Events

Sep
12

6:00 pm
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Dustin Brisson Re-Invasion of Lyme Disease in the Northeastern United StatesPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Lyme disease appears to have re-emerged in the late 1900s after hundreds of years of near-complete absence. In this talk, Dustin Brisson will share his research exploring how and why Lyme disease has recently and rapidly returned to be the most prevalent vector-borne disease in North America.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Sep
12

6:00 pm
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Penn Science and Lightbulb Cafe Lecture Series - Fall 2017 World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Enjoy an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation with expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania! Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences, in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Science and Lightbulb Café events allow faculty specializing in science, social sciences, arts and humanities to present and discuss their research with audience members.

Held on Tuesday evenings at World Cafe Live, from September 12 - December 5, 2017, Science and Lightbulb Cafe lectures are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged.  Each talk begins at 6 p.m. and is followed by a Q&A session.

For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Here is a listing of upcoming Science and Lightbulb Cafes for Fall 2017:

Re-invasion of Lyme Disease in the Northeastern United States
Tuesday, September 12 – PENN SCIENCE CAFÉ

Lyme disease appears to have re-emerged in the late 1900s after hundreds of years of near complete absence. In this talk, Dustin Brisson, associate professor in the Biology Department will share his research exploring how and why Lyme disease has recently and rapidly returned to be the most prevalent vector-borne disease in North America.


Dismantling the Carceral State: Law, Order and Criminal Justice Reform in the Age of Trump
Tuesday, Sepember 26 – PENN LIGHTBULB CAFÉ

Marie Gottschalk, professor of political science, studies the origins and politics of mass incarceration, focusing on the idea of a "carceral state" with millions of people who are in prison, on probation or on parole.  Dr. Gottschalk specializes in American politics, criminal justice, health policy, race, the development of the welfare state and business-labor relations. She was one of the 30 academics, historians, activists and politicians included in Ana DuVernay’s “13th,” a Netflix documentary about mass incarceration that refers to the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery but left an exploitable loophole: "except as punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted."


Poverty in the American South
Tuesday, October 10 – PENN SCIENCE CAFÉ

Although poverty and uneven development exists throughout the United States, the South has had a disproportionate share of the nation’s socioeconomic problems. For decades, poverty has been the highest and most persistent in that region, and the Great Recession has only worsened the problem.  In this talk, ,assistant professor of sociology, Dr. Regina Baker, will address the reasons for this regional disparity and why, as a nation, Americans should care. Drawing on her research on the South, Dr. Baker will discuss the role of demographic, economic, political and racial factors in understanding poverty in the context of place. She will also touch on the uncertainty of future safety nets for America’s most vulnerable populations in the current political climate.


The Real Record on Racial Attitudes
Tuesday, October 24 – PENN LIGHTBULB CAFÉ

Issues of race and racial division have been prominent features of  social organization and culture in the United States from as far back as the historical record goes. As a leading scholar in American race relations, Walter H. and Leonore C. Annenberg Professor in the Social Sciences, Dr. Camille Charles, maps the major divisions of, and trends in, U.S. racial attitudes, and documents both significant progressive changes as well as substantial enduring frictions and conflicts that continue to make race such a fraught terrain. She will tackle the conceptually broad and analytically powerful record which is a strong caution against glib generalities that attempt to reduce an enormously multifaceted social phenomenon to simplistic catch phrases like "racist America," "the end of racism" or, more recently, "post-racial America."


Listening Under Global Trumpism
Tuesday, October 31 – PENN LIGHTBULB CAFÉ

The crisis of political legitimacy and the collapse of the center left that have fueled the rise of the far right is often described as a failure to listen. Within this context, assistant professor of music, Dr. Naomi Waltham-Smith, will examine how neoliberalism has transformed the way we hear, leading to a crisis of listening, and how studying the soundscapes of protest can provide new insights about a phenomenon that might be called global Trumpism. Dr. Waltham-Smith will share field recordings she made at marches, demonstrations and occupations in the U.S., the U.K. and France in response to the Brexit referendum, the election of Trump and the French presidential-election campaign.


