Events

Oct
18

12:00 pm
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Reto Giere Effects of Climate Change in the Swiss AlpsKnowledge by the Slice Irvine Auditorium, Cafe 58, 3401 Spruce Street

Over the past 30 years, the temperature increase observed in Switzerland has been considerably higher than the warming in the northern hemisphere. In the Swiss Alps, one of the most dramatic effects of the increasing temperature is the fast retreat of nearly all glaciers. Less visible, but equally concerning, is the melting of permafrost at high elevations. Reto Gieré, Professor and Chair of Earth and Environmental Science, will introduce the audience to key examples of glacial retreat and permafrost melting, associated impacts on landscape and infrastructure, and strategies used to protect the local population from predicted catastrophic events. 

Penn Arts and Sciences' Knowledge by the Slice lunchtime series offers educational talks led by insightful faculty experts. Did we mention there's pizza? So sit back, relax—and have a slice on us.

Can’t make it to the lecture? Watch a live stream of Knowledge by the Slice on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS. For more information, go to www.sas.upenn.edu and click on the Knowledge by the Slice icon.

You can also view past Knowledge by the Slice lectures here: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/slice/



Oct
24

6:00 pm
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Camille Charles The Real Record on Racial AttitudesPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Issues of race and racial division have been prominent features of social organization and culture in the United States from as far back as the historical record goes. As a leading scholar in American race relations, Charles maps the major divisions of, and trends in, U.S. racial attitudes and documents both significant progressive changes as well as substantial enduring frictions and conflicts that continue to make race such a fraught terrain. She will tackle the conceptually broad and analytically powerful record, which is a strong caution against glib generalities that attempt to reduce an enormously multifaceted social phenomenon to simplistic catch phrases like "racist America," "the end of racism" or, more recently, "post-racial America."

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Oct
27

6:00 pm
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Jill Tarter Women in Physics: "A Cosmic Perspective: Searching for Aliens, Finding Ourselves" Penn Museum, Harrison Auditorium, 3260 South Street

Are we alone? Humans have been asking this question throughout history. We want to know where we came from, how we fit into the cosmos, and where we are going. We want to know whether there is life beyond the Earth and whether any of it is intelligent.

Since the middle of the 20th century we have had tools that permit us to embark on a scientific exploration to try to answer this old question.  We no longer have to ask the priests and philosophers what we should believe about extraterrestrial life; we can explore and discover what’s actually out there. Our tools are getting ever better.  We have discovered extremophiles in the most unexpected places on this planet and we have discovered that there really are far more planets than stars out there.  We haven’t yet found life beyond Earth, but there is a vast amount of potentially-habitable real estate to explore. The 21st century will be the century in which we will find some answers, this will be your century.

As we look up and look out, we are forced to see ourselves from a cosmic perspective; a perspective that shows us as all the same, all Earthlings. This perspective is fundamental to finding a way to sustain life on Earth for the long future.

Dr. Jill Tarter has served as the Project Scientist for NASA’s SETI program, the High Resolution Microwave Survey, and has conducted numerous observational programs at radio observatories worldwide. Among her numerous honors, she has received the Lifetime Achievement Award from Women in Aerospace, two Public Service Medals from NASA, Chabot Observatory’s Person of the Year award (1997), Women of Achievement Award in the Science and Technology category by the Women’s Fund and the San Jose Mercury News (1998), and the Tesla Award of Technology at the Telluride Tech Festival (2001). She was elected an AAAS Fellow in 2002 and a California Academy of Sciences Fellow in 2003. Among the public, she is perhaps best known for having inspired the character played by Jodie Foster in the movie Contact. The timing of the lecture is fortuitous, as October 2017 marks the 20th anniversary of the release of Contact.

Co-hosted by the Department of Physics & Astronomy, this event is made possible by a grant from the Fund to Encourage Women (FEW) of the Trustees’ Council to Encourage Women.



Oct
31

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Naomi Waltham-Smith Listening Under Global TrumpismPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

The crisis of political legitimacy and the collapse of the center left that have fueled the rise of the far right are often described as a failure to listen. Within this context, Dr. Waltham-Smith will examine how neoliberalism has transformed the way we hear, leading to a crisis of listening, and how studying the soundscapes of protest can provide new insights about a phenomenon that might be called global Trumpism. Dr. Waltham-Smith will share field recordings she made at marches, demonstrations, and occupations in the U.S., the U.K., and France in response to the Brexit referendum, the election of Trump, and the French presidential-election campaign.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.



