tropical montane forest

Lack of Ecotypic Differentiation: Plant Response to Elevation, Population Origin, and Wind in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico

Fetcher, Ned; Cordero, Roberto A.; Voltzow, Janice 2000. Lack of Ecotypic Differentiation: Plant Response to Elevation, Population Origin, and Wind in the Luquillo Mountains, Puerto Rico. BIOTROPICA 32(2) :225-234 .

Abstract: 
How important is ecotypic differentiation along elevational gradients in the tropics? Reciprocal transplants of two shrubs, Clibadium erosum (Asteraceae) and Psychotria berteriana (Rubiaceae), and a palm, Prestoea acuminata var. montana (Palmaceae), were used to test for the effect of environment and population origin on growth and physiology in the Luquillo Experimental Forest of Puerto Rico. Two sites were used, one at Pico del Este (1000 m in cloud forest) and one at El Verde (350 m in lower montane rain forest). At the cloud forest site, plastic barriers were erected around a subset of the plants to examine if protection from wind affected survival or biomass accumulation. Survival of C. erosum and P. berteriana was not affected by site, population origin, or the presence of barriers. For P. acuminata var. montana, survival was higher for plants with barriers, but not affected by site and population origin. Plants of C. erosum and P. berteriana at El Verde grew larger than at Pico del Este, but there was no effect of population origin or barrier treatment on biomass accumulation for these species. For P. acuminata var. montana, there was no effect of environment, population origin, or barrier treatment on biomass accumulation. Light-saturated photosynthetic rate (Amax) of C. erosum, P. berteriana, and P. acuminata var. montana, as well as leaf anatomical characteristics of C. erosum, were unaffected by environment, population origin, and barrier treatment. On balance, there seems to be little evidence of ecotypic differentiation in these species along the gradient.

Variations in Belowground Carbon Storage and Soil CO2 Flux Rates along a Wet Tropical Climate Gradient

McGroddy, Megan; Silver, Whendee L. 2000. Variations in Belowground Carbon Storage and Soil CO2 Flux Rates along a Wet Tropical Climate Gradient. BIOTROPICA 32(4a): 614-624 .

Abstract: 
We used a humid tropical elevation gradient to examine the relationships among climate, edaphic conditions, belowground carbon storage, and soil respiration rates. We also compared open and closed canopy sites to increase the range of microclimate conditions sampled along the gradient, and determine the effects of canopy openings on C and P storage, and C dynamics. Total soil C, the light C fraction, and all of the component fractions of the P pool were significantly related to soil moisture, and all but total soil C were also significantly related to temperature. Both labile and recalcitrant soil P fractions were negatively correlated with the light C fraction, while the dilute HCl-extractable P pool, generally thought of as intermediate in availability, was positively correlated with light C, suggesting that P may play an important role in C cycling within these systems. Total fine root biomass was greatest at 1000 m elevation and lowest at 150 m, and was strongly and positively correlated with soil moisture content. Soil respiration rates were significantly and negatively correlated with fine root biomass and the light C fraction. In forested sites, soil respiration rates were strongly and negatively correlated with total belowground C pools (soils 1 roots 1 forest floor). Belowground C pools did not follow the expected increasing trend with decreases in temperature along the gradient. Our results indicated that in humid tropical forests, the relationships among soil C and nutrient pools, soil respiration rates, and climate are complex. We suggest that frequent and prolonged anaerobic events could be important features of these environments that may explain the observed trends.

Comparison of passive fog gages for determining fog duration and fog interception by a Puerto Rican elfin cloud forest

Holwerda, F.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Scatena, F.N. 2010. Comparison of passive fog gages for determining fog duration and fog interception by a Puerto Rican elfin cloud forest. Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Scatena, F.N.; Hamilton, L.S., eds. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests: Science for Conservation and Management. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 275-281.

Abstract: 
Rates and amounts of fog interception by vegetation depend on wind speed, fog liquid water 4 content (LWC) and duration, as well as surface area and geometry of the vegetation 5 (Schemenauer, 1986). Information on the timing and duration of fog can be obtained with 6 passive fog gages, provided these are protected from rainfall and equipped with a recording 7 device (Bruijnzeel et al., 2005). Fog LWC may also be evaluated from collections by passive 8 gages when information on their collection efficiency and prevailing wind speeds is available 9 (e.g. Schemenauer and Joe, 1989). A variety of passive gages is available, and there has been 10 some discussion as to what is the most suitable type of gage to characterize local fog 11 conditions (Juvik and Nullet, 1995a; Schemenauer and Cereceda, 1995; cf. Delay and 12 Giambelluca, in press; Frumau et al., this issue). For example, a cylindrical gage is considered 13 superior to a flat screen, because it has uniform exposure to all wind directions (Juvik and 14 Nullet, 1995a; cf. García Santos and Bruijnzeel, this issue; Giambelluca et al., this issue). On 15 the other hand, a flat screen generally has a much larger collection area than a cylindrical 16 gage, and may thus measure fog when LWC or wind speeds are low (Schemenauer and 17 Cereceda, 1995).

Decay rate and substrate quality of fine roots and foliage of two tropical tree species in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico

Bloomfield, J., K. A. Vogt, and D. J. Vogt. 1993. Decay rate and substrate quality of fine roots and foliage of two tropical tree species in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. Plant and Soil 150:233-245.

Abstract: 
Decomposition rates, initial chemical composition, and the relationship between initial chemistry and mass loss of fine roots and foliage were determined for two woody tropical species, Prestoea montana and Dacryodes excelsa, over a gradient of sites in two watersheds in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico. At all locations, fine roots decayed significantly more slowly than foliage during the initial 6 months. Substrate quality of the initial tissue showed marked differences between roots and foliage when using cell wall chemistry, secondary chemistry and total elemental analysis as indices. Quantity of acid detergent fiber (ADF) (non-digestible cell wall fiber) and lignin content were higher for roots than leaves: D. excelsa roots had 55.3% ADF and 28.7% lignin while leaves had 36.2% ADF and 11.8% lignin; P. montana roots had 68.0% ADF and 26.8% lignin while leaves had 48.5% ADF and 16.1% lignin. Aluminum concentrations were higher in fine roots (843 mg kg -x in D. excelsa, 1500 mg kg -x in P. montana) than leaves (244mg kg -x in D. excelsa, 422mgkg -1 in P. montana), while calcium concentrations were higher in foliage (5.5 mg g-1 in D. excelsa, 7.8 mg g-X in P. montana) than roots (3.4mgg -1 in D. excelsa, 3.1 mgg -x in P. montana). Nitrogen did not show any trend with tissue or species type. A linear model between mass remaining after 6 months and initial tissue chemistry could be developed only for calcium (r 2= 0.64).
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