Where Is ‘Home’? Displacement and Exile in Persian Literary Tradition
Tuesday, November 14 – PENN LIGHTBULB CAFÉ

Although terms such as "displacement" and "exile" have been more recurrent in the wake of the ongoing refugee crisis across the world, the constant search of "home" has been always present in various literary traditions including Persian literature. In this talk, Dr. Fatemeh Shams, Persian poet and professor in Near Eastern languages and civilizations, will explore various meanings and representations of "home" throughout the classical and modern literary traditions in an attempt to understand the notion of “exile” and “displacement” as a mental and physical mode of existence. 


Unseen Objects in Our Solar System
Tuesday, December 5 – PENN SCIENCE CAFÉ

Masao Sako, associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, will discuss his research on searching for new objects in the solar system. He will describe efforts to discover objects beyond the orbit of Neptune, some of which contain valuable information about the complicated dynamical history of the system. Dr. Sako will also discuss why astronomers think that there is a massive previously-unseen planet out there, called Planet Nine, and how it might be found.


Sep
13

12:00 pm
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Charles Loeffler When Does A Child Become an Adult?60-Second Lecture Benjamin Franklin Statue, In front of College Hall

Got a minute?

Every spring and fall, Penn Arts and Sciences' faculty squeeze a wealth of knowledge and discovery into just one minute. Topics range from human history, to fractions, to fly-fishing.

Lectures are held at 12 p.m. on their scheduled dates, in front of the Benjamin Franklin statue on the College Green.

In the case of inclement weather, lectures will be held at the Bistro inside of Houston Hall.

Upcoming Lectures:

September 20
Campbell Grey, Associate Professor of Classical Studies
Why Do We Walk Where We Walk? A Meditation on Movement, Meaning, and Agency

September 27
Meredith Tamminga, Assistant Professor of Linguistics
Changing Sounds and Changing Signs in Philadelphia Dialects

Can't make it to the lecture? Watch a livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS. 



Sep
20

12:00 pm
share
Campbell Grey Why Do We Walk Where We Walk? A Meditation on Movement, Meaning, and Agency60-Second Lecture Benjamin Franklin Statue, in front of College Hall

Got a minute?

Every spring and fall, Penn Arts and Sciences' faculty squeeze a wealth of knowledge and discovery into just one minute. Topics range from human history, to fractions, to fly-fishing.

Lectures are held at 12 p.m. on their scheduled dates, in front of the Benjamin Franklin statue on the College Green.  

In the case of inclement weather, lectures will be held at the Bistro inside of Houston Hall.

Upcoming Lectures:

September 27
Meredith Tamminga, Assistant Professor of Linguistics
Changing Sounds and Changing Signs in Philadelphia Dialects

Can't make it to the lecture? Watch a livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS. 



Sep
26

6:00 pm
share
Marie Gottschalk Dismantling the Carceral State: Law, Order, and Criminal Justice Reform in the Age of TrumpPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Marie Gottschalk studies the origins and politics of mass incarceration, focusing on the idea of a “carceral state” with millions of people who are in prison, on probation, or on parole.

Gottschalk specializes in American politics, criminal justice, health policy, race, the development of the welfare state, and business-labor relations. She was one of the 30 academics, historians, activists, and politicians included in Ana DuVernay’s 13th, a Netflix documentary about mass incarceration that refers to the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery but left an exploitable loophole: “except as punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted.”

She’s the author of Caught: The Prison State and the Lockdown of American Politics and The Prison and the Gallows: The Politics of Mass Incarceration in America, which won the 2007 Ellis W. Hawley Prize from the Organization of American Historians.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Sep
27

12:00 pm
share
Meredith Tamminga Changing Sounds and Changing Signs in Philadelphia Dialects60-Second Lecture Benjamin Franklin Statue, in front of College Hall

Got a minute?

Every spring and fall, Penn Arts and Sciences' faculty squeeze a wealth of knowledge and discovery into just one minute. Topics range from human history, to fractions, to fly-fishing.

Lectures are held at 12 p.m. on their scheduled dates, in front of the Benjamin Franklin statue on the College Green.

In the case of inclement weather, lectures will be held at the Bistro inside of Houston Hall.

Can't make it to the lecture? Watch a livestream on Facebook or Twitter @PennSAS.

