogen Dynamics and Trace Gas Fluxes in a Puerto Rican Wet Forest
P. A. Steudler, J. M. Melillo, R. D. Bowden, M. S. Castro and A. E. Lugo
Biotropica
Vol. 23, No. 4, Part A. Special Issue: Ecosystem, Plant, and Animal Responses to Hurricanes in the Caribbean (Dec., 1991), pp. 356-363

Abstract: 
We examined the effects of two disturbances (Hurricane Hugo and forest clearcutting) on soil nitrogen dynamics and on the exchanges of N20, CO,, and CH, between soils and the atmosphere of a subtropical wet forest in Puerto Rico. The disturbances resulted in prolonged increases in ammonium pools and short-term increases in rates of net N-mineralization and net nitrification. Nitrous oxide emissions increased following both disturbances. The most dramatic increase was observed 4 mo after clearcutting; N 2 0 emissions (109.49 pg N/m2-hr) from the cut plot were about two orders of magnitude higher than emissions from the reference plot (1.71 pg N/m2-hr). Carbon dioxide emissions from both disturbed plots (mean 102.47 mg C/m2-hr) were about 30 percent lower than the reference (mean 15 1.28 mg C/m2-hr). Soils at all sites were generally sinks for CH,. Methane uptake, however, was suppressed by both disturbances. This suppression may be related to disturbance-induced changes in the nitrogen cycle, as we have previously observed in temperate zone forests.
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