Events

Feb
21

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Lauren Sallan The Rise of Tiny FishPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

The 64,000 living species of vertebrates dominate ecosystems on land (as tetrapods, including humans) and in the sea (as ray-fin fishes and sharks.) The rise of vertebrates in the Paleozoic (542-250 million years ago) is usually cast as a gradual march towards bigger and better things. Paleontologist Lauren Sallan will describe how new, 'big data' approaches to the early fossil record have shown that modern vertebrate biodiversity is the unlikely, but predictable, result of global change, environmental challenges, ecological interactions, and even mass extinction.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe 

 



Feb
22

12:00 pm - 1:00 pm
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Peter Decherney Karen Redrobe Meta Mazaj Kathy DeMarco Van Cleve OSCARS 2017: The Glitter and PoliticsKnowledge by the Slice Irvine Auditorium, Amado Recital Hall, 3401 Spruce Street

Members of the Cinema and Media Studies faculty will discuss the movies, directors, and stars nominated for Oscars in 2017. What does this year’s slate of movies tell us? Who will win and why? Has Hollywood begun to address the criticisms of its lack of diversity that surrounded last year’s ceremony? Did the musical genre and Mel Gibson make permanent comebacks in 2016? 

Penn Arts and Sciences' long-running Knowledge by the Slice series offers educational talks led by insightful faculty experts. Did we mention there's pizza? So come for the discussion and have a slice on us. 

Can't make it to the lecture? Watch a live stream of Knowledge by the Slice on Facebook and Twitter.

You can also view past Knowledge by the Slice lectures here.

 



Feb
23

4:30 pm
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Reza Aslan Fear Inc.: Confronting Islamophobia in AmericaLevin Family Dean's Forum Penn Museum, Harrison Auditorium, 3260 South Street

Featuring internationally renowned writer, commentator, professor, producer, and scholar of religions Reza Aslan.

Reza Aslan

In a world where Muslim people are so often painted with one sweeping prejudicial brush, Reza Aslan’s principled and logical defense is a direly needed corrective. Rich in historical and factual detail, his talk is a wake-up call for North Americans to confront and abolish hatred and discrimination against Muslim people—otherwise known as Islamophobia. As the American Muslim population is predicted to more than double over the next two decades (from 2.6 million in 2010 to 6.2 million in 2030), eradicating Islamophobia for good should be first and foremost in the minds of everyone who dreams of a more peaceful, equitable world.

Aslan is the author of the New York Times bestseller Zealot: The Life and Times of Jesus of Nazareth and of No god but God: The Origins, Evolution, and Future of Islam, which was named by Blackwell Publishers as one of the 100 most important books of the last decade. He will be the host of Believer, CNN’s forthcoming show on world religions. A member of many prominent foreign relations and policy councils, Aslan has degrees in religion from Santa Clara University, Harvard, and the University of California at Santa Barbara, as well as a Master of Fine Arts from the University of Iowa. This year, he has been named the recipient of the James Joyce Award and an Honorary Fellowship of the Literary and Historical Society, Europe’s largest university society.

The Levin Family Dean’s Forum is a celebration of the arts and sciences. Initiated in 1984, the Forum presents leading intellectual figures who exemplify the richness of the liberal arts. It also recognizes outstanding undergraduate and graduate students for their academic achievement and intellectual promise. The Levin Family Dean’s Forum is made possible by a generous gift from Stephen A. Levin, C’67, in honor of his sons Eric T. Levin, C’92, and Andrew Levin, C'14.

Free and open to the public. Doors open at 4:00 p.m.



Mar
7

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Brendan O’Leary What Are the Implications of UKEXIT for Northern Ireland and Ireland? Can the Good Friday Agreement Survive?Penn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Brendan O’Leary, a U.S. and Irish citizen, will discuss what the so-called BREXIT might mean for both parts of Ireland, including the likely outcomes, good and not-so-good.  A specialist in power sharing and constitutional reconstruction, O’Leary has worked with the European Union, the United Nations, and the Kurds of Iraq. He was also influential in the making of the Good Friday Agreement of 1998, which offered a peaceful resolution to nearly 30 years of conflict between Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Mar
17

12:00 pm - 6:30 pm
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Grad Ben Talks International House Philadelphia, South America Room, 3701 Chestnut Street

 


A day of TED Talk-style presentations by Penn Arts and Sciences graduate students representing the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, and professional master’s programs. Each student will present a 10-minute talk to an audience of undergraduates, faculty, staff, and fellow graduate students. Judges will select winners in each of the four categories, and each winner will receive a $500 cash prize. All will be invited to a closing reception where winners will be announced.

Presentations: Noon–5 p.m.
Reception: 5–6:30 p.m.

Free and open to the public.

This competition is open to students enrolled in any of Penn Arts and Sciences’ graduate groups or professional master’s programs. 
Enter now! Deadline February 17.




Mar
21

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Richard Berk Big Data and Algorithms: Can They Be Fair and Accurate at the Same Time?Penn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Working with Penn colleagues in statistics and computer science, Richard Berk develops and deploys algorithms that assist in criminal-justice decision making. His computer software is used to help inform whether a prison inmate is released on parole and the kind of supervision provided to individuals on probation. He is currently working on projects regarding release decisions at arraignment and police handling of incidents of intimate-partner violence. In each application, the goal is to improve current practice. Nevertheless, these tools can be controversial because of errors and potential unfairness for the people affected. Are there tradeoffs between accurate forecasts of criminal behavior and fairness, and what about the consequences for potential crime victims?

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Mar
30

4:30 pm - 6:00 pm
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David Yokum Tales of Psychological Science from City Hall to Oval OfficeGoldstone Forum Claudia Cohen Hall, Terrace Room, 249 Soth 36th Street

Apr
4

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Nancy Steinhardt How Chinese Architecture Became Modern, 1927-1977Penn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

From 1927, when the first group of Chinese architects trained abroad returned home, to 1977, the year Mao Zedong died, Chinese architecture transformed from buildings like the Forbidden City to a modern building system inspired by Western architecture. France, the United States, the Soviet Union, Taiwan, and Japan are all part of this story that takes place during the war-torn 1930s and 1940s, through the Soviet advisors of the 1950s and the Cultural Revolution of 1966-1976. Sun Yat-sen and Mao were central to China’s drive toward modernism in this tumultuous half-century.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe