Comparison of passive fog gages for determining fog duration and fog interception by a Puerto Rican elfin cloud forest

Holwerda, F.; Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Scatena, F.N. 2010. Comparison of passive fog gages for determining fog duration and fog interception by a Puerto Rican elfin cloud forest. Bruijnzeel, L.A.; Scatena, F.N.; Hamilton, L.S., eds. Tropical Montane Cloud Forests: Science for Conservation and Management. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press. p. 275-281.

Abstract: 
Rates and amounts of fog interception by vegetation depend on wind speed, fog liquid water 4 content (LWC) and duration, as well as surface area and geometry of the vegetation 5 (Schemenauer, 1986). Information on the timing and duration of fog can be obtained with 6 passive fog gages, provided these are protected from rainfall and equipped with a recording 7 device (Bruijnzeel et al., 2005). Fog LWC may also be evaluated from collections by passive 8 gages when information on their collection efficiency and prevailing wind speeds is available 9 (e.g. Schemenauer and Joe, 1989). A variety of passive gages is available, and there has been 10 some discussion as to what is the most suitable type of gage to characterize local fog 11 conditions (Juvik and Nullet, 1995a; Schemenauer and Cereceda, 1995; cf. Delay and 12 Giambelluca, in press; Frumau et al., this issue). For example, a cylindrical gage is considered 13 superior to a flat screen, because it has uniform exposure to all wind directions (Juvik and 14 Nullet, 1995a; cf. García Santos and Bruijnzeel, this issue; Giambelluca et al., this issue). On 15 the other hand, a flat screen generally has a much larger collection area than a cylindrical 16 gage, and may thus measure fog when LWC or wind speeds are low (Schemenauer and 17 Cereceda, 1995).