Watch past lectures online at www.sas.upenn.edu/60second.



Sep
28

6:00 pm
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Religious Freedom in Trouble? An Interfaith Discussion National Constitution Center, 525 Arch Street

During its 2017-18 theme year on “STATES OF RELIGIOUS FREEDOM,” the Penn Program on Democracy, Citizenship and Constitutionalism will study the U.S. experience within a comparative international context exploring how states, as political entities, accommodate or hinder religious expression and culture, as well as how social conditions affect and influence the practice of religious freedom.

Join Kristina Arriga, Dan Barker, Khalid Latif, and David Saperstein on Tuesday, September 28, for DCC's opening event, "Religious Freedom in Trouble? An Interfaith Discussion."

KRISTINA ARRIAGA has worked on the defense of religious freedom domestically and internationally for over 20 years as Advisor to the United States delegation to the United Nations Human Rights Commission, an appointee to the Civil Rights Commission, and as the Executive Director of Becket Law. She currently serves as the Vice Chair of the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom (USCIRF). Arriaga is a sought-after speaker and lecturer on religious freedom, has spoken at numerous academic conferences, and has appeared on TV and radio programs including MSNBC, C-Span, FOX, CNN Español, and National Public Radio. Arriaga is the recipient of the 2017 Newseum’s Free Speech award.

DAN BARKER is co-president of the Freedom From Religion Foundation. He was elected co-president of the Foundation with Annie Laurie Gaylor in 2004, with whom he is co-host of Freethought Radio, a national weekly talk show. He is a contributing editor of Freethought Today and is involved with the Foundation’s state/church lawsuits. He regularly travels the country and the world giving lectures, performing concerts, and participating in debates with theists, many at college and university campuses. A former minister and evangelist, his books include Just Pretend: A Freethought Book for Children and Losing Faith in Faith: From Preacher To Atheist. Recent books include Life Driven Purpose: How an Atheist Finds Meaning (2015), GOD: The Most Unpleasant Character in All Fiction (2016), and the forthcoming Make Up Your Mind: Do We Really Have Free Will? (2018).

KHALID LATIF is Executive Director and Chaplain (Imam) for the Islamic Center at New York University (NYU). In 2005, Imam Latif was appointed the first Muslim chaplain at NYU. At NYU, Khalid initiated his vision for a pluralistic American Muslim community, rooted on campus and reaching out to the city. In 2006, Imam Latif was appointed the first Muslim chaplain at Princeton University.  In 2007, his position was fully institutionalized at New York University, and so he committed himself to building Muslim community life there. Today's Islamic Center is a leader among American Muslim organizations, uniquely shaped to contribute to the future of Muslim practice in the West.

DAVID SAPERSTEIN
was the U.S. Ambassador-at-Large for International Religious Freedom for the Obama Administration from 2014-2017. Selected by Newsweek magazine in 2009 as the most influential rabbi in the country and described in a Washington Post profile as the "quintessential religious lobbyist on Capitol Hill," Rabbi Saperstein represented the Reform Jewish Movement to Congress and the Administration as the Director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism (RAC) for forty years. Also an attorney, Rabbi Saperstein teaches seminars in First Amendment Church-State Law and in Jewish Law at Georgetown University Law School.

This event is co-sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Department of Religious Studies.

For additional information about this event and future Penn DCC events, please visit www.sas.upenn.edu/dcc.  



Oct
10

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
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Regina Baker Poverty in the American SouthPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

Although poverty and uneven development exists throughout the United States, the South has had a disproportionate share of the nation’s socioeconomic problems. For decades, poverty has been the highest and most persistent in that region, and the Great Recession has only worsened the problem.

In this talk, Dr. Baker will address the reasons for this regional disparity and why, as a nation, Americans should care.Drawing on her research on the South, Dr. Baker will discuss the role of demographic, economic, political and racial factors in understanding poverty in the context of place. She will also touch on the uncertainty of future safety nets for America’s most vulnerable populations in the current political climate.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Oct
24

6:00 pm
share
Camille Charles The Real Record on Racial AttitudesPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Issues of race and racial division have been prominent features of social organization and culture in the United States from as far back as the historical record goes. As a leading scholar in American race relations, Charles maps the major divisions of, and trends in, U.S. racial attitudes and documents both significant progressive changes as well as substantial enduring frictions and conflicts that continue to make race such a fraught terrain. She will tackle the conceptually broad and analytically powerful record, which is a strong caution against glib generalities that attempt to reduce an enormously multifaceted social phenomenon to simplistic catch phrases like "racist America," "the end of racism" or, more recently, "post-racial America."