Nov
4

10:45 am - 12:00 pm
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60-Second Lectures - Alumni Edition!60-Second Lecture Fisher-Bennett Hall, Rose Recital Hall, 3340 Walnut Street

Alumni take over for a special Homecoming edition of Penn Arts and Sciences' 60-Second Lecture Series!

In just one minute each, College alumni will cover how their liberal arts degrees have influenced their careers, the value of the Penn network, or what advice they would give their younger selves.

Join us for the distillation of Penn's impact and influence.  



Nov
4

10:45 am - 12:00 pm
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60-Second Lectures - Alumni Edition!60-Second Lecture Fisher-Bennett Hall, Rose Recital Hall, 3340 Walnut Street

Alumni take over for a special Homecoming edition of Penn Arts and Sciences’ 60-Second Lecture Series!

In just one minute each, College alumni will cover how their liberal arts degree has influenced their careers, the value of the Penn network, or what advice they would give their younger selves.

Join us for this distillation of Penn’s impact and influence.



Nov
14

6:00 pm
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Fatemeh Shams Where Is "Home"? Displacement and Exile in Persian Literary TraditionPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Although terms such as "displacement" and "exile" have been more recurrent in the wake of the ongoing refugee crisis across the world, the constant search of "home" has been always present in various literary traditions, including Persian literature. In this talk, Shams will explore various meanings and representations of "home" throughout the classical and modern literary traditions in an attempt to understand the notion of "exile" and "displacement" as a mental and physical mode of existence.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Nov
15

12:00 pm
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Charles Bernstein Chris Mustazza Radio Free Poetry:PennSound@14Knowledge by the Slice Irvine Auditorium, Cafe 58, 3401 Spruce Street

This talk will explore the history of the PennSound archive, the world’s largest online archive of recordings of poets reading their own work. With recordings reaching back to Apollinaire’s 1913 performance at the Sorbonne through recently recorded audio of contemporary poets, PennSound is dedicated to being free and open to all. In addition to a look at the archive itself, including historical recordings of poets like Robert Frost and Gertrude Stein, we will detail ways in which PennSound is being used for cutting-edge digital research into the performed poem.

Penn Arts and Sciences' Knowledge by the Slice lunchtime series offers educational talks led by insightful faculty experts. Did we mention there's pizza? So sit back, relax—and have a slice on us.

Can’t make it to the lecture? Watch a live stream of Knowledge by the Slice on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS. For more information, go to www.sas.upenn.edu and click on the Knowledge by the Slice icon.

You can also view past Knowledge by the Slice lectures here: http://www.sas.upenn.edu/slice/



Dec
5

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Masao Sako Unseen Objects in Our Solar SystemPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Masao Sako will discuss his research on searching for new objects in the solar system. He will describe efforts to discover objects beyond the orbit of Neptune, some of which contain valuable information about the complicated dynamical history of the system. Dr. Sako will also discuss why astronomers think that there is a massive previously-unseen planet out there, called Planet Nine, and how it might be found.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



May
4

9:00 am - 5:00 pm
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DCC Annual Conference: States of Religious FreedomCivil Discourse at Penn Arts and Sciences

What is religious freedom? Can it truly be universal? What are the rights of religious minorities when set against a nation's popular majority? And when religious liberties seemingly conflict with gender and sexuality rights, which should prevail if the conflict cannot be resolved?  

In its 2018 Annual Conference, The Andrea Mitchell Center for the Study of Democracy will address these challenging questions and disucss how the U.S. accomodates, or hinders, religious expression, culture, and the practice of religious freedom.

This year's panelists will include: Lori G. Beaman (University of Ottawa), W. Cole Durham (Brigham Young University), R. Marie Griffith (Washington University in St. Louis), Nadia Marzouki (Harvard Kennedy School), Daniel Philpott (University of Notre Dame), and Winifred Sullivan (Indiana University at Bloomington).

Co-sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Department of Religious Studies.

For additional information, please visit www.sas.upenn.edu/dcc