THE RAINFALL-TRIGGERED LANDSLIDE AND FLASH FLOOD DISASTER IN NORTHERN VENEZUELA, DECEMBER 1999

Larsen M.C., Wieczorek G.F., Eaton L.S., Torres-Sierra H. (2001) – The rainfall-triggered landslide and flash-flood disaster in northern Venezuela, December 1999. Proceedings of the Seventh Federal Interagency Sedimentation Conference, Reno, NV, IV, 9-16.

Abstract: 
A combination of climatologic, geologic, and demographic factors makes the Caribbean coast of Venezuela in the state of Vargas highly susceptible to episodic debris flows and flash floods. An extremely steep, tectonically active mountain front forms the boundary with a tropical sea. Easterly tradewinds can force moist air masses upslope and precipitate large rainfall volumes, creating conditions for high-magnitude debris flows and flash floods. The population of several hundred thousand people that reside at the base of the mountains is inevitably vulnerable to hydrologic disasters that seem to recur once or twice per century. The flash flood-debris flow process combination is highly destructive in populated areas. Without careful planning of human settlements, the impacts of these types of disasters are likely to increase in the future.