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Oct
31

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
share
Naomi Waltham-Smith Listening Under Global TrumpismPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live, 3025 Walnut Street

The crisis of political legitimacy and the collapse of the center left that have fueled the rise of the far right is often described as a failure to listen. Within this context, Dr. Waltham-Smith will examine how neoliberalism has transformed the way we hear, leading to a crisis of listening, and how studying the soundscapes of protest can provide new insights about a phenomenon that might be called global Trumpism. Dr. Waltham-Smith will share field recordings she made at marches, demonstrations and occupations in the U.S., the U.K. and France in response to the Brexit referendum, the election of Trump and the French presidential-election campaign.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.



Nov
4

10:45 am - 12:00 pm
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60-Second Lectures - Alumni Edition!60-Second Lecture Fisher-Bennett Hall, Rose Recital Hall, 3340 Walnut Street

Alumni take over for a special Homecoming edition of Penn Arts and Sciences' 60-Second Lecture Series!

In just one minute each, College alumni will cover how their liberal arts degree has influenced thier careers, the value of the Penn network, or what advice they would give their younger selves.

Join us for the distillation of Penn's impact and influence.  



Nov
14

6:00 pm
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Fatemeh Shams Where Is "Home"? Displacement and Exile in Persian Literary TraditionPenn Lightbulb Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Although terms such as "displacement" and "exile" have been more recurrent in the wake of the ongoing refugee crisis across the world, the constant search of "home" has been always present in various literary traditions, including Persian literature. In this talk, Shams will explore various meanings and representations of "home" throughout the classical and modern literary traditions in an attempt to understand the notion of "exile" and "displacement" as a mental and physical mode of existence.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research in the arts, humanities, and social sciences at the Penn Lightbulb Cafe. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Cafe events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



Dec
5

6:00 pm - 7:00 pm
share
Masao Sako Unseen Objects in Our Solar SystemPenn Science Cafe World Cafe Live Upstairs, 3025 Walnut Street

Masao Sako will discuss his research on searching for new objects in the solar system. He will describe efforts to discover objects beyond the orbit of Neptune, some of which contain valuable information about the complicated dynamical history of the system. Dr. Sako will also discuss why astronomers think that there is a massive previously-unseen planet out there, called Planet Nine, and how it might be found.

Expert faculty from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on their research at the Penn Science Café. It's an evening of engaging, stimulating conversation, with a Q&A session following each talk.

Presented by Penn Arts and Sciences in partnership with the Office of University Communications, Penn Café events are free and open to the public, but RSVPs are encouraged. For more information or directions, contact Gina Bryan at 215-898-8721 or email at bryangm@upenn.edu.

Menu items are available for purchase. Happy Hour pricing from 4–6 p.m.

https://news.upenn.edu/sciencecafe



May
4

9:00 am - 5:00 pm
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DCC Annual Conference: States of Religious FreedomCivil Discourse at Penn Arts and Sciences

What is religious freedom? Can it truly be universal? What are the rights of religious minorities when set against a nation's popular majority? And when religious liberties seemingly conflict with gender and sexuality rights, which should prevail if the conflict cannot be resolved?  

In its 2018 Annual Conference, Penn DCC will address these challenging questions and disucss how the U.S. accomodates, or hinders, religious expression, culture, and the practice of religious freedom.

This year's panelists will include: Lori G. Beaman (University of Ottawa), W. Cole Durham (Brigham Young University), R. Marie Griffith (Washington University in St. Louis), Nadia Marzouki (Harvard Kennedy School), Daniel Philpott (University of Notre Dame), and Winifred Sullivan (Indiana University at Bloomington).

Co-sponsored by the University of Pennsylvania Department of Religious Studies.

For additional information, please visit www.sas.upenn.edu/dcc