Events

Sep
27

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Vijay Balasubramanian Decoding Your Mental GPS: Transcendental Numbers in the BrainPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.

The brain uses specialized neurons known as place and grid cells to keep track of location. The discovery of the latter earned researchers a Nobel Prize, but the way the brain encodes and decodes this information is still a mystery. Now, a team of University of Pennsylvania researchers, led by Vijay Balasubramanian, has a theory for how grid cells work together to pinpoint an organism’s location on a mental map. He’ll explain how the brain’s many overlapping grids are connected by a special ratio, organizing them into something akin to the decimal system. 

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Sep
28

6:30 pm - 9:30 pm
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Public Classroom @ Penn Museum: Biomedicine and Race Penn Museum, Harrison Auditorium, 3260 South Street

Does racial background have an effect on the health of individuals or communities?

From molecules to pharmacogenetics, race has made its way into medical practice. Discussions surround how, or if, racial differences contribute to disease susceptibility within biomedical practice.

Speakers include:

Martha Farah, Ph.D.
Annenberg Professor of Natural Sciences and Director of the Center for Neuroscience & Society, University of Pennsylvania

John L. Jackson, Jr., Ph.D.
Richard Perry University Professor, Penn Integrates Knowledge (PIK) Professor, Dean of the School of Social Policy & Practice, University of Pennsylvania

Janet Monge, Ph.D.
Curator-in-Charge of the Physical Anthropology Section in the Penn Museum and Adjunct Professor in Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania

Jay Kaufman, Ph.D.
Faculty of Medicine, Department of Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McGill Centre on Population Dynamics, McGill University, Visiting Professor (2015), Penn Programs on Race, Science, and Society, University of Pennsylvania

Dorothy Roberts, Ph.D.
George A. Weiss University Professor of Law and Sociology, Raymond Pace and Sadie Tanner Mossell Alexander Professor of Civil Rights, Director, Program on Race, Science, and Society

Carolyn Rouse
Professor and Chair, Department of Anthropology , Princeton University

Moderator:

Taunya English 
Senior Health Writer, WHYY



Oct
5

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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Emilio Parrado New Realities of Latin American Migration to the United States: Implications for Policy DiscussionsKnowledge by the Slice Cohen Hall, Terrace Room, 249 South 36th Street

Migration is a significant life event with diverse implications for the migrants and their families, as well as for sending and receiving areas and countries. Parrado’s research focuses on migration and its interaction with other demographic and social processes. Currently he’s studying the intersection of gender, migration, and health risks among Mexican and Honduran migrants. Combining quantitative and qualitative methods, he draws upon diverse sources of data such as population, economic statistics, and surveys, as well as ethnographic and historical materials for contextualizing relationships and interpreting outcomes.

Penn Arts and Sciences' Knowledge by the Slice lunchtime series offers educational talks led by insightful faculty experts. Did we mention there's pizza? So sit back, relax—and have a slice on us.

If you can't make it to the lecture, you can watch Knowledge by the Slice live online! Visit www.sas.upenn.edu/slice/live to learn more, sign up for an email reminder, or view the lecture. You can also view past Knowledge by the Slice lectures at: www.sas.upenn.edu/slice



Oct
18

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Michael Leja A History of Print Advertising in the Presidential RacePenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.

Michael Leja, a professor of art history, studies the visual arts in various media from the 19th and 20th centuries, including painting, sculpture, film, photography, prints, and illustrations. His work focuses on understanding visual artifacts in relation to contemporary cultural, social, political, and intellectual developments and in a historical context. In this Café, Leja will explore what it was like when presidential candidates first began using print advertisements.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Oct
25

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Alain Plante The Carbon Beneath Our FeetPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.

There is more carbon in the earth’s soils than in the atmosphere and plants combined. There is also six times more carbon exchanged annually between soils and the atmosphere, primarily as carbon dioxide, compared to annual fossil fuel emissions. Yet, as Leonardo DaVinci said, “We know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot.” In this talk, Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Science Alain Plante will describe the role soils play in the global carbon cycle and in sustainable agriculture and land use.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Nov
1

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Daniel Hopkins Ethnicity, Race, and Voting Behaviors of AmericansPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.

In the final Penn Lightbulb Café before the 2016 presidential election, political scientist Daniel Hopkins will discuss what has driven the campaign, from how people decide on a candidate to who will likely turn out to vote. Generally, Hopkins studies questions related to racial politics, ethnicity, immigration, and urban politics and is writing a book about the nationalization of Americans’ voting behavior. He has a secondary appointment at Penn’s Annenberg School for Communication.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Dec
6

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Daniel Gillion Governing With WordsPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut St.

An associate professor of political science, Daniel Q. Gillion studies racial and ethnic politics, political behavior, public policy, and the American presidency. In his latest book Governing With Words: The Political Dialogue on Race, Public Policy and Inequality in America, he tackles the direct influence politicians’ race-conscious speeches have had on government productivity and changes in societal behavior. He also examines how a shift to “colorblind” policies has unexpectedly reduced discussions of racial inequality. But for politicians, he says, talking about race is not as harmful as once thought and can actually be beneficial.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe